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I have a project in Unreal Engine 4 and it's size is 4.5Gb. I want to commit it to the github. Is it any folders, which I can add to the GitIgnore?

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You should ignore any binary files (such as the game's .exe file). Here's a more complete list directly from Unreal Engine themselves:

Here is a typical folder structure for a code-based project. The files and folders in bold should be included, the rest can (and should) be safely ignored:

• Binaries*

Build - any custom build scripts or other build related dependencies you may have

Config - the default configuration files for your packaged project

Content - *maps, content files and assets***

• DerivedDataCache - temporary data files generated when you run the game

• Intermediate - temporary files generated when you compile your code

• Saved - local log & configuration files, screenshots, auto-saves etc. that are generated each time you run the game or Editor

Source - the source code of your project

• If your project uses third-party libraries, i.e. when integrating some software components or hardware devices, you may have DLLs, LIBs or other files in your Binaries directory that must be included if your project depends on them. However, do not include the DLLs and debug files (.pdb) that are generated for the project itself, i.e. MyProject.dll and MyProject.pdb.

  • In my project there are generated .dll and .pdb files everytime i create or change a class. Are those files supposed to be commited as well? Those pdb files are ~25 mb and if they are created with each change of code this is going to get big very fast.. :( – Acimaz May 10 '18 at 15:04
  • @Acimaz DLLs are just like normal executables except that they cannot be run directly. I haven't heard of PDB files before but it looks like they are generated from the debugger. General rule of thumb is that you don't want to commit any binary files (like EXEs and DLLs) since Git is intended for text files only. The only exception to this (as I had mentioned in my answer), is DLLs or other binaries from 3rd parties, since they won't change whenever you rebuild. TL;DR the answer to your question is no. – Jason Aug 25 '18 at 15:06

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