3

I have a data access layer that utilises Dapper but can't help feeling that it could be far more elegant. The DAL is just passing in parameters and mapping the model as per the named responses of the model so that part is straight forward at least, but I hate code that looks duplicated.

Here is an example

 public IEnumerable<Product> ProductSearch(int? userId, DateTime?      modifiedAfter, DateTime? modifiedBefore, Guid? productId)
    {
        IList<Product> products;

        using (var connection = _connection.OpenConnection())
        {
            const string sproc = "dbo.stp_Product_Search";

            products = connection.Query<JobProduct>(sproc, new
            {
                User_ID = userId,
                Modified_After = modifiedAfter,
                Modified_Before = modifiedBefore,
                Product_ID = productId
            }, commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure)
            .ToList();
        }
        return products;
    }

I have lots of code that is like this but with different parameters and entities used. Has anyone got any good examples?

  • Did you try EF? I see you use Dapper, but did you choose it while knowing about EF? – Alex Zhukovskiy Jul 6 '15 at 13:23
  • 1
    There is one Dapper extension project available in git (github.com/tmsmith/Dapper-Extensions) , this is very useful if you are using dapper. Look at it if it works for you otherwise also you can write a generic C# class for this. – Prashant Jul 6 '15 at 13:24
  • How are you able to assign a List<JobProduct> to an IList<Product>? – juharr Jul 6 '15 at 13:37
  • juharr thats just a typo from me sorry, its all Product – Anthony Joanes Jul 6 '15 at 13:51
  • 2
    I didn't want to use EF as I think it would be a nightmare to map to the underlying database that has been in existence for a while. – Anthony Joanes Jul 6 '15 at 13:52
6

Thanks to the suggestions. This is what I've used in the end and means I don't have to write using statements opening connections each time making my classes less lines of code:

public class Repository<T> where T : class
{
    protected readonly IComplianceConnection Connection;

    public Repository(IComplianceConnection connection)
    {
        Connection = connection;
    }

    public IEnumerable<T> Get(string query, object arguments)
    {
        IList<T> entities;

        using (var connection = Connection.OpenConnection())
        {
            entities = connection.Query<T>(query, arguments, commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure).ToList();
        }

        return entities;
    }

    public T GetSingleOrDefault(string query, object arguments)
    {
        T entity;

        using (var connection = Connection.OpenConnection())
        {
            entity =
                connection.Query<T>(query, arguments, commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure).SingleOrDefault();
        }

        return entity;
    }

    public void Update(string query, object arguments)
    {
        using (var connection = Connection.OpenConnection())
        {
            connection.Execute(query, arguments, commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure);
        }
    }

    public int ExecuteScalar(string query, object arguments)
    {
        var id = 0;
        using (var connection = Connection.OpenConnection())
        {
            id = connection.ExecuteScalar<int>(query, arguments, commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure);
        }
        return id;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Hi Anthony - I like your approach here and looking at doing something similar myself. Would you be able to expand you answer to show how you are using the Base repository class and then how you are calling those from Service Tier? – Ctrl_Alt_Defeat Mar 14 '17 at 13:56
  • @AnthonyJoanes do you have any further references you can share that helped you move to this Repository pattern ? – whytheq Mar 12 '19 at 11:46
1

I have been using Dapper on a project of mine recently and I have grown to like the fact its very bare bones. This is at least some of the reason its so fast.

But I do also understand what you are saying with regard to the repetition, If you are calling dbo.stp_Product_Search from many locations in your code you don't want to have to map the parameters and write out the entire query block each time.

You could look at wrapping Dapper inside a repository, but I dont like that approach, to me it feels like its a step back from the bare bones that I've grown to love about dapper.

I would consider a manager class.

public class ProductManager : IProductManager {
    //Constructor code here
    public IEnumerable<Product> ProductSearch(int? userId, DateTime? modifiedAfter, DateTime? modifiedBefore, Guid? productId)
    {
        using (var connection = _connection.OpenConnection())
        {
            const string sproc = "dbo.stp_Product_Search";

            return connection.Query<Product>(sproc, new
            {
                User_ID = userId,
                Modified_After = modifiedAfter,
                Modified_Before = modifiedBefore,
                Product_ID = productId
            }, commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure);
        }
    }
}

Make use of the above class to call product specific reusable bits of code.

| improve this answer | |
  • David I was thinking more of the many using statements that open connections, pass in parameters and get an object or list of objects back,. That pattern is repeated for all entities. I think I could probably create a generic class and make this a bit nicer though – Anthony Joanes Jul 6 '15 at 13:53
  • Ahh OK - Sorry miss understood what you were saying. Yes you could do something with generics. – David McLean Jul 6 '15 at 13:57
  • Something like this I guess: public class Repository<T> { protected readonly IConnection _connection; public Repository(IConnection connection) { _connection = connection; } public IEnumerable<T> Search(string query, object arguments) { IList<T> entities; using (var connection = _connection.OpenConnection()) { entities = connection.Query<T>(query, arguments, commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure).ToList(); } return entities; } } – Anthony Joanes Jul 6 '15 at 14:22
  • I prefer a mix solution of you both, the manager provides a clean meaning of what will be returned / executed on. – hazjack Jul 6 '15 at 16:01

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