11

Why does the following recursive code cause a stack overflow if the array list is too large? How can I fix this and still retain the recursive pattern?

var list = readHugeList();

var nextListItem = function() {
    var item = list.pop();

    if (item) {
        // process the list item...
        nextListItem();
    }
};
27
  • 8
    JavaScript has a very limited call stack size. I believe this should change when implementations are updated for ES6 since proper tail calls is part of the spec IIRC. To fix it, you'll need to do it in asynchronous batches, but this will make your code require a callback.
    – user1106925
    Jul 6, 2015 at 15:42
  • 1
    @squint Also, the maximum call stack on some browsers is a little over 1400. That is the case of Opera 12.17 and bellow. A solution would be to use a setTimeout of 1 milisecond. Jul 6, 2015 at 15:49
  • 1
    You can find some browsers stack sizes here : stackoverflow.com/questions/7826992/…
    – merours
    Jul 6, 2015 at 16:10
  • 1
    @IsmaelMiguel I need recursive solution and as you mentioned earlier use of the setTimeout works so I accepted the answer. Jul 6, 2015 at 16:40
  • 1
    Okey. Please consider this time. I'll keep in mind those things. I'm new to stackoverflow so I'm learning its processes Jul 6, 2015 at 16:44

3 Answers 3

5

This will sound weird, but use a setTimeout.

Like this:

//fill it with 50000 elements
var list = Array(50001).join('1.1').split('.');

var nextListItem = function() {
    var item = list.pop();

    if (item) { //should be list.length

        // recursion here!
        setTimeout( nextListItem, 0 );

    }
};
nextListItem();

The recursion now is endless!

Notice that some browsers don't like that 0 there.
As a side-effect, your code won't block the browser.

9
  • All browsers will fail on 0 or any falsey value. Since you're mutating the list, your base case should be to check list.length. Also, it'll be far more efficient to do a solution in batches instead of a new setTimeout for every item. It's never actually a 0 timer, so this could take quite a while. There are other complications too, depending on what he's actually doing.
    – user1106925
    Jul 6, 2015 at 16:24
  • @squint You are correct. I just showed what he can do to have his infinite recursion. And yes, it takes quite a while (Around 50 seconds), but the code is being executed in a non-blocking way, so, it is 'kinda' fine. Jul 6, 2015 at 16:28
  • I see the source article also recommends use of setTimeout as a solution to the stack overflow problem. DO NOT USE setTimeout to solve this problem – for more details, read my examination of the topic: stackoverflow.com/a/43596323/633183
    – Mulan
    Jun 8, 2017 at 15:40
  • 1
    @naomik I'm sorry, but you didn't convince me with your examination. Also, your code is doing god-know-what, while this is doing something much simpler. Also, you didn't mention that the reason why it is so slow is that browsers wait a minimum of 4 milliseconds (used to be 10) even if the timeout is 0 milliseconds. In fact, I even said it is slow (in the comment above). While your examination is valid on it's own, it doesn't matter here: all that matters is infinite recursion. And for that, this answer works just fine, in a non-blocking way. Jun 8, 2017 at 19:33
  • 1
    @naomik Then feel free to add your answer, keeping in mind the state of browsers' support for Promises, ES6 and all that jazz at the time. This was asked 2 years ago and a lot happened since then. In fact, no environment was specified. This means that the code can be meant to run on IE 5.5, Google Chrome 1.0, Netscape or something else. Jun 9, 2017 at 8:00
0

Seems like you are simply looping through an array. Have you tried using a simple for loop?

var list = readHugeList();
for (var i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
    //Do something with list[i]
}
5
  • 1
    This doesn't keep the recursion as the question requires. I'm sure he knows how a for loop works.
    – user1106925
    Jul 6, 2015 at 16:03
  • @squint I agree you would expect nearly all front end web developers to know what a simple for loop is, however his profile says ruby-on-rails developer. Not only that, I've come across a lot developers that try to solve simple problems with complex code more often than not, because that's just how their brain works. Jul 6, 2015 at 16:13
  • Could be. Nevertheless, he specifically wanted to retain recursion (which suggests he knows about imperative solutions). Not saying a for loop isn't sensible. Just saying it really doesn't answer the question. And frankly, there are some problems that are more easily solved with recursion.
    – user1106925
    Jul 6, 2015 at 16:21
  • 1
    @squint Well hopefully the OP will respond to something on here to give an indication either way. If they say "No, I can't do that for reason: X", then I shall remove this answer. Jul 6, 2015 at 16:26
  • Yeah, I hate it when there's a discussions and everyone except the person with the question is present.
    – user1106925
    Jul 6, 2015 at 16:27
0
var taskList = breakBigTaskIntoMicroTasks(monsterTaskList);

// requestAnimationFrame will get executed in each 16ms of duration.
requestAnimationFrame(processTaskList);

function processTaskList(taskStartTime) {
    var taskFinishTime;

    do {
        // Assume the next task is pushed onto a stack.
        var nextTask = taskList.pop();

        // Process nextTask.
        processTask(nextTask);

        // Go again if there’s enough time to do the next task.
        taskFinishTime = window.performance.now();
       } while (taskFinishTime - taskStartTime < 3);
        if (taskList.length > 0)
            requestAnimationFrame(processTaskList);

}
0

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