15

In our setting.xml file we have the following:

<servers>
    <server>
      <id>deploymentRepo</id>
      <username>repouser</username>
      <password>repopwd</password>
    </server>
</servers>

Would it be possible to pass those settings (or their equivalent) via environmental variables instead of the settings.xml?

  • 1
    Security concerns. We do not want those values in a file. – Jose Martinez Jul 6 '15 at 17:23
  • 3
    if you pass the passwords via environment variables they will appear in the process list. Maven has some support to encrypt passwords: maven.apache.org/guides/mini/guide-encryption.html – wemu Jul 6 '15 at 18:38
  • @wemu, thanks for the feedback. we are looking into that also. – Jose Martinez Jul 6 '15 at 18:47
  • Exactly the opposite, cause environment variables are visible go the way as @wemu suggested. – khmarbaise Jul 6 '15 at 18:58
  • 1
    When building on a CI SaaS, using "private variables" to pass secret tokens to builds through the environment is the BKM and considered secure. Editing a "user home file" is considered insecure. – Guss Oct 27 '18 at 16:54
27

Yes, you can do this in two ways:

  • passing properties in command line, using variables. For example, you can use in your settings.xml something like this:
<servers>
    <server>
      <id>deploymentRepo</id>
      <username>${server.username}</username>
      <password>${server.password}</password>
    </server>
</servers>

And in command line, pass these variables in this way:

mvn clean package -Dserver.username=yourusername -Dserver.password=yourpassword
  • exporting environments properties. For example, if you export (in linux, something like export SERVER_USERNAME=yourusername) SERVER_USERNAME and SERVER_PASSWORD variables, you can use like this:
<servers>
    <server>
      <id>deploymentRepo</id>
      <username>${env.SERVER_USERNAME}</username>
      <password>${env.SERVER_PASSWORD}</password>
    </server>
</servers>

For more information about propeties, see the reference documentation.

0

You can pass values from command line

mvn -Dvar=someValue -Dtest.username=xyz install

In the POM file, you can refer to system variables (specified on the command line, or in the pom) as ${var}, and environment variables as ${env.myVariable} i.e,${test.username}

You can also refer to the sure-fire plugin doc

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