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I need to convert std::chrono::time_point to and from a long type (integer 64 bits). I´m starting working with std::chrono ...

Here is my code:

int main ()
{
     std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::system_clock> now = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

    auto epoch = now.time_since_epoch();
    auto value = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(epoch);
    long duration = value.count();


    std::chrono::duration<long> dur(duration);

    std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::system_clock> dt(dur);

    if (dt != now)
        std::cout << "Failure." << std::endl;
    else
        std::cout << "Success." << std::endl;
}

This code compiles, but does not show success.

Why is dt different than now at the end?

What is missing on that code?

2
  • 1
    I'm not too familiar with the chrono library, but I believe you have to use std::chrono::duration<long,std::milli> dur and even then, you might get rounding errors (std::chrono::system_clock has probably a higher resolution than milliseconds).
    – MikeMB
    Commented Jul 6, 2015 at 22:41
  • @MikeMB all clocks on reasonably new hardware should have somewhere around microsecond/sub-microsecond precision anyway. See an article titled The Three Clocks. Really, windows will usually have higher precision with system_clock (around 100 times greater), but even this is usually sub-microsecond.
    – Werlious
    Commented May 26, 2020 at 1:47

4 Answers 4

232
std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::system_clock> now = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

This is a great place for auto:

auto now = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

Since you want to traffic at millisecond precision, it would be good to go ahead and covert to it in the time_point:

auto now_ms = std::chrono::time_point_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(now);

now_ms is a time_point, based on system_clock, but with the precision of milliseconds instead of whatever precision your system_clock has.

auto epoch = now_ms.time_since_epoch();

epoch now has type std::chrono::milliseconds. And this next statement becomes essentially a no-op (simply makes a copy and does not make a conversion):

auto value = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(epoch);

Here:

long duration = value.count();

In both your and my code, duration holds the number of milliseconds since the epoch of system_clock.

This:

std::chrono::duration<long> dur(duration);

Creates a duration represented with a long, and a precision of seconds. This effectively reinterpret_casts the milliseconds held in value to seconds. It is a logic error. The correct code would look like:

std::chrono::milliseconds dur(duration);

This line:

std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::system_clock> dt(dur);

creates a time_point based on system_clock, with the capability of holding a precision to the system_clock's native precision (typically finer than milliseconds). However the run-time value will correctly reflect that an integral number of milliseconds are held (assuming my correction on the type of dur).

Even with the correction, this test will (nearly always) fail though:

if (dt != now)

Because dt holds an integral number of milliseconds, but now holds an integral number of ticks finer than a millisecond (e.g. microseconds or nanoseconds). Thus only on the rare chance that system_clock::now() returned an integral number of milliseconds would the test pass.

But you can instead:

if (dt != now_ms)

And you will now get your expected result reliably.

Putting it all together:

int main ()
{
    auto now = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
    auto now_ms = std::chrono::time_point_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(now);

    auto value = now_ms.time_since_epoch();
    long duration = value.count();

    std::chrono::milliseconds dur(duration);

    std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::system_clock> dt(dur);

    if (dt != now_ms)
        std::cout << "Failure." << std::endl;
    else
        std::cout << "Success." << std::endl;
}

Personally I find all the std::chrono overly verbose and so I would code it as:

int main ()
{
    using namespace std::chrono;
    auto now = system_clock::now();
    auto now_ms = time_point_cast<milliseconds>(now);

    auto value = now_ms.time_since_epoch();
    long duration = value.count();

    milliseconds dur(duration);

    time_point<system_clock> dt(dur);

    if (dt != now_ms)
        std::cout << "Failure." << std::endl;
    else
        std::cout << "Success." << std::endl;
}

Which will reliably output:

Success.

Finally, I recommend eliminating temporaries to reduce the code converting between time_point and integral type to a minimum. These conversions are dangerous, and so the less code you write manipulating the bare integral type the better:

int main ()
{
    using namespace std::chrono;
    // Get current time with precision of milliseconds
    auto now = time_point_cast<milliseconds>(system_clock::now());
    // sys_milliseconds is type time_point<system_clock, milliseconds>
    using sys_milliseconds = decltype(now);
    // Convert time_point to signed integral type
    auto integral_duration = now.time_since_epoch().count();
    // Convert signed integral type to time_point
    sys_milliseconds dt{milliseconds{integral_duration}};
    // test
    if (dt != now)
        std::cout << "Failure." << std::endl;
    else
        std::cout << "Success." << std::endl;
}

The main danger above is not interpreting integral_duration as milliseconds on the way back to a time_point. One possible way to mitigate that risk is to write:

    sys_milliseconds dt{sys_milliseconds::duration{integral_duration}};

This reduces risk down to just making sure you use sys_milliseconds on the way out, and in the two places on the way back in.

And one more example: Let's say you want to convert to and from an integral which represents whatever duration system_clock supports (microseconds, 10th of microseconds or nanoseconds). Then you don't have to worry about specifying milliseconds as above. The code simplifies to:

int main ()
{
    using namespace std::chrono;
    // Get current time with native precision
    auto now = system_clock::now();
    // Convert time_point to signed integral type
    auto integral_duration = now.time_since_epoch().count();
    // Convert signed integral type to time_point
    system_clock::time_point dt{system_clock::duration{integral_duration}};
    // test
    if (dt != now)
        std::cout << "Failure." << std::endl;
    else
        std::cout << "Success." << std::endl;
}

This works, but if you run half the conversion (out to integral) on one platform and the other half (in from integral) on another platform, you run the risk that system_clock::duration will have different precisions for the two conversions.

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  • 1
    @BrentNash: Careful, I might take you up on that. ;-) I'll be at Cppcon 2015 (cppcon.org) talking about this: howardhinnant.github.io/date_v2.html . The subject is very closely related to the time_point_cast<milliseconds>(now) in my answer above. Only the duration is courser: time_point_cast<days>(now). Commented Jul 7, 2015 at 19:57
  • Typo in last comment: coarser, not courser. Great answer though. Commented Dec 7, 2016 at 18:14
  • 2
    The problem with English is that it isn't parsable with a C++ compiler, and the compiler makes a better spell checker. :-) Commented Dec 7, 2016 at 19:23
  • 7
    This is very helpful although I think it would have been a tab bit better if you had not been using 'auto' everywhere. Just for lazy people like me who would like to see what types are being manipulated without having to look elsewhere. Thanks a bunch @HowardHinnant
    – MarkoPaulo
    Commented Oct 4, 2017 at 17:38
  • 1
    To go from system_clock::now() to ms since 1970 in a long: long i = system_clock::now().time_since_epoch()/1ms; Commented Sep 8, 2021 at 17:25
11

I would also note there are two ways to get the number of ms in the time point. I'm not sure which one is better, I've benchmarked them and they both have the same performance, so I guess it's a matter of preference. Perhaps Howard could chime in:

auto now = system_clock::now();

//Cast the time point to ms, then get its duration, then get the duration's count.
auto ms = time_point_cast<milliseconds>(now).time_since_epoch().count();

//Get the time point's duration, then cast to ms, then get its count.
auto ms = duration_cast<milliseconds>(tpBid.time_since_epoch()).count();

The first one reads more clearly in my mind going from left to right.

8

as a single line:

long value_ms = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(std::chrono::time_point_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now()).time_since_epoch()).count();
0

time_point objects only support arithmetic with other time_point or duration objects.

You'll need to convert your long to a duration of specified units, then your code should work correctly.

4
  • Can you post an example?
    – Mendes
    Commented Jul 6, 2015 at 21:24
  • Both of the provided links have an "Example" section at the bottom.
    – Mr. Llama
    Commented Jul 6, 2015 at 21:28
  • I made it compile, but there is some logic error... I´ve editted the original code...
    – Mendes
    Commented Jul 6, 2015 at 21:50
  • 1
    It would benefit the answer to include examples. Links die or change. That being said, I'm not sure why this was downvoted. Commented Sep 6, 2017 at 0:49

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