1

I am following http://automatetheboringstuff.com/chapter6/
At the very bottom of the page is an exercise about formatting tables.

Here is my code:

tableData = [['apples', 'oranges', 'cherries', 'banana'],
         ['Alice', 'Bob', 'Carol', 'David'],
         ['dogs', 'cats', 'moose', 'goose']]

def printTable(table):
    colWidths = [0] * len(table)

    for line in table:
        max = 0
        for word in line:
            if len(word) > max:
                max = len(word)
        colWidths[table.index(line)] = max

    for a in range(len(table)-2):
        for b in range(len(table[0])):
            print(table[a][b].rjust(colWidths[0])+table[a+1][b].rjust(colWidths[1])+table[a+2][b].rjust(colWidths[2]))

    """
    print(table[0][0].rjust(colWidths[0]), table[1][0].rjust(colWidths[1]), table[2][0].rjust(colWidths[2]))
    print(table[0][1].rjust(colWidths[0]), table[1][1].rjust(colWidths[1]), table[2][1].rjust(colWidths[2]))
    print(table[0][2].rjust(colWidths[0]), table[1][2].rjust(colWidths[1]), table[2][2].rjust(colWidths[2]))
    print(table[0][3].rjust(colWidths[0]), table[1][3].rjust(colWidths[1]), table[2][3].rjust(colWidths[2]))
    """
    print()

printTable(tableData)

The commented out lines format everything how it should be. The actual code does not. For it to be formatted correctly, I would need to add 1 to .rjust() for each column (eg with 100 columns I would have to .rjust(colWidths[1]+99)).

Why does this happen when it seems to be working just fine when I just manually print?

1
  • Have you tried using commas to separate table values in the for loop print statement like you did in the manual print statements? More info here. – Hayley Guillou Jul 7 '15 at 0:33
2

The print statement in the for loop uses string concatenation:

print(table[a][b].rjust(colWidths[0])+table[a+1][b].rjust(colWidths[1])+table[a+2][b].rjust(colWidths[2]))

Concatenation creates each string in memory, and then combines them together at their ends in a new string. Spaces will not be added between items and that is why you would need to add one character for each column before it.

The commented out lines in your code use commas to separate the arguments:

"""
print(table[0][0].rjust(colWidths[0]), table[1][0].rjust(colWidths[1]), table[2][0].rjust(colWidths[2]))
print(table[0][1].rjust(colWidths[0]), table[1][1].rjust(colWidths[1]), table[2][1].rjust(colWidths[2]))
print(table[0][2].rjust(colWidths[0]), table[1][2].rjust(colWidths[1]), table[2][2].rjust(colWidths[2]))
print(table[0][3].rjust(colWidths[0]), table[1][3].rjust(colWidths[1]), table[2][3].rjust(colWidths[2]))
"""

The print statement with commas separating items, uses a space to separate them. This is probably why your columns line up correctly.

This answer explains it in more detail.

1

Your part of code where you struggled is quite similar to mine and mine works.

def printTable(List):
    colWidths = [0] * len(tableData)

    for line in range(len(tableData)):
        for word in range(len(tableData[line])):
            if colWidths[line] <= len(tableData[line][word]):
                colWidths[line] = len(tableData[line][word])
            else:
                colWidths[line] = colWidths[line]

#this is the part where you struggled
    for li in range(len(tableData[0])):
        for i in range(len(tableData)):
            print(tableData[i][li].rjust(colWidths[i]), end =" ")
        print()
1

Since the content of each individual list defines the necessary width per column, you can perform len(max(tableData[x])) in a loop to get the maximum length per column. Append this to a list and it is easily transmittable:

tableData = [['apples', 'oranges', 'cherries', 'banana'],
             ['Alice', 'Bob', 'Carol', 'David'],
             ['dogs', 'cats', 'moose', 'goose']]

colWidth = []

def printTable(table):
    for x in range(len(table)):
        colWidth.append(len(max(table[x],key=len))+1)       

    for x in range(len(table[0])):
        for i in range(len(table)):
            print (table [i][x].rjust(colWidth[i]), end = " ")
        print()

printTable(tableData)
1

Below is the code I used to find the longest string in the table and to print the table

tableData = [['apples', 'orange', 'cherries', 'banana'],
         ['Alice', 'Bob', 'Carol', 'David'],
         ['dogs', 'cats', 'moose', 'goose']]

def printTable(table):

    strName = ''
    maxLen = -1
    # Find longest string in table
    for y in range(len(table[0])):
                 
            for x in range(len(table)): 
                   strName = table[x][y]
                   if len(strName) > maxLen:
                   maxLen = len(strName) + 1

    # Print table   
    for y in range(len(table[0])):
    
            newTable = ''           
            for x in range(len(table)): 
                newTable = newTable + (table[x][y].ljust(maxLen))                 
            print(newTable)
                  

printTable(tableData) # Call function
0

Here's my code, which is finally working after a week bugging me and chasing me in my dreams:

tableData = [['apples', 'oranges', 'cherries', 'banana'],
             ['Alice', 'Bobolon', 'Carolina', 'Davidovv'],
             ['dogsee', 'puscats', 'moosara', 'gooseano']]

def printTable(table):
    colwidths=[0]*len(table)
    for i in range(len(table)):
        for j in range(len(table[i])):
            if len(table[i][j])>colwidths[i]:
                colwidths[i]=len(table[i][j])

    for line in range(len(table[0])): #PYTHON PRINTS LINE PER LINE. NOT COLUMN PER COLUMN.ABOUT TABLE[0]: IT IS ESTABLISHED THAT ALL ITEMS IN TABLEDATA WILL HVE THE SAME LENGTH, SO THAT IT DOESNT MATTER WETHER YOU PUT [0], [1] OR [2] BECAUSE THEY ALL HAVE LENGTH OF 4 ITEMS (IN CASE OF THE TABLEDATA LIST
        for column in range(len(table)): #THERE ARE AS MANY COLUMNS AS ITEMS(LISTS) IN TABLEDATA
            print(table[column][line].ljust(colwidths[column]*2),end=" ") #NOW, WE PRINT THE FIRST WORD OF THE FIRST COLUMN, FOLLOWED BUYT THE FIRST WORD OF THE SECOND COLUMN AND SO ON. .END= HELPS WITH NOT HAVING TO CONCATENATE THESE AND KEEPING ITEMS IN THE SAME LINE.
        print() #WITHOUT THIS PRINT (WHICH PRINTS A NEW LINE), ALL ITEMS WOULD BE IN THE SAME LINE, DUE TO THE PREVIOS .END=

printTable(tableData)
-1
tableData = [['apples', 'oranges', 'cherries', 'bananas'],
            ['Alice', 'Bob', 'Caroline', 'David'],
            ['dogs', 'cats', 'moose', 'goose']]
#To calculate the length of the longest word in the table
colwid = 0
for j in range(len(tableData[0])):
    for i in range(len(tableData)):
        if colwid < len(tableData[i][j]):
            colwid = len(tableData[i][j])
        i = i + 1
    j = j + 1
#Print the table with each field left justified with column length from above
for j in range(len(tableData[0])):
    for i in range(len(tableData)):
        print(tableData[i][j].ljust(colwid), end=' ')
        i = i + 1
    j = j + 1
    print()
1
  • 1
    Thank you for your answer. Any explanation on your contribution would be much appreciated. What did you add, how does it work, etc. This will be helpful for users to understand how to start from your code and adapt it to another situation. – Léonard Sep 27 '20 at 21:29

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