2

Is there someone that knows what the computational cost for this two pieces of code is?

while (n > 2)
   n = sqrt(n);

while (n > 2)
   n = log(n);
2
  • No, it's just my curiosity ( i see the question in a forum and i became curios). :) – BlackShadow Jun 27 '10 at 11:17
  • It rather depends what the representation of n is - for arbitrary precision, sqrt(n) is itself O(log n) – Pete Kirkham Jun 28 '10 at 10:54
9

The second would be O(log* n) where log * is the iterated logarithm.

Analysing the first one yields something like this:

sqrt(n) = n ^ (1/2)
sqrt(sqrt(n)) = n ^ (1/4)
sqrt(sqrt(sqrt(n))) = n ^ (1/8)
...
sqrt applied k times = n ^ (1/2^k)

Consider that the first algorithm executes k times (basically, the number of times we have to apply sqrt until n <= 2).

Consider this reasoning:

n ^ (1/2^k) = p (p <= 2) | ^ (2^k)
n = p ^ (2^k) | log
log n = (2^k) log p | log
log log n = log (2 ^ k) + log log p
log log n = klog2 + log log p
=> k ~= log log n

So the first algorithm is O(log log n).

3
  • I also thought the same thing(something like log2(log2(n)) but I was not sure, for the second? – BlackShadow Jun 27 '10 at 11:33
  • @BlackShadow - simply use these formulas: 1. sqrt(n) = n ^ (1/2); 2. (a^b)^c = a^(b*c); 3. log (a*b) = log a + log b; 4. log (a^b) = b*log a. This is all you need to prove it. – IVlad Jun 27 '10 at 11:39
  • I guess you used also properites of big-O to remove "1/log 2" and "log log p / log 2". – ony Jun 27 '10 at 12:26
4

The answer to the first one should become obvious if one recasts it in the log domain:

n = log2(n);
while (n > 1)
    n = n / 2;

How many times do you need to halve a number in order to reach 1? O(log n).

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