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I have a project with lots of ugly code I've written some time ago. Now I'm trying to make it testable and to use TDD for further development. But every time I'm trying to write unit tests for existing code I'm getting stuck. I just don't know how to test my old code. I can't write any little test. It makes me sick. So can anyone show me what tests to write for function like this to make further refactoring painless:

public void ChangeHealth(UInt16 id, HealthTypes health, FighterCount count)
{
    var uc = new FighterCommand {Health = health, KillerId = 1024};
    Fighter f;
    switch(count)
    {
        case FighterCount.All:
            if (Fight.GetInstance().Status == FightStatuses.Enable)
            {
                foreach (var u in Fighters.Elements)
                    uc.AddUnit(u.Id);
            }
            FightEvents.StatusUnit(null, health);
            _sender.SendCommand_AppServer(uc);
            break;
        case FighterCount.NotEqual:
            for (var i = Fighters.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                f = Fighters.GetUnit(i);
                if (health == f.Health) continue;
                uc.AddUnit(f.Id);
                FightEvents.StatusUnit(f, health);
            }
            if (uc.UnitCount > 0) _sender.SendCommand_AppServer(uc);
            break;
        default:
            f = Fighters.GetById(id);
            uc.AddUnit(f.Id);
            FightEvents.StatusUnit(f, health);
            _sender.SendCommand_AppServer(uc);
            break;
    }
}
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    IMO, test the new code but don't touch or test the legacy one unless really necessary. There are already some ways (Ex: Sprout/Wrap methods) to deal with this. If it wasn't designed to be maintainable in the first place, it's not worth the effort of converting it (But do test your new stuff). – Pierre-Luc Pineault Jul 7 '15 at 18:31
  • But what if I need to add functionality to this method? Or change it? – pingvincible Jul 7 '15 at 18:39
  • As I said there's already ways to deal with legacy code. For starters, you could take a look at the sprout method I mentioned. There are other ways to deal with it cleanly, just look around on the web or in specialized books. – Pierre-Luc Pineault Jul 7 '15 at 18:43
  • 4
    If the code is critical to the business and you really need to change something in there, there's a wide range of techniques you can use to get legacy code under test so you can refactor safely. Note that this will require quite an investment. You can check out the blog series by Adrian Bolboaca here which should give you some pointers. The techniques that Pierre-Luc mentions can be found in Michael Feathers' book Working Effectively With Legacy Code. – prgmtc Jul 7 '15 at 19:03
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Take a look at the "golden master" technique by Michael Feathers. The idea is that you throw input at your untestable code, record the output or the state of your program. Then you can refactor and throw the same input and observe the same output or internal state (with the exception of the minor incremental change you've made). Bit by bit the code becomes more testable. Explained in further depth at http://blog.thecodewhisperer.com/2014/09/28/surviving-legacy-code-with-golden-master-and-sampling/

A tool for dumping the state of your application is https://github.com/kbilsted/StatePrinter where you simply can say

var printer = new Stateprinter();
Console.WriteLine( printer.PrintObject( myProgram) );

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