27

My objective is to find the sum of all numbers from 4 to 666554 which consists of 4,5,6 only.

SUM = 4+5+6+44+45+46+54+55+56+64+65+66+.....................+666554.

Simple method is to run a loop and add the numbers made of 4,5 and 6 only.

long long sum = 0;
for(int i=4;i <=666554;i++){
   /*check if number contains only 4,5 and 6.
     if condition is true then add the number to the sum*/
}

But it seems to be inefficient. Checking that the number is made up of 4,5 and 6 will take time. Is there any way to increase the efficiency. I have tried a lot but no new approach i have found.Please help.

14
  • 2
    A bit of searching on the web makes this really easy to find: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arithmetic_progression#Sum for details. And yes, even SO has this question covered already. Just do a little more research next time.
    – user707650
    Jul 8, 2015 at 7:00
  • 13
    @Evert: I'm pretty sure the question you linked is not the same.
    – Dair
    Jul 8, 2015 at 7:02
  • 3
    @Julo0sS: Regex is not efficient.
    – Dair
    Jul 8, 2015 at 7:06
  • 2
    @Dair, ahaha! My bad, I went mostly by the title.
    – user707650
    Jul 8, 2015 at 7:53
  • 3
    You're right, this can be calculated without constructing the numbers. Hint: Let g(n) be the sum of all 456-numbers with exactly n digits. Write down a recurrence relation for g. Jul 8, 2015 at 14:02

6 Answers 6

46

For 1-digit numbers, note that

4 + 5 + 6 == 5 * 3

For 2-digits numbers:

(44 + 45 + 46) + (54 + 55 + 56) + (64 + 65 + 66)
== 45 * 3 + 55 * 3 + 65 * 3
== 55 * 9

and so on.

In general, for n-digits numbers, there are 3n of them consist of 4,5,6 only, their average value is exactly 5...5(n digits). Using code, the sum of them is ('5' * n).to_i * 3 ** n (Ruby), or int('5' * n) * 3 ** n (Python).

You calculate up to 6-digits numbers, then subtract the sum of 666555 to 666666.


P.S: for small numbers like 666554, using pattern matching is fast enough. (example)

6
  • If I've made no mistake with your idea, the result should be 409632209.
    – Bentoy13
    Jul 8, 2015 at 7:31
  • What's the formula for n-digit numbers? I can't see it from the examples. Jul 8, 2015 at 13:36
  • 4
    @ColonelPanic In code, ('5' * n).to_i * 3 ** n (Ruby) or int('5' * n) * 3 ** n (Python).
    – Yu Hao
    Jul 8, 2015 at 14:35
  • 1
    @YuHao; You should add your comment to the answer to generalize the concept.
    – haccks
    Jul 8, 2015 at 17:26
  • Cheers. For posterity, you can also write that without string operations (10**n-1)*5//9 * 3**n Jul 10, 2015 at 11:26
5

Implement a counter in base 3 (number of digit values), e.g. 0,1,2,10,11,12,20,21,22,100.... and then translate the base-3 number into a decimal with the digits 4,5,6 (0->4, 1->5, 2->6), and add to running total. Repeat until the limit.

def compute_sum(digits, max_val):

  def _next_val(cur_val):
    for pos in range(len(cur_val)):
      cur_val[pos]+=1
      if cur_val[pos]<len(digits):
        return
      cur_val[pos]=0
    cur_val.append(0)

  def _get_val(cur_val):
    digit_val=1
    num_val=0
    for x in cur_val:
      num_val+=digits[x]*digit_val
      digit_val*=10
    return num_val

  cur_val=[]
  sum=0
  while(True):
    _next_val(cur_val)
    num_val=_get_val(cur_val)
    if num_val>max_val:
      break
    sum+=num_val
  return sum

def main():
  digits=[4,5,6]
  max_val=666554
  print(digits, max_val)
  print(compute_sum(digits, max_val))
3
  • I was thinking on these lines but I don't think the translation to decimal is particularly trivial, in particular for larger numbers. I think you need to provide the translation method.
    – Bathsheba
    Jul 8, 2015 at 8:26
  • 1
    the method _get_val in the code above translates from base-3 to decimal wrt the given digit values
    – gen-y-s
    Jul 8, 2015 at 9:11
  • maybe people don't know what are nested methods, so they don't understand the code, despite the clarity and simplicity (not to mention elegance) ?
    – gen-y-s
    Jul 8, 2015 at 10:32
5

Mathematics are good, but not all problems are trivially "compressible", so knowing how to deal with them without mathematics can be worthwhile.


In this problem, the summation is trivial, the difficulty is efficiently enumerating the numbers that need be added, at first glance.

The "filter" route is a possibility: generate all possible numbers, incrementally, and filter out those which do not match; however it is also quite inefficient (in general):

  • the condition might not be trivial to match: in this case, the easier way is a conversion to string (fairly heavy on divisions and tests) followed by string-matching
  • the ratio of filtering is not too bad to start with at 30% per digit, but it scales very poorly as gen-y-s remarked: for a 4 digits number it is at 1%, or generating and checking 100 numbers to only get 1 out of them.

I would therefore advise a "generational" approach: only generate numbers that match the condition (and all of them).

I would note that generating all numbers composed of 4, 5 and 6 is like counting (in ternary):

  • starts from 4
  • 45 becomes 46 (beware of carry-overs)
  • 66 becomes 444 (extreme carry-over)

Let's go, in Python, as a generator:

def generator():
    def convert(array):
        i = 0
        for e in array:
            i *= 10
            i += e
        return i

    def increment(array):
        result = []
        carry = True

        for e in array[::-1]:
            if carry:
                e += 1
                carry = False
            if e > 6:
                e = 4
                carry = True
            result = [e,] + result

        if carry:
            result = [4,] + result

        return result

    array = [4]
    while True:
        num = convert(array)
        if num > 666554: break

        yield num
        array = increment(array)

Its result can be printed with sum(generator()):

$ time python example.py
409632209
python example.py  0.03s user 0.00s system 82% cpu 0.043 total

And here is the same in C++.

3
  • The filtering ratio is 30% per digit. So for a 4 digit number the ratio is less than 0.1%
    – gen-y-s
    Jul 8, 2015 at 17:36
  • @gen-y-s: Oh! Good catch! Jul 9, 2015 at 5:58
  • @MatthieuM. - gen-y-s is actually wrong. It's less then 1%, not 0.1% (still low obviously). Kind of obvious really, for example, between 100 & 1000 you'd have 444, 445, 446, 454... much more then 1, in fact it will be 27.
    – Amit
    Nov 13, 2015 at 6:56
2

"Start with a simpler problem." —Polya

Sum the n-digit numbers which consist of the digits 4,5,6 only

As Yu Hao explains above, there are 3**n numbers and their average by symmetry is eg. 555555, so the sum is 3**n * (10**n-1)*5/9. But if you didn't spot that, here's how you might solve the problem another way.

The problem has a recursive construction, so let's try a recursive solution. Let g(n) be the sum of all 456-numbers of exactly n digits. Then we have the recurrence relation:

g(n) = (4+5+6)*10**(n-1)*3**(n-1) + 3*g(n-1)

To see this, separate the first digit of each number in the sum (eg. for n=3, the hundreds column). That gives the first term. The second term is sum of the remaining digits, one count of g(n-1) for each prefix of 4,5,6.

If that's still unclear, write out the n=2 sum and separate tens from units:

g(2) = 44+45+46 + 54+55+56 + 64+65+66
     = (40+50+60)*3 + 3*(4+5+6)
     = (4+5+6)*10*3 + 3*g(n-1)

Cool. At this point, the keen reader might like to check Yu Hao's formula for g(n) satisfies our recurrence relation.

To solve OP's problem, the sum of all 456-numbers from 4 to 666666 is g(1) + g(2) + g(3) + g(4) + g(5) + g(6). In Python, with dynamic programming:

def sum456(n):
    """Find the sum of all numbers at most n digits which consist of 4,5,6 only"""
    g = [0] * (n+1)
    for i in range(1,n+1):
        g[i] = 15*10**(i-1)*3**(i-1) + 3*g[i-1]
    print(g) # show the array of partial solutions
    return sum(g)

For n=6

>>> sum456(6)
[0, 15, 495, 14985, 449955, 13499865, 404999595]
418964910

Edit: I note that OP truncated his sum at 666554 so it doesn't fit the general pattern. It will be less the last few terms

>>> sum456(6) - (666555 + 666556 + 666564 + 666565 + 666566 + 666644 + 666645 + 666646 + 666654 + 666655 + 666656 + + 666664 + 666665 + 666666)
409632209
4
  • Using a magic number 9332701 there... why not simply def sum456(): return 409632209 then?
    – SparK
    Jul 8, 2015 at 22:50
  • how to prove recurrence relation by induction or any other method. Jul 9, 2015 at 3:31
  • @DeepakYadav the proof of the recurrence relation is above (rearranging a sum and grouping it differently is a common trick). Do you mean solve it (as a function of n)? That would be cool, I don't know how though. Jul 9, 2015 at 10:56
  • @SparK OP's sum is truncated compared to the general pattern with the neat mathematical properties. I doubt there's any clever way to calculate the difference. Jul 9, 2015 at 11:01
0

The sum of 4 through 666666 is:

total = sum([15*(3**i)*int('1'*(i+1)) for i in range(6)])
>>> 418964910

The sum of the few numbers between 666554 and 666666 is:

rest = 666555+666556+666564+666565+666566+
666644+666645+666646+
666654+666655+666656+
666664+666665+666666
>>> 9332701

total - rest
>>> 409632209
0

Java implementation of question:- This uses the modulo(10^9 +7) for the answer.

public static long compute_sum(long[] digits, long max_val, long count[]) {
    List<Long> cur_val = new ArrayList<>();
    long sum = 0;
    long mod = ((long)Math.pow(10,9))+7;
    long num_val = 0;
    while (true) {
        _next_val(cur_val, digits);
        num_val = _get_val(cur_val, digits, count);
        sum =(sum%mod + (num_val)%mod)%mod;
        if (num_val == max_val) {
            break;
        }

    }
    return sum;
}

public static void _next_val(List<Long> cur_val, long[] digits) {
    for (int pos = 0; pos < cur_val.size(); pos++) {
        cur_val.set(pos, cur_val.get(pos) + 1);
        if (cur_val.get(pos) < digits.length)
            return;
        cur_val.set(pos, 0L);
    }

    cur_val.add(0L);
}

public static long _get_val(List<Long> cur_val, long[] digits, long count[]) {
    long digit_val = 1;
    long num_val = 0;
    long[] digitAppearanceCount = new long[]{0,0,0};
    for (Long x : cur_val) {
        digitAppearanceCount[x.intValue()] = digitAppearanceCount[x.intValue()]+1;
        if (digitAppearanceCount[x.intValue()]>count[x.intValue()]){
            num_val=0;
            break;
        }
        num_val = num_val+(digits[x.intValue()] * digit_val);
        digit_val *= 10;
    }
    return num_val;
}


public static void main(String[] args) {

    long [] digits=new long[]{4,5,6};
    long count[] = new long[]{1,1,1};
    long max_val= 654;

    System.out.println(compute_sum(digits, max_val, count));
}

The Answer by @gen-y-s (https://stackoverflow.com/a/31286947/8398943) is wrong (It includes 55,66,44 for x=y=z=1 which is exceeding the available 4s, 5s, 6s). It gives output as 12189 but it should be 3675 for x=y=z=1.

The logic by @Yu Hao (https://stackoverflow.com/a/31285816/8398943) has the same mistake as mentioned above. It gives output as 12189 but it should be 3675 for x=y=z=1.

0

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