83

Python pandas has a pct_change function which I use to calculate the returns for stock prices in a dataframe:

ndf['Return']= ndf['TypicalPrice'].pct_change()

I am using the following code to get logarithmic returns, but it gives the exact same values as the pct.change() function:

ndf['retlog']=np.log(ndf['TypicalPrice'].astype('float64')/ndf['TypicalPrice'].astype('float64').shift(1))
#np is for numpy
0

5 Answers 5

104

Here is one way to calculate log return using .shift(). And the result is similar to but not the same as the gross return calculated by pct_change(). Can you upload a copy of your sample data (dropbox share link) to reproduce the inconsistency you saw?

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

np.random.seed(0)
df = pd.DataFrame(100 + np.random.randn(100).cumsum(), columns=['price'])
df['pct_change'] = df.price.pct_change()
df['log_ret'] = np.log(df.price) - np.log(df.price.shift(1))

Out[56]: 
       price  pct_change  log_ret
0   101.7641         NaN      NaN
1   102.1642      0.0039   0.0039
2   103.1429      0.0096   0.0095
3   105.3838      0.0217   0.0215
4   107.2514      0.0177   0.0176
5   106.2741     -0.0091  -0.0092
6   107.2242      0.0089   0.0089
7   107.0729     -0.0014  -0.0014
..       ...         ...      ...
92  101.6160      0.0021   0.0021
93  102.5926      0.0096   0.0096
94  102.9490      0.0035   0.0035
95  103.6555      0.0069   0.0068
96  103.6660      0.0001   0.0001
97  105.4519      0.0172   0.0171
98  105.5788      0.0012   0.0012
99  105.9808      0.0038   0.0038

[100 rows x 3 columns]
7
  • I'm getting a lot of values in pct_change() and log_ret exactly the same, and a very few values which are slightly different. Would that be expected?
    – AmanArora
    Commented Jul 8, 2015 at 8:56
  • 9
    @AmanArora Yes, that's an expected behaviour. log return and gross return are very very close when your gross return is small, say less than 1%. It can be mathematically proved by 2nd-order Taylor expansion around 0.
    – Jianxun Li
    Commented Jul 8, 2015 at 9:00
  • 11
    @AmanArora BTW, log return has the desired property that it is additive over time (but not additive over different assets), whereas gross return is most appropriate when you calculate a weighted average portfolio return (that is additive over different assets but not additive over time).
    – Jianxun Li
    Commented Jul 8, 2015 at 9:02
  • This calculates the log twice, rather than using .diff ()
    – poulter7
    Commented Aug 28, 2017 at 1:56
  • 5
    @poulter7 .dif() provides the absolute change between 2 rows. Also note that np.log(df.price) - np.log(df.price.shift(1)) is equivalent to np.log(df.price / df.price.shift(1)) (one log operation)
    – Paul P M
    Commented May 23, 2018 at 20:45
58

Log returns are simply the natural log of 1 plus the arithmetic return. So how about this?

df['pct_change'] = df.price.pct_change()
df['log_return'] = np.log(1 + df.pct_change)

Even more concise, utilizing Ximix's suggestion:

df['log_return'] = np.log1p(df.price.pct_change())
3
  • 3
    Maybe you can use np.log1p: df['log_return'] = np.log1p(df.pct_change)
    – Ximix
    Commented May 31, 2018 at 11:52
  • 3
    This is certainly mathematically incorrect "Log returns are simply the natural log of 1 plus the arithmetic return. "
    – Daniel
    Commented Nov 6, 2020 at 12:18
  • What am I doing incorrectly? Or perhaps, what do I mean to say?
    – EpicAdv
    Commented Oct 15, 2021 at 20:10
41

Single line, and only calculating logs once. First convert to log-space, then take the 1-period diff.

    np.diff(np.log(df.price))

In earlier versions of numpy:

    np.log(df.price)).diff()
2
  • 1
    it works but shows PyLint message "Instance of 'ndarray' has no 'diff' member"
    – irriss
    Commented Mar 23, 2020 at 9:28
  • 1
    This highlights a change in the numpy API, .diff() is not available on the array itself in the latest versions of numpy. Instead np.diff is the preferred approach. Updated the answer to reflect this.
    – poulter7
    Commented Mar 23, 2020 at 12:07
12

The results might seem similar, but that is just because of the Taylor expansion for the logarithm. Since log(1 + x) ~ x, the results can be similar.

However,

I am using the following code to get logarithmic returns, but it gives the exact same values as the pct.change() function.

is not quite correct.

import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame({'p': range(10)})

df['pct_change'] = df.pct_change()
df['log_stuff'] = \
    np.log(df['p'].astype('float64')/df['p'].astype('float64').shift(1))
df[['pct_change', 'log_stuff']].plot();

enter image description here

8

@poulter7: I cannot comment on the other answers, so I post it as new answer: be careful with

np.log(df.price).diff() 

as this will fail for indices which can become negative as well as risk factors e.g. negative interest rates. In these cases

np.log(df.price/df.price.shift(1)).dropna()

is preferred and based on my experience generally the safer approach. It also evaluates the logarithm only once.

Whether you use +1 or -1 depends on the ordering of your time series. Use -1 for descending and +1 for ascending dates - in both cases the shift provides the preceding date's value.

1
  • 2
    This is interesting, there are two approaches here, np.log(1+s.pct_change()) and np.log(s/s.shift(1)), which are equivalent, once the series crosses into negative territory the log returns start to make some sense again. Or np.log(s).diff()) and (np.log(s) - np.log(s.shift(1)), which explicitly drop negative returns.
    – poulter7
    Commented Apr 24, 2018 at 14:54

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