106

What is the simplest way to get monitor resolution (preferably in a tuple)?

  • Are you using a particular UI toolkit? (eg. GTK, wxPython, Tkinter, etc) – detly Jun 28 '10 at 2:25
  • 9
    With the Tkinter module, you can do it this way. It's part of the standard Python library and works on most Unix and Windows platforms. – martineau Oct 17 '10 at 19:44
  • 1
    A good overview over different techniques for common UIs is given at this link – ImportanceOfBeingErnest May 21 '17 at 18:41

27 Answers 27

61

On Windows:

from win32api import GetSystemMetrics

print("Width =", GetSystemMetrics(0))
print("Height =", GetSystemMetrics(1))

If you are working with high resolution screen, make sure your python interpreter is HIGHDPIAWARE.

Based on this post.

  • 9
    For multiplatform complete solution, refer to this answer – Dhruv Reshamwala Sep 20 '16 at 6:20
  • 1
    When using multiple monitors, this will only return the size of the primary display. – Stevoisiak Jul 31 '18 at 19:57
  • 1
    How do you set the python interpreter to be highdpiaware? This would be useful to include in the answer. – eric Jan 19 '19 at 21:44
108

In Windows, you can also use ctypes with GetSystemMetrics():

import ctypes
user32 = ctypes.windll.user32
screensize = user32.GetSystemMetrics(0), user32.GetSystemMetrics(1)

so that you don't need to install the pywin32 package; it doesn't need anything that doesn't come with Python itself.

For multi-monitor setups, you can retrieve the combined width and height of the virtual monitor:

import ctypes
user32 = ctypes.windll.user32
screensize = user32.GetSystemMetrics(78), user32.GetSystemMetrics(79)
  • 8
    Important note: the values returned may be incorrect if DPI scaling is used (ie: often the case on 4k displays), you have to call SetProcessDPIAware before initializing the GUI components (and not before calling the GetSystemMetrics function). This is true for most of the answers here (GTK, etc) on the win32 platform. – totaam Sep 29 '14 at 4:09
  • 1
    For multiple monitors, you may use GetSystemMetrics(78) and GetSystemMetrics(79) – Derek Jul 20 '18 at 18:00
  • @Derek What does GetSystemMetrics(78) and GetSystemMetrics(79) return? – Stevoisiak Jul 30 '18 at 15:12
  • @StevenVascellaro The width/height of the virtual screen, in pixels. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… – Derek Jul 30 '18 at 20:42
77

I created a PyPI module for this reason:

pip install screeninfo

The code:

from screeninfo import get_monitors
for m in get_monitors():
    print(str(m))

Result:

monitor(1920x1080+1920+0)
monitor(1920x1080+0+0)

It supports multi monitor environments. Its goal is to be cross platform; for now it supports Cygwin and X11 but pull requests are totally welcome.

  • 1
    Works great on Windows but Mac I get the following Error: ImportError: Could not load X11 – Chris Lucian Jan 15 '16 at 5:11
  • 3
    Works great on Ubuntu. Tested on Ubuntu 16.04. – Dhruv Reshamwala Sep 20 '16 at 6:21
  • 2
    FYI, Windows DPI scaling still applies. This line will tell Windows you want the raw, unscaled resolution: "import ctypes; user32 = ctypes.windll.user32; user32.SetProcessDPIAware()". 1) Your answer should be top; good job. 2) My comment is Windows-specific, not library specific (i.e. screeninfo) 3) code ripped and tested from KobeJohn's comment here: stackoverflow.com/a/32541666/2616321 – Jason2616321 Jul 17 '17 at 17:28
  • 5
    Handy module (+1). I had to install a couple of requirements (e.g. pip install cython pyobjus) before I could use it on OSX though – George Profenza Mar 8 '19 at 3:13
44

If you're using wxWindows, you can simply do:

import wx

app = wx.App(False) # the wx.App object must be created first.    
print(wx.GetDisplaySize())  # returns a tuple
  • This is the best one... who don't have wx? :) plus a few lines instead a bunch of code on your eyes. This is now my default method, thank you. – m3nda Oct 26 '15 at 11:59
  • 1
    This should be app = wx.App(False) otherwise you get the "the wx.App object must be created first." error. 26 votes and no one did check? Does work in Windows without assing wx instance to a variable? – m3nda Oct 26 '15 at 12:23
  • 2
    Who don't have wx? Many people? – marsh Sep 16 '16 at 13:40
41

Taken directly from an answer to this post: How to get the screen size in Tkinter?

import tkinter as tk

root = tk.Tk()

screen_width = root.winfo_screenwidth()
screen_height = root.winfo_screenheight()
  • 7
    If you have external displays extended to beside the primary display, this method would give the sum of all displays resolutions, not the current display resolution. – jadelord Jul 25 '16 at 10:08
  • For a multiple screen step see my answer. – norok2 Jul 6 '19 at 10:00
24

On Windows 8.1 I am not getting the correct resolution from either ctypes or tk. Other people are having this same problem for ctypes: getsystemmetrics returns wrong screen size To get the correct full resolution of a high DPI monitor on windows 8.1, one must call SetProcessDPIAware and use the following code:

import ctypes
user32 = ctypes.windll.user32
user32.SetProcessDPIAware()
[w, h] = [user32.GetSystemMetrics(0), user32.GetSystemMetrics(1)]

Full Details Below:

I found out that this is because windows is reporting a scaled resolution. It appears that python is by default a 'system dpi aware' application. Types of DPI aware applications are listed here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/dn469266%28v=vs.85%29.aspx#dpi_and_the_desktop_scaling_factor

Basically, rather than displaying content the full monitor resolution, which would make fonts tiny, the content is scaled up until the fonts are big enough.

On my monitor I get:
Physical resolution: 2560 x 1440 (220 DPI)
Reported python resolution: 1555 x 875 (158 DPI)

Per this windows site: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa770067%28v=vs.85%29.aspx The formula for reported system effective resolution is: (reported_px*current_dpi)/(96 dpi) = physical_px

I'm able to get the correct full screen resolution, and current DPI with the below code. Note that I call SetProcessDPIAware() to allow the program to see the real resolution.

import tkinter as tk
root = tk.Tk()

width_px = root.winfo_screenwidth()
height_px = root.winfo_screenheight() 
width_mm = root.winfo_screenmmwidth()
height_mm = root.winfo_screenmmheight() 
# 2.54 cm = in
width_in = width_mm / 25.4
height_in = height_mm / 25.4
width_dpi = width_px/width_in
height_dpi = height_px/height_in 

print('Width: %i px, Height: %i px' % (width_px, height_px))
print('Width: %i mm, Height: %i mm' % (width_mm, height_mm))
print('Width: %f in, Height: %f in' % (width_in, height_in))
print('Width: %f dpi, Height: %f dpi' % (width_dpi, height_dpi))

import ctypes
user32 = ctypes.windll.user32
user32.SetProcessDPIAware()
[w, h] = [user32.GetSystemMetrics(0), user32.GetSystemMetrics(1)]
print('Size is %f %f' % (w, h))

curr_dpi = w*96/width_px
print('Current DPI is %f' % (curr_dpi))    

Which returned:

Width: 1555 px, Height: 875 px
Width: 411 mm, Height: 232 mm
Width: 16.181102 in, Height: 9.133858 in
Width: 96.099757 dpi, Height: 95.797414 dpi
Size is 2560.000000 1440.000000
Current DPI is 158.045016

I am running windows 8.1 with a 220 DPI capable monitor. My display scaling sets my current DPI to 158.

I'll use the 158 to make sure my matplotlib plots are the right size with: from pylab import rcParams rcParams['figure.dpi'] = curr_dpi

  • You have a lot of good information here, but the answer itself is buried in the middle. To make it a bit easier to read, can you clarify exactly what the answer is and then provide the background information? – skrrgwasme Oct 23 '14 at 23:49
  • I edited my post to show the answer in the beginning, then get into the details. Thanks for the feedback. – spacether Oct 24 '14 at 4:49
  • 1
    It looks like there is a flaw in the calculations here, which is easy to spot it you calculate a diagonal size from the reported width and height (in inches). My screen with 13.3 inches diagonal was reported as 15 inch. It seems Tkinter is using correct pixels, but is not aware of the dpi scaling thus reporting wrong mm sizes. – Primer Apr 2 '15 at 9:35
  • This doesn't work on Windows 10, there the SetSystemDPIAware() doesn't seem to make a difference. However, calling ctypes.windll.shcore.SetProcessDpiAwareness(2) instead seems to do the trick. – Klamer Schutte Sep 22 '17 at 7:35
  • @KlamerSchutte: ctypes.windll.shcore.SetProcessDpiAwareness(2) returns error OSError: [WinError 126] The specified module could not be found. – Adrian Keister Oct 3 '18 at 17:27
19

And for completeness, Mac OS X

import AppKit
[(screen.frame().size.width, screen.frame().size.height)
    for screen in AppKit.NSScreen.screens()]

will give you a list of tuples containing all screen sizes (if multiple monitors present)

  • Thanks! It works for mac like a charm! – Victor Oct 25 '19 at 10:18
14

If you are using the Qt toolkit specifically PySide, you can do the following:

from PySide import QtGui
import sys

app = QtGui.QApplication(sys.argv)
screen_rect = app.desktop().screenGeometry()
width, height = screen_rect.width(), screen_rect.height()
13

Using Linux, the simplest way is to execute bash command

xrandr | grep '*'

and parse its output using regexp.

Also you can do it through PyGame: http://www.daniweb.com/forums/thread54881.html

  • How do you use pygame to get the screen resolution? – Jamie Twells May 20 '14 at 23:12
11

Here is a quick little Python program that will display the information about your multi-monitor setup:

import gtk

window = gtk.Window()

# the screen contains all monitors
screen = window.get_screen()
print "screen size: %d x %d" % (gtk.gdk.screen_width(),gtk.gdk.screen_height())

# collect data about each monitor
monitors = []
nmons = screen.get_n_monitors()
print "there are %d monitors" % nmons
for m in range(nmons):
  mg = screen.get_monitor_geometry(m)
  print "monitor %d: %d x %d" % (m,mg.width,mg.height)
  monitors.append(mg)

# current monitor
curmon = screen.get_monitor_at_window(screen.get_active_window())
x, y, width, height = monitors[curmon]
print "monitor %d: %d x %d (current)" % (curmon,width,height)  

Here's an example of its output:

screen size: 5120 x 1200
there are 3 monitors
monitor 0: 1600 x 1200
monitor 1: 1920 x 1200
monitor 2: 1600 x 1200
monitor 1: 1920 x 1200 (current)
  • Does gtk.Window() get the gdk_default_root_window? Is that how you are certain .get_screen contains all monitors? – yatg Jul 17 '15 at 0:15
  • I ask because in my code Im trying to replicate your code, i am doing it in jsctypes, and it keeps telling me 0 monitors: gist.github.com/yajd/55441c9c3d0711ee4a38#file-gistfile1-txt-L3 – yatg Jul 17 '15 at 1:19
  • 2
    It's a while since I wrote that code but, if I recall correctly, what gtk.Window() does is create a new window (see here). The window's just a way to use get_screen to get the monitor information. It returns the screen that the window is on (or would be, if it were ever displayed). I guess it depends on the X configuration whether that "screen" contains all "monitors". It does on my system with Twinview. – starfry Jul 17 '15 at 10:43
  • Thanks @starfry! I needed to find a cross solution which gets all monitors and their dimensions regardless of screens. Have you had any chacne to develop something like that? :) – yatg Jul 17 '15 at 17:30
  • Alternative for later toolkit versions: ```python – satyagraha Aug 17 '19 at 12:27
9

I am using a get_screen_resolution method in one of my projects like the one below, which is basically an import chain. You can modify this according to Your needs by removing those parts that are not needed and move more likely ports upwards in the chain.

PYTHON_V3 = sys.version_info >= (3,0,0) and sys.version_info < (4,0,0):
#[...]
    def get_screen_resolution(self, measurement="px"):
        """
        Tries to detect the screen resolution from the system.
        @param measurement: The measurement to describe the screen resolution in. Can be either 'px', 'inch' or 'mm'. 
        @return: (screen_width,screen_height) where screen_width and screen_height are int types according to measurement.
        """
        mm_per_inch = 25.4
        px_per_inch =  72.0 #most common
        try: # Platforms supported by GTK3, Fx Linux/BSD
            from gi.repository import Gdk 
            screen = Gdk.Screen.get_default()
            if measurement=="px":
                width = screen.get_width()
                height = screen.get_height()
            elif measurement=="inch":
                width = screen.get_width_mm()/mm_per_inch
                height = screen.get_height_mm()/mm_per_inch
            elif measurement=="mm":
                width = screen.get_width_mm()
                height = screen.get_height_mm()
            else:
                raise NotImplementedError("Handling %s is not implemented." % measurement)
            return (width,height)
        except:
            try: #Probably the most OS independent way
                if PYTHON_V3: 
                    import tkinter 
                else:
                    import Tkinter as tkinter
                root = tkinter.Tk()
                if measurement=="px":
                    width = root.winfo_screenwidth()
                    height = root.winfo_screenheight()
                elif measurement=="inch":
                    width = root.winfo_screenmmwidth()/mm_per_inch
                    height = root.winfo_screenmmheight()/mm_per_inch
                elif measurement=="mm":
                    width = root.winfo_screenmmwidth()
                    height = root.winfo_screenmmheight()
                else:
                    raise NotImplementedError("Handling %s is not implemented." % measurement)
                return (width,height)
            except:
                try: #Windows only
                    from win32api import GetSystemMetrics 
                    width_px = GetSystemMetrics (0)
                    height_px = GetSystemMetrics (1)
                    if measurement=="px":
                        return (width_px,height_px)
                    elif measurement=="inch":
                        return (width_px/px_per_inch,height_px/px_per_inch)
                    elif measurement=="mm":
                        return (width_px/mm_per_inch,height_px/mm_per_inch)
                    else:
                        raise NotImplementedError("Handling %s is not implemented." % measurement)
                except:
                    try: # Windows only
                        import ctypes
                        user32 = ctypes.windll.user32
                        width_px = user32.GetSystemMetrics(0)
                        height_px = user32.GetSystemMetrics(1)
                        if measurement=="px":
                            return (width_px,height_px)
                        elif measurement=="inch":
                            return (width_px/px_per_inch,height_px/px_per_inch)
                        elif measurement=="mm":
                            return (width_px/mm_per_inch,height_px/mm_per_inch)
                        else:
                            raise NotImplementedError("Handling %s is not implemented." % measurement)
                    except:
                        try: # Mac OS X only
                            import AppKit 
                            for screen in AppKit.NSScreen.screens():
                                width_px = screen.frame().size.width
                                height_px = screen.frame().size.height
                                if measurement=="px":
                                    return (width_px,height_px)
                                elif measurement=="inch":
                                    return (width_px/px_per_inch,height_px/px_per_inch)
                                elif measurement=="mm":
                                    return (width_px/mm_per_inch,height_px/mm_per_inch)
                                else:
                                    raise NotImplementedError("Handling %s is not implemented." % measurement)
                        except: 
                            try: # Linux/Unix
                                import Xlib.display
                                resolution = Xlib.display.Display().screen().root.get_geometry()
                                width_px = resolution.width
                                height_px = resolution.height
                                if measurement=="px":
                                    return (width_px,height_px)
                                elif measurement=="inch":
                                    return (width_px/px_per_inch,height_px/px_per_inch)
                                elif measurement=="mm":
                                    return (width_px/mm_per_inch,height_px/mm_per_inch)
                                else:
                                    raise NotImplementedError("Handling %s is not implemented." % measurement)
                            except:
                                try: # Linux/Unix
                                    if not self.is_in_path("xrandr"):
                                        raise ImportError("Cannot read the output of xrandr, if any.")
                                    else:
                                        args = ["xrandr", "-q", "-d", ":0"]
                                        proc = subprocess.Popen(args,stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
                                        for line in iter(proc.stdout.readline,''):
                                            if isinstance(line, bytes):
                                                line = line.decode("utf-8")
                                            if "Screen" in line:
                                                width_px = int(line.split()[7])
                                                height_px = int(line.split()[9][:-1])
                                                if measurement=="px":
                                                    return (width_px,height_px)
                                                elif measurement=="inch":
                                                    return (width_px/px_per_inch,height_px/px_per_inch)
                                                elif measurement=="mm":
                                                    return (width_px/mm_per_inch,height_px/mm_per_inch)
                                                else:
                                                    raise NotImplementedError("Handling %s is not implemented." % measurement)
                                except:
                                    # Failover
                                    screensize = 1366, 768
                                    sys.stderr.write("WARNING: Failed to detect screen size. Falling back to %sx%s" % screensize)
                                    if measurement=="px":
                                        return screensize
                                    elif measurement=="inch":
                                        return (screensize[0]/px_per_inch,screensize[1]/px_per_inch)
                                    elif measurement=="mm":
                                        return (screensize[0]/mm_per_inch,screensize[1]/mm_per_inch)
                                    else:
                                        raise NotImplementedError("Handling %s is not implemented." % measurement)
  • 1
    Thanks for sharing this, but it could have been shortened a lot by using a function to handle the if-else cases – Udayraj Deshmukh Jul 24 '17 at 19:55
7

Old question but this is missing. I'm new to python so please tell me if this is a "bad" solution. This solution is supported for Windows and MacOS only and it works just for the main screen - but the os is not mentioned in the question.

Measure the size by taking a screenshot. As the screensize should not change this has to be done only once. There are more elegant solutions if you have a gui toolkit like GTK, wx, ... installed.

see Pillow

pip install Pillow

from PIL import ImageGrab

img = ImageGrab.grab()
print (img.size)
6

XWindows version:

#!/usr/bin/python

import Xlib
import Xlib.display

resolution = Xlib.display.Display().screen().root.get_geometry()
print str(resolution.width) + "x" + str(resolution.height)
5

Try the following code:

import subprocess
resuls = subprocess.Popen(['xrandr'],stdout=subprocess.PIPE).communicate()[0].split("current")[1].split(",")[0]
width = resuls.split("x")[0].strip()
heigth = resuls.split("x")[1].strip()
print width + "x" + heigth
5

In case you have PyQt4 installed, try the following code:

from PyQt4 import QtGui
import sys

MyApp = QtGui.QApplication(sys.argv)
V = MyApp.desktop().screenGeometry()
h = V.height()
w = V.width()
print("The screen resolution (width X height) is the following:")
print(str(w) + "X" + str(h))

For PyQt5, the following will work:

from PyQt5 import QtWidgets
import sys

MyApp = QtWidgets.QApplication(sys.argv)
V = MyApp.desktop().screenGeometry()
h = V.height()
w = V.width()
print("The screen resolution (width X height) is the following:")
print(str(w) + "X" + str(h))
4

Expanding on @user2366975's answer, to get the current screen size in a multi-screen setup using Tkinter (code in Python 2/3):

try:
    # for Python 3
    import tkinter as tk
except ImportError:
    # for Python 2
    import Tkinter as tk


def get_curr_screen_geometry():
    """
    Workaround to get the size of the current screen in a multi-screen setup.

    Returns:
        geometry (str): The standard Tk geometry string.
            [width]x[height]+[left]+[top]
    """
    root = tk.Tk()
    root.update_idletasks()
    root.attributes('-fullscreen', True)
    root.state('iconic')
    geometry = root.winfo_geometry()
    root.destroy()
    return geometry

(Should work cross-platform, tested on Linux only)

3

Using Linux Instead of regexp take the first line and take out the current resolution values.

Current resolution of display :0

>>> screen = os.popen("xrandr -q -d :0").readlines()[0]
>>> print screen
Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1920 x 1080, maximum 1920 x 1920
>>> width = screen.split()[7]
>>> print width
1920
>>> height = screen.split()[9][:-1]
>>> print height
1080
>>> print "Current resolution is %s x %s" % (width,height)
Current resolution is 1920 x 1080

This was done on xrandr 1.3.5, I don't know if the output is different on other versions, but this should make it easy to figure out.

  • sadly not very good with multimonitor setups. not python's fault, but using this may have unexpected results... – black_puppydog May 18 '13 at 20:38
2

To get bits per pixel:

import ctypes
user32 = ctypes.windll.user32
gdi32 = ctypes.windll.gdi32

screensize = (user32.GetSystemMetrics(0), user32.GetSystemMetrics(1))
print "screensize =%s"%(str(screensize))
dc = user32.GetDC(None);

screensize = (gdi32.GetDeviceCaps(dc,8), gdi32.GetDeviceCaps(dc,10), gdi32.GetDeviceCaps(dc,12))
print "screensize =%s"%(str(screensize))
screensize = (gdi32.GetDeviceCaps(dc,118), gdi32.GetDeviceCaps(dc,117), gdi32.GetDeviceCaps(dc,12))
print "screensize =%s"%(str(screensize))

parameters in gdi32:

#/// Vertical height of entire desktop in pixels
#DESKTOPVERTRES = 117,
#/// Horizontal width of entire desktop in pixels
#DESKTOPHORZRES = 118,
#/// Horizontal width in pixels
#HORZRES = 8,
#/// Vertical height in pixels
#VERTRES = 10,
#/// Number of bits per pixel
#BITSPIXEL = 12,
2

Try pyautogui:

import pyautogui
resolution = pyautogui.size()
print(resolution) 
  • You should really add some explanation as to why this code should work - you can also add comments in the code itself - in its current form, it does not provide any explanation which can help the rest of the community to understand what you did to solve/answer the question. But this is also a very old question - with an accepted answer... – ishmaelMakitla Aug 15 '16 at 20:45
2

Another version using xrandr:

import re
from subprocess import run, PIPE

output = run(['xrandr'], stdout=PIPE).stdout.decode()
result = re.search(r'current (\d+) x (\d+)', output)
width, height = map(int, result.groups()) if result else (800, 600)
2

Using pygame:

import pygame
pygame.init()
infos = pygame.display.Info()
screen_size = (infos.current_w, infos.current_h)

[1]

However, if you're trying to set your window to the size of the screen, you might just want to do:

pygame.display.set_mode((0,0),pygame.FULLSCREEN)

to set your display to fullscreen mode. [2]

  • Confirmed it works on Windows :) What a nice non-Windows specific method! – Lukasz Czerwinski Aug 31 '18 at 10:42
1

You could use PyMouse. To get the screen size just use the screen_size() attribute:

from pymouse import PyMouse
m = PyMouse()
a = m.screen_size()

a will return a tuple, (X, Y), where X is the horizontal position and Y is the vertical position.

Link to function in documentation.

1

A cross platform and easy way to do this is by using TKinter that comes with nearly all the python versions so you don't have to install anything:

import tkinter
root = tkinter.Tk()
root.withdraw()
WIDTH, HEIGHT = root.winfo_screenwidth(), root.winfo_screenheight()
1

If you are working on Windows OS, you can use OS module to get it:

import os
cmd = 'wmic desktopmonitor get screenheight, screenwidth'
size_tuple = tuple(map(int,os.popen(cmd).read().split()[-2::]))

It will return a tuple (Y,X) where Y is the vertical size and X is the horizontal size. This code works on Python 2 and Python 3

0

On Linux we can use subprocess module

import subprocess
cmd = ['xrandr']
cmd2 = ['grep', '*']
p = subprocess.Popen(cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
p2 = subprocess.Popen(cmd2, stdin=p.stdout, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
p.stdout.close()

resolution_string, junk = p2.communicate()
resolution = resolution_string.split()[0]
resolution = resolution.decode("utf-8") 
width = int(resolution.split("x")[0].strip())
heigth = int(resolution.split("x")[1].strip())
0

It's a little troublesome for retina screen, i use tkinter to get the fake size, use pilllow grab to get real size :

import tkinter
root = tkinter.Tk()
resolution_width = root.winfo_screenwidth()
resolution_height = root.winfo_screenheight()
image = ImageGrab.grab()
real_width, real_height = image.width, image.height
ratio_width = real_width / resolution_width
ratio_height = real_height/ resolution_height
0

For later versions of PyGtk:

import gi
gi.require_version("Gdk", "3.0")
from gi.repository import Gdk

display = Gdk.Display.get_default()
n_monitors = display.get_n_monitors()
print("there are %d monitors" % n_monitors)
for m in range(n_monitors):
  monitor = display.get_monitor(m)
  geometry = monitor.get_geometry()
  print("monitor %d: %d x %d" % (m, geometry.width, geometry.height))

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