44

Currently, I am trying to use Dapper ORM with Unit Of Work + Repository Pattern.

I want to use Unit of Work as opposed to a simple dapper Repository due to the fact that my insert and updates require a degree of transaction processing. I have been unable to find any useful examples as most seem to use Entity Framework and have leakage issue within the Unit of Work.

Could someone please point me in the right direction?

  • 1
    Dapper is not an ORM. The UoW is the db transaction. The repository will use dapper to work with the db. – MikeSW Jul 9 '15 at 13:40
  • 5
    Dapper is a micro ORM, I undserstand that the UOW is the transaction, but I am looking for a good example of Dapper utilising the UOW pattern. – Stig Jul 10 '15 at 7:32
  • 1
    The micro ORM is a misnomer, it's basically a data mapper. A good example of dapper using uow pattern is any db transaction. And don't use patterns you don't understand yet, you'll only complicate your life. Understand what the repository is, understand what the Uow is (read the actual definitions) and then use them if you have those specific problems. Many devs are using the UoW/repository combo in a very wrong way. Don't be like them. – MikeSW Jul 10 '15 at 13:17
  • That is exactly why I want to use UOW pattern as my Inserts and updates do require transaction processing. Looking my current implementation of the UOW the pattern requires the closing of the db connection when the UOW is disposed. This just doesn’t feel quite right. – Stig Jul 10 '15 at 14:21
  • 1
    It feels right to me. Actually you should close it as son as you've finished the transaction – MikeSW Jul 10 '15 at 15:51
41

This Git project is very helpful. I started from the same and did some changes as per my need.

public sealed class DalSession : IDisposable
{
    public DalSession()
    {
        _connection = new OleDbConnection(DalCommon.ConnectionString);
        _connection.Open();
        _unitOfWork = new UnitOfWork(_connection);
    }

    IDbConnection _connection = null;
    UnitOfWork _unitOfWork = null;

    public UnitOfWork UnitOfWork
    {
        get { return _unitOfWork; }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _unitOfWork.Dispose();
        _connection.Dispose();
    }
}

public sealed class UnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork
{
    internal UnitOfWork(IDbConnection connection)
    {
        _id = Guid.NewGuid();
        _connection = connection;
    }

    IDbConnection _connection = null;
    IDbTransaction _transaction = null;
    Guid _id = Guid.Empty;

    IDbConnection IUnitOfWork.Connection
    {
        get { return _connection; }
    }
    IDbTransaction IUnitOfWork.Transaction
    {
        get { return _transaction; }
    }
    Guid IUnitOfWork.Id
    {
        get { return _id; }
    }

    public void Begin()
    {
        _transaction = _connection.BeginTransaction();
    }

    public void Commit()
    {
        _transaction.Commit();
        Dispose();
    }

    public void Rollback()
    {
        _transaction.Rollback();
        Dispose();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if(_transaction != null)
            _transaction.Dispose();
        _transaction = null;
    }
}

interface IUnitOfWork : IDisposable
{
    Guid Id { get; }
    IDbConnection Connection { get; }
    IDbTransaction Transaction { get; }
    void Begin();
    void Commit();
    void Rollback();
}

Now, your repositories should accept this UnitOfWork in some way. I choose Dependency Injection with Constructor.

public sealed class MyRepository
{
    public MyRepository(IUnitOfWork unitOfWork) 
    {
        this.unitOfWork = unitOfWork;
    }

    IUnitOfWork unitOfWork = null;

    //You also need to handle other parameters like 'sql', 'param' ect. This is out of scope of this answer.
    public MyPoco Get()
    {
        return unitOfWork.Connection.Query(sql, param, unitOfWork.Transaction, .......);
    }

    public void Insert(MyPoco poco)
    {
        return unitOfWork.Connection.Execute(sql, param, unitOfWork.Transaction, .........);
    }
}

And then you call it like this:

With transaction:

using(DalSession dalSession = new DalSession())
{
    UnitOfWork unitOfWork = dalSession.UnitOfWork;
    unitOfWork.Begin();
    try
    {
        //Your database code here
        MyRepository myRepository = new MyRepository(unitOfWork);
        myRepository.Insert(myPoco);
        //You may create other repositories in similar way in same scope of UoW.

        unitOfWork.Commit();
    }
    catch
    {
        unitOfWork.Rollback();
        throw;
    }
}

Without Transaction:

using(DalSession dalSession = new DalSession())
{
    //Your database code here
    MyRepository myRepository = new MyRepository(dalSession.UnitOfWork);//UoW have no effect here as Begin() is not called.
    myRepository.Insert(myPoco);
}

Please note that, UnitOfWork is more than DBTransaction.

More details about Repository in above code could be found here.

I have already post this code here. But this question looks more relevant to me for this code; so I am posting again instead of just link to original answer.

| improve this answer | |
  • If we are going to unit test the class UnitOfWork, how would that work? Do we have to mock Connection and Transaction? How would we mock unitOfWork.Connection.Execute() for example? – kkuilla Mar 14 '18 at 14:23
  • 1
    @kkuilla: I perform Integration Tests on classes related to Data Access Layer. Those tests work on actual Connection; I do not need to mock it. Performing DB operations is primary purpose of DAL. Unit testing it by mocking the dependencies does not serve primary purpose. Have a look at this post. – Amit Joshi Mar 14 '18 at 14:40
  • My repositories are injected into my service constructors which I don't think will work with this as you're new'ing up your repositories inside the using statement and passing the unit of work. I'd also rather only have my repositories taking a dbconnection as that's all it needs. Any ideas of a way around this? – Andy Furniss Apr 3 '18 at 15:36
  • The using statement code is just for example how you can use it. I do not any reason why you cannot inject it in Service; it could be done very well. Actually, I am doing same thing in my live project. About UoW; if just IDbConnection suits your needs, then that should not be an issue either. Just bypass UoW and inject connection directly. – Amit Joshi Apr 3 '18 at 17:02
  • 1
    @Sherlock: I am not aware about your complete scenario; but in context of this answer, there should not be any problem using complex queries with similar design. Dapper does not generate queries for you; you write the query. So, complicity of query does not matter. About relevance of repository itself? Sorry but I cannot say. It depends on so many factors and of-course a personal choice as well. – Amit Joshi Oct 17 '19 at 13:18
24

Edit 2018-08-03: Amit's comment really got me thinking, and made me realize that the repository's don't in fact NEED to be properties on the context itself. But rather, repositories could have a dependency on the context. Rather than continue to make incremental changes to the code samples below. I will simply reference a git repo I've put together to contain this concept.

Standing on the shoulders of others here.

Considering this answer is top in most Google searches pertaining to "dapper" and "unit of work". I wanted to provide my approach, which I've used to great effect several times now.

Using a ficitious (and overly simplified) example:

public interface IUnitOfWorkFactory
{
    UnitOfWork Create();
}

public interface IDbContext 
{
    IProductRepository Product { get; set; }

    void Commit();
    void Rollback();
}

public interface IUnitOfWork
{
    IDbTransaction Transaction { get;set; }

    void Commit();
    void Rollback();
}


public interface IProductRepository 
{
    Product Read(int id);
}

Note how neither IDbContext or IUnitOfWorkFactory implements IDisposable. This is purposefully done to avoid a leaky abstraction. Instead the reliance is on Commit()/Rollback() to take care of cleanup and disposal.

A couple of points before sharing implementations.

  • IUnitOfWorkFactory is responsible for instantiating the UnitOfWork and brokering the database connection.
  • IDbContext is the repository backbone.
  • IUnitOfWork is an encapsulation of IDbTransaction, and ensures that when working with multiple repositories, they share a single database context.

Implementation of IUnitOfWorkFactory

public class UnitOfWorkFactory<TConnection> : IUnitOfWorkFactory where TConnection : IDbConnection, new()
{
    private string connectionString;

    public UnitOfWorkFactory(string connectionString)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(connectionString))
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("connectionString cannot be null");
        }

        this.connectionString = connectionString;
    }

    public UnitOfWork Create()
    {
        return new UnitOfWork(CreateOpenConnection());
    }

    private IDbConnection CreateOpenConnection()
    {
        var conn = new TConnection();
        conn.ConnectionString = connectionString;

        try
        {
            if (conn.State != ConnectionState.Open)
            {
                conn.Open();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            throw new Exception("An error occured while connecting to the database. See innerException for details.", exception);
        }

        return conn;
    }
}

Implementation of IDbContext

public class DbContext : IDbContext
{
    private IUnitOfWorkFactory unitOfWorkFactory;

    private UnitOfWork unitOfWork;

    private IProductRepository product;

    public DbContext(IUnitOfWorkFactory unitOfWorkFactory)
    {
        this.unitOfWorkFactory = unitOfWorkFactory;
    }

    public ProductRepository Product =>
        product ?? (product = new ProductRepository(UnitOfWork));

    protected UnitOfWork UnitOfWork =>
        unitOfWork ?? (unitOfWork = unitOfWorkFactory.Create());

    public void Commit()
    {
        try
        {
            UnitOfWork.Commit();
        }
        finally
        {
            Reset();
        }
    }

    public void Rollback()
    {
        try
        {
            UnitOfWork.Rollback();
        }
        finally
        {
            Reset();
        }
    }

    private void Reset()
    {
        unitOfWork = null;
        product = null;
    }
}

Implementation of IUnitOfWork

public class UnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork
{
    private IDbTransaction transaction;

    public UnitOfWork(IDbConnection connection)
    {
        transaction = connection.BeginTransaction();
    }

    public IDbTransaction Transaction =>
        transaction;

    public void Commit()
    {
        try
        {
            transaction.Commit();
            transaction.Connection?.Close();
        }
        catch
        {
            transaction.Rollback();
            throw;
        }
        finally
        {
            transaction?.Dispose();
            transaction.Connection?.Dispose();
            transaction = null;
        }
    }

    public void Rollback()
    {
        try
        {
            transaction.Rollback();
            transaction.Connection?.Close();
        }
        catch
        {
            throw;
        }
        finally
        {
            transaction?.Dispose();
            transaction.Connection?.Dispose();
            transaction = null;
        }
    }
}

Implementation of IProductRepository

public class ProductRepository : IProductRepository
{
    protected readonly IDbConnection connection;
    protected readonly IDbTransaction transaction;

    public ProductRepository(UnitOfWork unitOfWork)
    {
      connection = unitOfWork.Transaction.Connection;
      transaction = unitOfWork.Transaction;
    }

    public Product Read(int id)
    {
        return connection.QuerySingleOrDefault<Product>("select * from dbo.Product where Id = @id", new { id }, transaction: Transaction);
    }
}

To access the database, simply instantiate DbContext or inject using the IoC container of your choice (I personnally use the IoC container provided by .NET Core).

var unitOfWorkFactory = new UnitOfWorkFactory<SqlConnection>("your connection string");
var db = new DbContext(unitOfWorkFactory);

Product product = null;

try 
{
    product = db.Product.Read(1);
    db.Commit();
}
catch (SqlException ex)
{
    //log exception
    db.Rollback();
}

The explicit need for Commit() for this simple read-only operation seems excessive, but pays dividends as the system grows. And apparently, offers a minor performance benefit according to Sam Saffron. You "can" also omit the db.Commit() on simple read operations, by doing this though you leaving the connection hanging open and put the onus of cleaning things up onto the garbage collector. So this isn't recommended.

I typically bring the DbContext into the fold at the service-tier, where it works in unison with other services to form the "ServiceContext". I then reference this ServiceContext in the actual MVC layer.

As another point of mention, it's recommended to use async throughout the stack if you can. It is omitted here for simplicity.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Do I need to instantiate all my repositories in DbContext class? If it is so, it violates SRP then. I have to change this class every time new repository is introduced. – Amit Joshi Jun 1 '18 at 8:13
  • There’s nothing stoppng you from injecting IServiceProvider (for .net core) into the class and maintaining a hashtable of repos. But you still need to update something when you add a new repository, in this case the IoC container. Ive done it both ways. I did the former here for simplicity. You could also use reflection. But that may not scale well. – pimbrouwers Jun 1 '18 at 10:29
  • @pimbrouwers how to use async and await here? – Hameed Syed Oct 27 '18 at 12:14
  • @pimbrouwers thank you for the code. It is very well structured. Can you please provide a usage sample for MVC5 and Unity IoC. – user1770849 Nov 7 '18 at 21:28
  • Is there any reason IUnitOfWorkFactory.Create does not return the IUnitOfWork interface instead of the UnitOfWork class? – Søren Pedersen Sep 11 '19 at 7:29
3

Okay, it's been half a decade since the OP asked, but as I keep coming across this question when I develop with Dapper (or anything really, this isn't really very Dapper specific). Here's my two cents.

First Let's talk about the other answers:

pimbrouwers' answer IDbContext manages Unit of Work in a very similar way to how entity framework does it. It's perfectly sensible and easy to understand. But the major drawback is that you end up passing a IDbContext to all your business code. It's a bit of a god object. Just like in EF. I prefer to inject individual repositories and make it explicit what database stuff I'm going to be doing, instead of having everything in my domain model always just one . away. However, if you don't agree with my 'god object' objection, pim's answer sounds like the right one for you.

Amit Joshi's answer has the MyRepository take the unit of work as a constructor parameter. This means you can't inject Repositories anymore. This can be solved by injecting repository factories instead, but this is certainly its own level of hassle.

A quick aside: In some of these answers the word "transaction" and "unit of work" are used interchangeably. In practice here they have a 1:1 relationship, but they aren't the same thing. The "transaction" is the db implementation, the "unit of work" is more of a higher level conceptual thing. If we had more persistence that just one database, there would be a difference, and the UOW would contain more than just one transaction. So, to avoid confusion, "Transaction" is probably not a great word to use in our UOW interface.

So here's my way:

I'll start with the Usage

// Business code. I'm going to write a method, but a class with dependencies is more realistic
static async Task MyBusinessCode(IUnitOfWorkContext context, EntityRepoitory repo)
{
    var expectedEntity = new Entity {Id = null, Value = 10};

    using (var uow = context.Create())
    {
        expectedEntity.Id = await repo.CreateAsync(expectedEntity.Value);
        await uow.CommitAsync();
    }

    using (context.Create())
    {
         var entity = await repo.GetOrDefaultAsync(expectedEntity.Id.Value);
         entity.Should().NotBeNull();
         entity.Value.Should().Be(expectedEntity.Value);
    }
}

The unit of work just wraps a transaction and is shortlived:

public class UnitOfWork : IDisposable
{

    private readonly SQLiteTransaction _transaction;
    public SQLiteConnection Connection { get; }

    public bool IsDisposed { get; private set; } = false;

    public UnitOfWork(SQLiteConnection connection)
    {
        Connection = connection;
        _transaction = Connection.BeginTransaction();
    }

    public async Task RollBackAsync()
    {
        await _transaction.RollbackAsync();
    }

    public async Task CommitAsync()
    {
        await _transaction.CommitAsync();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _transaction?.Dispose();

        IsDisposed = true;
    }
}

The Context is more interesting. It's the way in which the repos and the unit of works communicate behind the scenes.

There's one interface for the business code to manage a unit of work, and one for the repo to abide by that unit of work.

public class UnitOfWorkContext : IUnitOfWorkContext, IConnectionContext
{
    private readonly SQLiteConnection _connection;
    private UnitOfWork _unitOfWork;

    private bool IsUnitOfWorkOpen => !(_unitOfWork == null || _unitOfWork.IsDisposed);

    public UnitOfWorkContext(SQLiteConnection connection)
    {
        _connection = connection;
    }

    public SQLiteConnection GetConnection()
    {
        if (!IsUnitOfWorkOpen)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException(
                "There is not current unit of work from which to get a connection. Call BeginTransaction first");
        }

        return _unitOfWork.Connection;
    }

    public UnitOfWork Create()
    {
        if (IsUnitOfWorkOpen)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException(
                "Cannot begin a transaction before the unit of work from the last one is disposed");
        }

        _unitOfWork = new UnitOfWork(_connection);
        return _unitOfWork;
    }
}

public interface IConnectionContext
{
    SQLiteConnection GetConnection();
}

public interface IUnitOfWorkContext
{
    UnitOfWork Create();
}

Here's how the repo does that:

public class EntityRepository
{
    private readonly IConnectionContext _context;

    public EntityRepository(IConnectionContext context)
    {
        _context = context;
    }

    public async Task<int> CreateAsync(int value)
    {
        return await _context.GetConnection().QuerySingleAsync<int>(
            @"
insert into Entity (Value) values (@value);
select last_insert_rowid();
", new { value });
    }

    public async Task<Entity> GetOrDefaultAsync(int id)
    {
        return await _context.GetConnection().QuerySingleOrDefaultAsync<Entity>(
            @"
select * from Entity where Id = @id
", new { id });
    }
}

And finally here's DI. Do the setup. Here's a single threaded console application Example. I imagine it would be sensible to make it a singleton or per request. The implementation of UnitOfWorkContext can be changed to match your threading choices anyway (Eg by using a UnitOfWorkContext with a thread static UOW).

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    using (var connection = new SQLiteConnection("Data Source=:memory:"))
    {
        connection.Open();
        Setup(connection);
        var context = new UnitOfWorkContextContext(connection);
        var repo = new EntityRepository(context);

        MyBusinessCode(repo, context).ConfigureAwait(false).GetAwaiter().GetResult();
    }
}

Full version on Github: https://github.com/NathanLBCooper/unit-of-work-example

Analysis:

We've eliminated god objects and don't need to create factories for all our repositories. the cost is that we've got a little bit more of a subtle non-obvious link between our repos and the Unit of Work stuff. There's no boiler plate, but we do need to be careful about what lifetime we give our context object, especially when multithreading.

I think this is a trade-off that's worth it, but that's me.

PS

I'll add one thing. Maybe you've looked up this answer because you've started using dapper. Right now all your repository methods are separate atomic operations and you feel no need to combine them into transactions yet. Then for the time being you don't need to do any of this. Close this browser window, write your repositories in the most simple and obvious way and be happy.

| improve this answer | |
0

I noticed in your github repo you removed the UnitOfWorkFactory and instead instantiate it when accessing the Connection

Problem with this approach that i can't wrap my head around is.

Imagine the following scenario, if i register DBContext as Scoped and Repositories as Transient

1. UserService CreateUserProfile
    a. UserRepositoryGetByEmail("some@email.com")
    b. UserRepository.Add(user)
    c. AddressRepository.Add(new address)
2. UserService Commit?

In this case all of (1.) above is a single transaction and then I want to commit in (2.)

With a large business layer with multiple services using the same scoped instance of dbcontext I can see transactions overlapping

Now I could set dbcontext as Transient but then UnitOfWork would be different on each injection and it wouldn't work.

| improve this answer | |
0

There is no need for a hand-rolled solution for this. What you want can be achieved very simply using the classes already in the framework.

/// <summary>
/// Register a single instance using whatever DI system you like.
/// </summary>
class ConnectionFactory
{
    private string _connectionString;

    public ConnectionFactory(string connectionString)
    {
        _connectionString = connectionString;
    }

    public IDbConnection CreateConnection()
    {
        return new SqlConnection(_connectionString);
    }
}


/// <summary>
/// Generally, in a properly normalized database, your repos wouldn't map to a single table,
/// but be an aggregate of data from several tables.
/// </summary>
class ProductRepo
{
    private ConnectionFactory _connectionFactory;

    public ProductRepo(ConnectionFactory connectionFactory)
    {
        _connectionFactory = connectionFactory;
    }

    public Product Get(int id)
    {
        // Allow connection pooling to worry about connection lifetime, that's its job.
        using (var con = _connectionFactory.CreateConnection())
        {
            return con.Get<Product>(id);
        }
    }

    // ...
}

class OrderRepo
{
    // As above.
    // ...
}

class ProductController : ControllerBase
{
    private ProductRepo _productRepo;
    private OrderRepo _orderRepo;

    public ProductController(ProductRepo productRepo, OrderRepo orderRepo)
    {
        _productRepo = productRepo;
        _orderRepo = orderRepo;
    }

    [HttpGet]
    public Task<IAsyncResult> Get(int id)
    {
        // This establishes your transaction.
        // Default isolation level is 'serializable' which is generally desirable and is configurable.
        // Enable async flow option in case subordinate async code results in a thread continuation switch.
        // If you don't need this transaction here, don't use it, or put it where it is needed.
        using (var trn = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeAsyncFlowOption.Enabled))
        {
            Product product = _productRepo.Get(id);

            // Use additional repositories and do something that actually requires an explicit transaction.
            // A single SQL statement does not require a transaction on SQL Server due to default autocommit mode.
            // ...

            return Ok(product);
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Neat approach! Like it! – pimbrouwers Apr 16 at 14:57
  • 1
    The question was about UnitOfWork pattern, not how to use TransactionScope – Moises Alexander Salazar Vila Jul 11 at 22:12
  • And my point is, that unless you wish to add additional features to the UnitOfWork abstraction, like change tracking, which none of the other answers here do, and instead just use a UnitOfWork abstraction that provides simple transactioning, then that can be achieved quite simply without handrolling a custom UnitOfWork abstraction since the framework provided TransactionScope type provides that already. – Neutrino Jul 13 at 10:34
  • I'd also add, that if you do need change tracking, then unless you already know you are going to need to optimize heavily for performance you might as well bite the bullet and use Entity Framework or some other library that provides it out of the box, otherwise you are going to end up maintaining, testing and debugging a lot of (probably unnecessary) bespoke framework code. – Neutrino Jul 13 at 10:39
  • This could work in .NET Framework, but not .NET Core until there is a resolution to github.com/dotnet/runtime/issues/715 – Rob Johnston Jul 23 at 17:39

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