8

I practicing in swift's playground and I couldn't figure out why swift is too specific about where programmer should provide spaces and where not. I asked this question on many sites and chatrooms but didn't got any answer.

var j: Int = 34 // Right
var j:Int=23 //Wrong

Also, In class

self.variable-= 5 //Wrong. Error: Consecutive statements must be followed by ;
self.variable-=5 // Right
self.variable -= 5 // Right

;

Even this ":" creates some issues with spaces sometimes.

I think spaces should have absolutely no effect on the code. It's usually just for a programmer's benefit. It just makes the code more readable nothing else. What's the best resource to read all swift rules about spaces.

17

Answer to the second part of your question can be found here swift docs

The whitespace around an operator is used to determine whether an operator is used as a prefix operator, a postfix operator, or a binary operator. This behavior is summarized in the following rules:

If an operator has whitespace around both sides or around neither side, it is treated as a binary operator. As an example, the + operator in a+b and a + b is treated as a binary operator.

If an operator has whitespace on the left side only, it is treated as a prefix unary operator. As an example, the ++ operator in a ++b is treated as a prefix unary operator.

If an operator has whitespace on the right side only, it is treated as a postfix unary operator. As an example, the ++ operator in a++ b is treated as a postfix unary operator.

If an operator has no whitespace on the left but is followed immediately by a dot (.), it is treated as a postfix unary operator. As an example, the ++ operator in a++.b is treated as a postfix unary operator (a++ .b rather than a ++ .b).

etc... (read the docs for more on this)

As for the first part of your question, I didn't see any issue with either way of declaring the variables.

var j: Int = 34
var j:Int=23

The only issue with that provided code is that you declare j twice in the same scope. Try changing one of the j's to an x or y or something else.

If you were wondering about

var j:Int =10

or

var j:Int= 10

look at the rules above. = is an operator so if you were to do either of those, it would be treated as prefix or postfix, and you would get the error that prefix/postfix = is reserved

These rules are important due to the existence of operators such as the unary plus and unary minus operators. The compiler needs to be able to distinguish between a binary plus and a unary plus operator. List of operators

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