19

Given an array of two numbers, let them define the start and end of a range of numbers. For example, [2,6] means the range 2,3,4,5,6. I want to write javascript code to find the least common multiple for the range. My code below works for small ranges only, not something like [1,13] (which is the range 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13), which causes a stack overflow. How can I efficiently find the least common multiple of a range?

function leastCommonMultiple(arr) {
    var minn, max;
    if ( arr[0] > arr[1] ) {
        minn = arr[1];
        max = arr[0];
    } else {
        minn = arr[0];
        max = arr[1];
    }
    function repeatRecurse(min, max, scm) {
        if ( scm % min === 0 && min < max ) {
            return repeatRecurse(min+1, max, scm);
        } else if ( scm % min !== 0 && min < max ) {
            return repeatRecurse(minn, max, scm+max);
        }
        return scm;
    } 
    return repeatRecurse(minn, max, max);
}
  • use divide and conquer algorithm approach instead of recursion – vinayakj Jul 8 '15 at 19:49
  • i still have no idea about divide and conquer algorithm that u mentioned...is is Euclidean algorithm??? i have no time for Euclidean but if all else fail, i do Euclidean....i really hope someone can use higher order function and memoize(var cache = {}) to solve this but i dont think it possible – john chau Jul 8 '15 at 20:03
  • @vinayakj - divide and conquer algorithms utilize recursion :) – rgbchris Jul 8 '15 at 20:07
  • I didnt mean algorithm and I also dont have any idea about Euclidean algorithm, I was just referring to algorithmic approach/problem solution approach – vinayakj Jul 8 '15 at 20:07
  • @rgbchris but in divide and conquer recursion doesnt have to happen with whole data, you do it on subsets so you wont have stack overflow – vinayakj Jul 8 '15 at 20:15

19 Answers 19

36

I think this gets the job done.

function leastCommonMultiple(min, max) {
    function range(min, max) {
        var arr = [];
        for (var i = min; i <= max; i++) {
            arr.push(i);
        }
        return arr;
    }

    function gcd(a, b) {
        return !b ? a : gcd(b, a % b);
    }

    function lcm(a, b) {
        return (a * b) / gcd(a, b);   
    }

    var multiple = min;
    range(min, max).forEach(function(n) {
        multiple = lcm(multiple, n);
    });

    return multiple;
}

leastCommonMultiple(1, 13); // => 360360
  • thanks rgbchris, i think ur code is Euclidean lol. either way, thank alot for the solution. it is CORRECT! – john chau Jul 8 '15 at 20:07
  • i cannot modify ur code to accept [1,13]...can u do it like that instead of (min,max) – john chau Jul 8 '15 at 20:22
  • if someone is wondering what is going on, good and simple explanation can be found here: youtube.com/watch?v=6vWx5trbj6c, it explains relation between gcd and lcm, how to apply euclid`s algo and how it works.simple and easy to understand. – Gaurav Chauhan Jan 8 '17 at 12:06
5
function smallestCommons(arr) {
  var max = Math.max(...arr);
  var min = Math.min(...arr);
  var candidate = max;

  var smallestCommon = function(low, high) {
    // inner function to use 'high' variable
    function scm(l, h) {
      if (h % l === 0) {
        return h;
      } else {
        return scm(l, h + high);
      }
    }
    return scm(low, high);
  };

  for (var i = min; i <= max; i += 1) {
    candidate = smallestCommon(i, candidate);
  }

  return candidate;
}

smallestCommons([5, 1]); // should return 60
smallestCommons([1, 13]); // should return 360360
smallestCommons([23, 18]); //should return 6056820
3

LCM function for a range [a, b]

// Euclid algorithm for Greates Common Divisor
function gcd(a, b)
{ 
	return !b ? a : gcd(b, a % b);
} 

// Least Common Multiple function
function lcm(a, b) 
{
	return a * (b / gcd(a,b));
}

// LCM of all numbers in the range of arr=[a, b] 
function range_lcm(arr)
{
	// Swap [big, small] to [small, big]
	if(arr[0] > arr[1]) (arr = [arr[1], arr[0]]);

	for(x = result = arr[0]; x <= arr[1]; x++) {
		result = lcm(x, result);
	}
	
	return result; 
}

alert(range_lcm([8, 5])); // Returns 840

3

Mine is not as fancy as the other answers but I think it is easy to read.

function smallestCommons(arr) {
	//order our array so we know which number is smallest and which is largest
	var sortedArr = arr.sort(sortNumber),
	//the smallest common multiple that leaves no remainder when divided by all the numbers in the rang
	smallestCommon = 0,
	//smallest multiple will always be the largest number * 1;
	multiple = sortedArr[1];

	while(smallestCommon === 0) {
		//check all numbers in our range
		for(var i = sortedArr[0]; i <= sortedArr[1]; i++ ){
			if(multiple % i !== 0 ){
				//if we find even one value between our set that is not perfectly divisible, we can skip to the next multiple
				break;
			}

			//if we make it all the way to the last value (sortedArr[1]) then we know that this multiple was perfectly divisible into all values in the range
			if(i == sortedArr[1]){
				smallestCommon = multiple;
			}

		}

		//move to the next multiple, we can just add the highest number.
		multiple += sortedArr[1];
	}

	console.log(smallestCommon);
	return smallestCommon;
}

function sortNumber(a, b) {
    return a - b;
}


smallestCommons([1, 5]); // should return 60.
smallestCommons([5, 1]); // should return 60.
smallestCommons([1, 13]); // should return 360360.
smallestCommons([23, 18]); // should return 6056820.

Edit: Turned answer into snippet.

  • 1
    Liked this one, but the .sort() in the beginning would sort them alphabetically: [5,10] would be sorted to [10,5]. A minor glitch but worth fixing. – isacvale Jul 31 at 11:50
  • Good catch @isacvale ! I have updated the sort with a custom function to sort numerically instead. – Bullyen Aug 2 at 18:42
1

This is a non-recursive version of your original approach.

function smallestCommons(arr) {
  // Sort the array
  arr = arr.sort(function (a, b) {return a - b}); // numeric comparison;
  var min = arr[0];
  var max = arr[1];

  var numbers = [];
  var count = 0;

  //Here push the range of values into an array
  for (var i = min; i <= max; i++) {
    numbers.push(i);
  }
  //Here freeze a multiple candidate starting from the biggest array value - call it j
  for (var j = max; j <= 1000000; j+=max) {

    //I increase the denominator from min to max
    for (var k = arr[0]; k <= arr[1]; k++) {

      if (j % k === 0) { // every time the modulus is 0 increase a counting 
        count++; // variable
      }
    }

    //If the counting variable equals the lenght of the range, this candidate is the least common value
    if (count === numbers.length) { 
      return j; 
    }
    else{
      count = 0; // set count to 0 in order to test another candidate
    }
  }
}

alert(smallestCommons([1, 5]));

1

Hey I came across this page and wanted to share my solution :)

function smallestCommons(arr) {
  var max = Math.max(arr[0], arr[1]),
      min = Math.min(arr[0], arr[1]),
      i = 1;
  while (true) {
    var count = 0;
    for (j = min; j < max; j++) {
      if (max * i % j !== 0) {
        break;
      }
      count++;
    }
    if (count === (max - min)) {
      alert(max * i);
      return max * i;
    }
    i++;
  }
}
smallestCommons([23, 18]);

0
 function leastCommonMultiple(arr) {
    /*
      function range(min, max) {
        var arr = [];
       for (var i = min; i <= max; i++) {
        arr.push(i);
      }
       return arr;
    }
    */
    var min, range;
     range = arr;
    if(arr[0] > arr[1]){
       min = arr[1];
    }
    else{
       min = arr[0]
    }

    function gcd(a, b) {
        return !b ? a : gcd(b, a % b);
    }

    function lcm(a, b) {
        return (a * b) / gcd(a, b);   
    }

   var multiple = min;
    range.forEach(function(n) {
       multiple = lcm(multiple, n);
    });

   return multiple;
}

console.log( leastCommonMultiple([1, 13]) )

  • hang on, i see my mistake – john chau Jul 8 '15 at 20:26
  • i cannot even undderstand that Eucliden gcd algorithm – john chau Jul 8 '15 at 20:45
  • Did you copy the answer you accepted just to change the function's signature from two integers to an array of two integers? – Teepeemm Jul 9 '15 at 4:04
  • yes. i change 2 integers to determine min max from the array input – john chau Jul 10 '15 at 17:36
0

Well played on the solution. I think I got one that might be abit shorter just for future reference but ill definatly look into yours

function LCM(arrayRange) {
    var newArr = [];

    for (var j = arrayRange[0]; j <= arrayRange[1]; j++){
        newArr.push(j);
    }

    var a = Math.abs(newArr[0]);
    for (var i = 1; i < newArr.length; i++) {
        var b = Math.abs(newArr[i]),
            c = a;

        while (a && b) {
            a > b ? a %= b : b %= a;
        }
        a = Math.abs(c * newArr[i] / (a + b))
    }
   return console.log(a);
}

LCM([1,5]);
  • you should add : if (arrayRange[0] > arrayRange[1]) arrayRange.reverse() ; at the begining. – tnga Apr 4 '16 at 17:59
0

You may have originally had a stack overflow because of a typo: you switched between min and minn in the middle of repeatRecurse (you would have caught that if repeatRecurse hadn’t been defined in the outer function). With that fixed, repeatRecurse(1,13,13) returns 156.

The obvious answer to avoiding a stack overflow is to turn a recursive function into a non-recursive function. You can accomplish that by doing:

function repeatRecurse(min, max, scm) {
    while ( min < max ) {
        while ( scm % min !== 0 ) {
            scm += max;
        }
        min++;
    }
}

But perhaps you can see the mistake at this point: you’re not ensuring that scm is still divisible by the elements that came before min. For example, repeatRecurse(3,5,5)=repeatRecurse(4,5,15)=20. Instead of adding max, you want to replace scm with its least common multiple with min. You can use rgbchris’s gcd (for integers, !b is the same thing as b===0). If you want to keep the tail optimization (although I don’t think any javascript engine has tail optimization), you’d end up with:

function repeatRecurse(min, max, scm) {
    if ( min < max ) {
        return repeatRecurse(min+1, max, lcm(scm,min));
    }
    return scm;
} 

Or without the recursion:

function repeatRecurse(min,max,scm) {
    while ( min < max ) {
        scm = lcm(scm,min);
        min++;
    }
    return scm;
}

This is essentially equivalent to rgbchris’s solution. A more elegant method may be divide and conquer:

function repeatRecurse(min,max) {
    if ( min === max ) {
        return min;
    }
    var middle = Math.floor((min+max)/2);
    return lcm(repeatRecurse(min,middle),repeatRecurse(middle+1,max));
}

I would recommend moving away from the original argument being an array of two numbers. For one thing, it ends up causing you to talk about two different arrays: [min,max] and the range array. For another thing, it would be very easy to pass a longer array and never realize you’ve done something wrong. It’s also requiring several lines of code to determine the min and max, when those should have been determined by the caller.

Finally, if you’ll be working with truly large numbers, it may be better to find the least common multiple using the prime factorization of the numbers.

  • 1
    Hi Teepee, first thanks for trying so hard. but my code in the original post with 'minn' is not a mistake. Withouth 'minn', the answer is wrong. Yes, it wrong without 'minn'. Second function repeatRecurse(min, max, scm) { while ( min < max ) { while ( scm % min !== 0 ) { scm += max; } min++; } } doesnt work. I will try to modify it to work hopefully. I havent try ur other two snippets of codes. yet. so busy my friend. very busy, going headache here lol. peace – john chau Jul 12 '15 at 4:18
  • also for javascript tail optimization recursion, i dont know the whole detail or mechanism of how it work yet because I didnt read/study that part in Allonge Javascript. I will in the future soon. so much to learn – john chau Jul 12 '15 at 4:22
  • @johnnyjoe Oh. In that case, my edit broke your original code, which I shouldn't have done (sorry about that). My guess then as to why you had a stack overflow is that you only increment by max each time. Which means that your stack depth is finalAnswer/max. For [1,13], this is 360,360/13=27720 levels. – Teepeemm Jul 12 '15 at 5:00
0
function range(min, max) {
  var arr = [];
  for (var i = min; i <= max; i++) {
    arr.push(i);
  }
  return arr;
}

function gcd (x, y) {
  return (x % y === 0) ? y : gcd(y, x%y);
}

function lcm (x, y) {
  return (x * y) / gcd(x, y); 
}

function lcmForArr (min, max) {
  var arr = range(min, max);
  return arr.reduce(function(x, y) {
    return lcm(x, y); 
  });
}

range(10, 15); // [10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15]
gcd(10, 15); // 5
lcm(10, 15); // 30
lcmForArr(10, 15); //60060
0

How about:

// Euclid Algorithm for the Greatest Common Denominator
function gcd(a, b) {
    return !b ? a : gcd(b, a % b);
  }
  // Euclid Algorithm for the Least Common Multiple

function lcm(a, b) {
    return a * (b / gcd(a, b));
  }
  // LCM of all numbers in the range of arr = [a, b];

function smallestCommons(arr) {
  var i, result;
  // large to small - small to large
  if (arr[0] > arr[1]) {
    arr.reverse();
  } // only happens once. Means that the order of the arr reversed.
  for (i = result = arr[0]; i <= arr[1]; i++) { // all numbers up to arr[1] are arr[0].
    result = lcm(i, result); // lcm() makes arr int an integer because of the arithmetic operator.
  }
  return result;
}
smallestCommons([5, 1]); // returns 60

0
function lcm(arr) {
  var max = Math.max(arr[0],arr[1]),
      min = Math.min(arr[0],arr[1]),
      lcm = max;
  var calcLcm = function(a,b){
    var mult=1;
    for(var j=1; j<=a; j++){
      mult=b*j;
      if(mult%a === 0){
        return mult;
      }
    }
  };
  for(var i=max-1;i>=min;i--){
    lcm=calcLcm(i,lcm);
  }
  return lcm;
}
lcm([1,13]); //should return 360360.
0
    /*Function to calculate sequential numbers 
in the range between the arg values, both inclusive.*/
    function smallestCommons(arg1, arg2) {
     
       if(arg1>arg2) { // Swap arg1 and arg2 if arg1 is greater than arg2
          var temp = arg1;
          arg1 = arg2;
          arg2 =temp;
        }
      
      /*
      Helper function to calculate greatest common divisor (gcd)
      implementing Euclidean algorithm */
      function gcd(a, b) {
      	return b===0 ? a : gcd(b, a % b); 
       }
      
      /*
      Helper function to calculate lowest common multiple (lcm) 
of any two numbers using gcd function above */
       function lcm(a,b){
          return (a*b)/gcd(a,b);
         }
      
      var total = arg1; // copy min value
      for(var i=arg1;i<arg2;i++){
          total = lcm(total,i+1);
         }
      //return that total
      return total;
    }
    /*Yes, there are many solutions that can get the job done.
    Check this out, same approach but different view point.
    */
    console.log(smallestCommons(13,1)); //360360
0

Here's my solution. I hope you will find it easy to follow:

function smallestCommons(arr) {
  var min = Math.min(arr[0], arr[1]);
  var max = Math.max(arr[0], arr[1]);

  var smallestCommon = min * max;

  var doneCalc = 0;

  while (doneCalc === 0) {
    for (var i = min; i <= max; i++) {
      if (smallestCommon % i !== 0) {
        smallestCommon += max;
        doneCalc = 0;
        break;
      }
      else {
        doneCalc = 1;
      }
    }
  }

  return smallestCommon;
}
0

Here is another nonrecursive for-loop solution

function smallestCommons(arr) {
  var biggestNum = arr[0];
  var smallestNum = arr[1];
  var thirdNum;
  //make sure biggestNum is always the largest
  if (biggestNum < smallestNum) {
    thirdNum = biggestNum;
    biggestNum = smallestNum;
    smallestNum = thirdNum;
  }
  var arrNum = [];
  var count = 0;
  var y = biggestNum;

  // making array with all the numbers fom smallest to biggest
  for (var i = smallestNum; i <= biggestNum; i += 1) {
    arrNum.push(i);
  }

  for (var z = 0; z <= arrNum.length; z += 1) {
    //noprotect
    for (y; y < 10000000; y += 1) {
      if (y % arrNum[z] === 0) {
        count += 1;
        break;
      }
      else if (count === arrNum.length) {
        console.log(y);
        return y;
      }
      else {
        count = 0;
        z = 0;
      }
    }
  }
}
smallestCommons([23, 18]);
0
function smallestCommons(arr) {
  var sortedArr = arr.sort(); // sort array first
  var tempArr = []; // create an empty array to store the array range
  var a = sortedArr[0];
  var b = sortedArr[1];
  for(var i = a; i <= b; i++){
    tempArr.push(i);
  }
  // find the lcm of 2 nums using the Euclid's algorithm
  function gcd(a, b){
    while (b){
      var temp = b;
      b = a % b;
      a = temp;
    }
    return a;
  }

  function lcm(a, b){
    return Math.abs((a * b) / gcd(a, b));
  }
  var lcmRange = tempArr.reduce(lcm);


  return lcmRange;
}
0
function smallestCommons(arr) {
    let smallest, biggest, min;
    arr.reduce(function (a, b) {
        biggest = Math.max(a, b);
    });
    const max = biggest;
    arr.reduce(function (a, b) {
        smallest = Math.min(a, b);
        min = smallest;
    });
    check: while (true) {
        biggest += max;
        for (min = smallest; min < max; min++) {
            if (biggest % min != 0) {
                continue check;
            }
            if (min == (max - 1) && biggest % min == 0) {
                console.warn('found one');
                return biggest;
            }
        }
    }
}
0

    function smallestCommons(arr) {
      let min = Math.min(arr[0], arr[1]);
      let max = Math.max(arr[0], arr[1]);
      let scm = max;

      //calc lcm of two numbers:a,b;
      const calcLcm = function(a, b) {
        let minValue = Math.min(a, b);
        let maxValue = Math.max(a, b);
        let lcm = maxValue;
        while (lcm % minValue !== 0) {
          lcm += maxValue;
        }
        return lcm;
      }

      //calc scm in range of arr;
      for (let i = max; i >= min; i--) {
        scm = calcLcm(scm, i);
      }
      console.log(scm);
      return scm;
    }

    smallestCommons([1, 13]);

0

this is another very simple way and have low complexity.

function smallestCommons(arr) {
  let smallestNum = arr[0] < arr[1] ? arr[0] : arr[1];
  let greatestNum = arr[0] > arr[1] ? arr[0] : arr[1];
  let initalsArr = [];
  for(let i = smallestNum; i <= greatestNum; i++){
    initalsArr.push(i);
  }
  let notFoundFlag = true;
  let gNMltpl = 0;
  let filteredArrLen; 
  while(notFoundFlag){
    gNMltpl += greatestNum;
    filteredArrLen = initalsArr.filter((num)=>{
      return (gNMltpl / num) === Math.floor((gNMltpl / num)) 
    }).length;
    if(initalsArr.length == filteredArrLen){
      notFoundFlag = false;
    }
  }
  return gNMltpl;
}

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