40

I have a gradle task that executes a testng test suite. I want to be able to pass a flag to the task in order to use a special testng xml suite file (or just use the default suite if the flag isn't set).

gradle test

Should run the default standard suite of tests

gradle test -Pspecial

Should run the special suite of tests

I've been trying something like this:

test {
    if (special) {
        test(testng_special.xml);
    }
    else {
        test(testng_default.xml);
    }
}

But I get a undefined property error. What is the correct way to go about this?

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77
if (project.hasProperty('special'))

should do it.

Note that what you're doing to select a testng suite won't work, AFAIK: the test task doesn't have any test() method. Refer to https://discuss.gradle.org/t/how-to-run-acceptance-tests-with-testng-from-gradle/4107 for a working example:

test {
    useTestNG {
        suites 'src/main/resources/testng.xml'
    }
}
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  • @user2506293, that's not necessarily enough. You need to both check if project has a property and if it's set. – Opal Jul 10 '15 at 9:48
  • This is groovy @Opal - a null results in false, so you don't need to explicitly check that. – th3morg May 14 '16 at 0:58
  • @th3morg Thats wrong, if a property exists but is null, hasProperty(..) will still return true, so you have to use if (project.hasProperty('special') && project.special) if you want to check for both existance and not null. – Katharsas Jan 26 at 21:21
  • I like to use: project.properties["special"] == "true" – Venryx May 25 at 17:06
0

From Gradle Documentation:

-P, --project-prop

Sets a project property of the root project, for example -Pmyprop=myvalue

So you should use:

gradle test -Pspecial=true

with a value after the property name

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  • using JB Nizet's solution it's not necessary to set the property to true, just to define it – user2506293 Jul 8 '15 at 20:06
  • That's true, because you aren't reading the property value, but just checking if the property exist. Suppose that you were doing the opposite, so instead of Special you were using notSpecial and you needed a false value for this property in your condition. Using my solution you will not have problems because you will pass -PnotSpecial=false using JBNizet's solution instead the value passed was true anyway because the notSpecial property exist. – Alex Cortinovis Jul 8 '15 at 21:12
0

This worked for me:

test {
    if (properties.containsKey('special')) {
        test(testng_special.xml);
    }
    else {
        test(testng_default.xml);
    }
}
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