5

To send a char, we can use SendInput. How can I use it to send more than one char?

I tried this code but it does not send anything:

INPUT in;
in.type=INPUT_KEYBOARD;
in.ki.wScan=0;
in.ki.time=0;
in.ki.dwExtraInfo=0;
in.ki.wVk=0x53+0x54;

SendInput(2,&in,sizeof(INPUT));

So, what is the right way?

0
10

The first parameter of SendInput() specifies how many INPUT structures you are passing in. You are only passing in 1, but you are telling SendInput() that you are passing in 2.

You cannot specify two separate virtual keys in a single INPUT. You need to declare an array of multiple INPUTs, 2 INPUTs for each virtual key - one for the keydown event, and one for the keyup event. So, in your example, you actually need 4 INPUTs to send 2 virtual keys, as shown in @user4581301's answer.

Now, regarding KEYEVENTF_UNICODE, you don't use virtual keys with it, you use actual Unicode codepoints instead, where they are specified using UTF-16 codeunits, one per INPUT. So that means if you want to send a Unicode codepoint that requires a UTF-16 surrogate pair, you need 2 sets of down/up INPUTs, one set for the high surrogate, and one set for the low surrogate. That caveat is NOT mentioned in the SendInput() documentation, but it is implied by the fact that the vScan field is a 16bit WORD, and that KEYEVENTF_UNICODE events generate WM_CHAR messages, which passes UTF-16 surrogate codeunits as separate messages.

So, to send a string of Unicode characters using KEYEVENTF_UNICODE, you can do something like this:

#include <vector>
#include <string>

void SendInputString(const std::wstring &str)
{
    int len = str.length();
    if (len == 0) return;

    std::vector<INPUT> in(len*2);
    ZeroMemory(&in[0], in.size()*sizeof(INPUT));

    int i = 0, idx = 0;
    while (i < len)
    {
        WORD ch = (WORD) str[i++];

        if ((ch < 0xD800) || (ch > 0xDFFF))
        {
            in[idx].type = INPUT_KEYBOARD;
            in[idx].ki.wScan = ch;
            in[idx].ki.dwFlags = KEYEVENTF_UNICODE;
            ++idx;

            in[idx] = in[idx-1];
            in[idx].ki.dwFlags |= KEYEVENTF_KEYUP;
            ++idx;
        }
        else
        {
            in[idx].type = INPUT_KEYBOARD;
            in[idx].ki.wScan = ch;
            in[idx].ki.dwFlags = KEYEVENTF_UNICODE;
            ++idx;

            in[idx].type = INPUT_KEYBOARD;
            in[idx].ki.wScan = (WORD) str[i++];
            in[idx].ki.dwFlags = KEYEVENTF_UNICODE;
            ++idx;

            in[idx] = in[idx-2];
            in[idx].ki.dwFlags |= KEYEVENTF_KEYUP;
            ++idx;

            in[idx] = in[idx-2];
            in[idx].ki.dwFlags |= KEYEVENTF_KEYUP;
            ++idx;
        }
    }

    SendInput(in.size(), &in[0], sizeof(INPUT));
}
2
  • wstring is short for basic_string<wchar_t>. A wchar_t is the same size as an unsigned short (Windows, Visual Studio). An unsigned short cannot hold a value >= 0x10000. If it did, your code would exhibit UB, since it would write beyond the end of the container. I believe the call to ZeroMemory is also not required: The container will be populated with default-(zero-)initialized structures. Jul 9 '15 at 10:55
  • yes, you are right about wchar_t. I was looking at another piece of code that accepts codepoints instead of codeunits and forgot to adjust the if. I have corrected it. Jul 9 '15 at 14:55
4

If I've got you right, you want something more along the lines of this:

INPUT in[4] = {0}; // four inputs

// first input 0x53
in[0].type=INPUT_KEYBOARD;
in[0].ki.wScan=0;
in[0].ki.dwFlags=0;
in[0].ki.time=0;
in[0].ki.dwExtraInfo=0;
in[0].ki.wVk=0x53;

in[1] = in[0];
in[1].ki.dwFlags |= KEYEVENTF_KEYUP;

// second input 0x54
in[2].type=INPUT_KEYBOARD;
in[2].ki.wScan=0;
in[2].ki.dwFlags=0;
in[2].ki.time=0;
in[2].ki.dwExtraInfo=0;
in[2].ki.wVk=0x54;

in[3] = in[2];
in[3].ki.dwFlags |= KEYEVENTF_KEYUP;

SendInput(4,in,sizeof(INPUT));

Probably want to wrap the grunt work setting up the INPUT structure into a function to reduce duplication.

4
  • that dosnt work, even if it works, that would be so hard to send a variable string
    – Moe
    Jul 9 '15 at 0:19
  • @Kordy, it does work, when used correctly (this answer was partially correct - it was sending two inputs for keydown events, but was not sending two additional inputs for the corresponding keyup events - I have corrected that). As for variable-length strings, you would simply allocate the INPUT array dynamically at runtime based on how many characters are actually in the string, and then populate the array with each character. And when sending strings, you are better off using the KEYEVENTF_UNICODE flag to send actual UTF-16 characters instead of sending virtual key codes, Jul 9 '15 at 0:32
  • @RemyLebeau could you give me an example of using KEYEVENTF_UNICODE flag?
    – Moe
    Jul 9 '15 at 1:56
  • @Kordy: I posted an answer demonstrating KEYEVENTF_UNICODE. Jul 9 '15 at 3:08
1

Other answer didn't seem to work in a DirectX game. I tested the following in TrackMania Nations and it worked correctly: (notepad etc work as well)

#define _WIN32_WINNT 0x0500
#include <windows.h>
#include <string>

void press_some_keys (std::string str) {
    INPUT input[2 * (int)str.size()] = {0};

    int cnt = 0;
    for (char ch: str) {
        input[cnt].type = INPUT_KEYBOARD;
        input[cnt].ki.dwFlags = KEYEVENTF_SCANCODE;
        input[cnt].ki.wScan = MapVirtualKey(LOBYTE(VkKeyScan(ch)), 0);
        cnt++;

        input[cnt] = input[cnt - 1];
        cnt++;
    }

    SendInput(2 * (int)str.size(), input, sizeof(INPUT));
    Sleep(10);

    for (cnt = 1; cnt < 2 * (int)str.size(); cnt += 2)
        input[cnt].ki.dwFlags |= KEYEVENTF_KEYUP;

    SendInput(2 * (int)str.size(), input, sizeof(INPUT));
}

I only tested lowercase alphabet characters (no arrows or others), but it was enough for me.

It was a pain to get it working since the closest thing I found was a single tap function in a Youtube video :-)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.