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I'm trying to write an asynchronous consumer using asyncio/aioamqp. My problem is, the callback coroutine (below) is blocking. I set the channel to do a basic_consume(), and assign the callback as callback(). The callback has a "yield from asyncio.sleep" statement (to simulate "work"), which takes an integer from the publisher and sleeps for that amount of time before printing the message.

If I published two messages, one with a time of "10", immediately followed by one with a time of "1", I expected the second message would print first, since it has a shorter sleep time. Instead, the callback blocks for 10 seconds, prints the first message, and then prints the second.

It appears either basic_consume, or the callback, is blocking somewhere. Is there another way this could be handled?

@asyncio.coroutine
def callback(body, envelope, properties):
    yield from asyncio.sleep(int(body))
    print("consumer {} recved {} ({})".format(envelope.consumer_tag, body, envelope.delivery_tag))

@asyncio.coroutine
def receive_log():
    try:
        transport, protocol = yield from aioamqp.connect('localhost', 5672, login="login", password="password")
    except:
        print("closed connections")
        return

    channel = yield from protocol.channel()
    exchange_name = 'cloudstack-events'
    exchange_name = 'test-async-exchange'
    queue_name = 'async-queue-%s' % random.randint(0, 10000)
    yield from channel.exchange(exchange_name, 'topic', auto_delete=True, passive=False, durable=False)
    yield from asyncio.wait_for(channel.queue(queue_name, durable=False, auto_delete=True), timeout=10)

    binding_keys = ['mykey']

    for binding_key in binding_keys:
        print("binding", binding_key)
        yield from asyncio.wait_for(channel.queue_bind(exchange_name=exchange_name,
                                                       queue_name=queue_name,
                                                       routing_key=binding_key), timeout=10)

    print(' [*] Waiting for logs. To exit press CTRL+C')
    yield from channel.basic_consume(queue_name, callback=callback)

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
loop.create_task(receive_log())
loop.run_forever()
  • How many consumers do you have? – jonnybazookatone Jul 9 '15 at 18:27
  • Just one consumer. But I'm publishing multiple events with different timeouts, and it seems to block on asyncio.sleep(). I think the entire coroutine chain is paused when I do that, so I don't get the next event until the current one finishes. What I'm trying to do instead is schedule a loop.create_task() within the callback, which calls another coroutine to do the actual work (asyncio.sleep in this case). Maybe that will let the callback exit immediately so I can receive additional messages. Going to test it out and see if it works. – blindsnowmobile Jul 9 '15 at 18:42
5

For those interested, I figured out a way to do this. I'm not sure if it's best practice, but it's accomplishing what I need.

Rather than do the "work" (in this case, async.sleep) inside the callback, I create a new task on the loop, and schedule a separate co-routine to run do_work(). Presumably this is working, because it's freeing up callback() to return immediately.

I loaded up a few hundred events in Rabbit with different sleep timers, and they were interleaved when printed by the code below. So it seems to be working. Hope this helps someone!

@asyncio.coroutine
def do_work(envelope, body):
    yield from asyncio.sleep(int(body))
    print("consumer {} recved {} ({})".format(envelope.consumer_tag, body, envelope.delivery_tag))

@asyncio.coroutine
def callback(body, envelope, properties):
    loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
    loop.create_task(do_work(envelope, body))

@asyncio.coroutine
def receive_log():
    try:
        transport, protocol = yield from aioamqp.connect('localhost', 5672, login="login", password="password")
    except:
        print("closed connections")
        return

    channel = yield from protocol.channel()
    exchange_name = 'cloudstack-events'
    exchange_name = 'test-async-exchange'
    queue_name = 'async-queue-%s' % random.randint(0, 10000)
    yield from channel.exchange(exchange_name, 'topic', auto_delete=True, passive=False, durable=False)
    yield from asyncio.wait_for(channel.queue(queue_name, durable=False, auto_delete=True), timeout=10)

    binding_keys = ['mykey']

    for binding_key in binding_keys:
        print("binding", binding_key)
        yield from asyncio.wait_for(channel.queue_bind(exchange_name=exchange_name,
                                                       queue_name=queue_name,
                                                       routing_key=binding_key), timeout=10)

    print(' [*] Waiting for logs. To exit press CTRL+C')
    yield from channel.basic_consume(queue_name, callback=callback)

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
loop.create_task(receive_log())
loop.run_forever()
  • 1
    aioamqp probably calls yield from callback(*args) internally, so that the callbacks always run sequentially (since that might be desired behavior). The way you're handling getting concurrent callbacks (by scheduling the work inside your callback implementation instead of actually waiting for it to be done) is the right way to do it. – dano Jul 10 '15 at 18:24

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