2

I'd like to add a ProgressBar on a form with Marquee style, to show the user something is in progress. During the time consuming operation the form doesn't get updated, so the ProgressBar also "freezes".

I've checked several posts about BackgroundWorker, but in my case the operation doesn't report progress, that's why I need a Marquee bar.

Any help or code snippet is appreciated.

Note: I need to use .NET 4.0 (for XP support) so I can't use Task.Run :(

button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    progressBar1.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Marquee;
    progressBar1.MarqueeAnimationSpeed = 50;

    // INSERT TIME CONSUMING OPERATIONS HERE
    // THAT DON'T REPORT PROGRESS
    Thread.Sleep(10000);

    progressBar1.MarqueeAnimationSpeed = 0;
    progressBar1.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Blocks;
    progressBar1.Value = progressBar1.Minimum;

}
  • Do you know the count of iterations to be done at beginning of your consuming procedure? In this case, I may propose you some implementation. – Graffito Jul 10 '15 at 12:27
  • It isn't an iteration, more like waiting for MySQL connecting or LDAP response. – dobragab Jul 10 '15 at 12:50
8

I've checked several posts about BackgroundWorker, but in my case the operation doesn't report progress, that's why I need a Marquee bar.

You can use the BackgroundWorker, just don't use the "progress" portion of it. These two things are not mutually exclusive...

Example:

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        button1.Enabled = false;
        progressBar1.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Marquee;
        progressBar1.MarqueeAnimationSpeed = 50;

        BackgroundWorker bw = new BackgroundWorker();
        bw.DoWork += bw_DoWork;
        bw.RunWorkerCompleted += bw_RunWorkerCompleted;
        bw.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

    void bw_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        // INSERT TIME CONSUMING OPERATIONS HERE
        // THAT DON'T REPORT PROGRESS
        Thread.Sleep(10000);
    }

    void bw_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        progressBar1.MarqueeAnimationSpeed = 0;
        progressBar1.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Blocks;
        progressBar1.Value = progressBar1.Minimum;

        button1.Enabled = true;
        MessageBox.Show("Done!");
    }
  • Sounds good! Is it possible to access all the form controls from bw_RunWorkerCompleted? (So does it run on the same thread?) button1.Enabled = true; MessageBox.Show("Done!"); This suggests so. – dobragab Jul 10 '15 at 16:07
  • Yes, you can safely access all controls from the RunWorkerCompleted() event as it has already been marshaled to the main UI thread for you by the BackgroundWorker control. The same is true of the ProgressChanged() event if you use that in the future. – Idle_Mind Jul 10 '15 at 16:14
0

You still need to run your time consuming work on a different thread ... you are running it on the UI thread which means the UI doesn't have chance to do any UI updates (hence the freezing you witness)!

You should consider using Task<> instead of BackgroundWorker.

See https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh195051%28v=vs.110%29.aspx for more info on Task<>.


If you can't use Task<> then you should revert to BackgroundWorker and use the WorkCompleted event to stop the marquee and move your program onto its next operation.

  • Thanks, I'll take a look at it. Note that I can't use Task.Run, as I mentioned in the edit. Is there any alternative that is supported by .NET 4.0? – dobragab Jul 10 '15 at 12:25
0

Preferred solution

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    button1.Enabled = false;
    progressBar1.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Marquee;
    progressBar1.MarqueeAnimationSpeed = 50;

    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
           // INSERT TIME CONSUMING OPERATIONS HERE
           // THAT DON'T REPORT PROGRESS
           Thread.Sleep(10000);
        }, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning).
            ContinueWith(t => {
                progressBar1.MarqueeAnimationSpeed = 0;
                progressBar1.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Blocks;
                progressBar1.Value = progressBar1.Minimum;

                button1.Enabled = true;
                MessageBox.Show("Done!");
            }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
}

P.S. To handle the possible cancellation of the operation, the example instantiates a CancellationTokenSource object that generates a cancellation token.

-1

Solved. However, I think this is the least elegant way to handle it.

button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    progressBar1.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Marquee;
    progressBar1.MarqueeAnimationSpeed = 50;


    Task task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        // INSERT TIME CONSUMING OPERATIONS HERE
        // THAT DON'T REPORT PROGRESS
        Thread.Sleep(10000);
    });

    while (!task.IsCompleted)
    {
         Application.DoEvents();
         Thread.Sleep(1);
    }

    progressBar1.MarqueeAnimationSpeed = 0;
    progressBar1.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Blocks;
    progressBar1.Value = progressBar1.Minimum;

}
  • 2
    It's generally a really bad idea to hold your click handler in a polling loop like that. – Idle_Mind Jul 10 '15 at 15:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.