50

right here is a block of my code. It works perfect in fireFox and Chrome. But not in IE. I get the error "Object doesn't support property or method 'includes'"

function rightTreeSwapfunc2() {
    if ($(".right-tree").css("background-image").includes("stage1") == true) {
        $(".right-tree").css({
            backgroundImage: "url(/plant-breeding/img/scenes/plant-breeding/stage5.jpg)"
        })
    } else {
        $(".right-tree").css({
            backgroundImage: "url(/plant-breeding/img/scenes/plant-breeding/stage3.jpg)"
        })
    }
}

I could change it up a bit and use vanilla JS and do:

document.getElementById("right-tree").classList.contains

But I would rather see if there is a way to get it to work in IE before changing the JS and editing the HTML and CSS.

  • I find it odd that the great leveller, jQueery, fails to bring all browsers down to the lowest common denominator - if includes doesn't work in IE, it shouldn't work in any browser – Jaromanda X Jul 10 '15 at 12:36
  • includes() not stable function in cross browsers – Girish Jul 10 '15 at 12:38
  • includes is nothing to do with jQueery - the question is flawed :p – Jaromanda X Jul 10 '15 at 12:39
  • What version of jQuery are you using 1.x or 2.x? Also, I agree with Tushar - add the polyfill to your pages just incase other browsers do not support this feature. – jeff Jul 10 '15 at 12:46
  • 3
    The .includes() function has nothing to do with jQuery. .css() is a jQuery function and returns a string. .includes() is a function on the string object defined in ES6 which IE does not support. Your code is exactly the same as just doing "foo".includes("o"); without jQuery. – CodingWithSpike Jul 10 '15 at 12:55
96
0

If you look at the documentation of includes(), most of the browsers don't support this property.

You can use widely supported indexOf() after converting the property to string using toString():

if ($(".right-tree").css("background-image").indexOf("stage1") > -1) {
//                                           ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

You can also use the polyfill from MDN.

if (!String.prototype.includes) {
    String.prototype.includes = function() {
        'use strict';
        return String.prototype.indexOf.apply(this, arguments) !== -1;
    };
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Had to swap out my instances of .includes() for IE compatibility. I changed haystack.includes(needle) to haystack.indexOf(needle) !== -1 and it works on IE11. – KillahB Jul 19 '17 at 1:52
  • In case someone need it, you can use this directly with a string: if (SomeString.indexOf("SubString") > -1) { //Somecode } – César León Sep 26 '19 at 20:28
9
0

IE11 does implement String.prototype.includes so why not using the official Polyfill?

Source: polyfill source

  if (!String.prototype.includes) {
    String.prototype.includes = function(search, start) {
      if (typeof start !== 'number') {
        start = 0;
      }

      if (start + search.length > this.length) {
        return false;
      } else {
        return this.indexOf(search, start) !== -1;
      }
    };
  }
| improve this answer | |
  • For Angular 2+ users: use import 'core-js/es7/array' which has the correct polyfill, import 'core-js/es6/array' doesn't have 'includes' – Paul Trzyna May 26 at 14:41
1
0

In my case i found better to use "string.search".

var str = "Some very very very long string";
var n = str.search("very");

In case it would be helpful for someone.

| improve this answer | |
0
0

Here is solution ( ref : https://www.cluemediator.com/object-doesnt-support-property-or-method-includes-in-ie )

if (!Array.prototype.includes) {
  Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, 'includes', {
    value: function (searchElement, fromIndex) {

      if (this == null) {
        throw new TypeError('"this" is null or not defined');
      }

      // 1. Let O be ? ToObject(this value).
      var o = Object(this);

      // 2. Let len be ? ToLength(? Get(O, "length")).
      var len = o.length >>> 0;

      // 3. If len is 0, return false.
      if (len === 0) {
        return false;
      }

      // 4. Let n be ? ToInteger(fromIndex).
      //    (If fromIndex is undefined, this step produces the value 0.)
      var n = fromIndex | 0;

      // 5. If n ≥ 0, then
      //  a. Let k be n.
      // 6. Else n < 0,
      //  a. Let k be len + n.
      //  b. If k < 0, let k be 0.
      var k = Math.max(n >= 0 ? n : len - Math.abs(n), 0);

      function sameValueZero(x, y) {
        return x === y || (typeof x === 'number' && typeof y === 'number' && isNaN(x) && isNaN(y));
      }

      // 7. Repeat, while k < len
      while (k < len) {
        // a. Let elementK be the result of ? Get(O, ! ToString(k)).
        // b. If SameValueZero(searchElement, elementK) is true, return true.
        if (sameValueZero(o[k], searchElement)) {
          return true;
        }
        // c. Increase k by 1. 
        k++;
      }

      // 8. Return false
      return false;
    }
  });
}
| improve this answer | |
-4
0

One more solution is to use contains which will return true or false

_.contains($(".right-tree").css("background-image"), "stage1")

Hope this helps

| improve this answer | |
  • If I'm not wrong, this is a function provided by the underscorejs library.Unless he is already using this, it would be a waste to include an entire library just for this polyfill. – Ward D.S. Oct 4 '17 at 9:53

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