45

I want to split an array into pairs of arrays.

var arr = [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 4, 3, 5, 5]

would be

var newarr = [
    [2, 3],
    [4, 5],
    [6, 4],
    [3, 5],
    [5]
]
1

14 Answers 14

65

You can use js reduce

initialArray.reduce(function(result, value, index, array) {
  if (index % 2 === 0)
    result.push(array.slice(index, index + 2));
  return result;
}, []);
3
  • 1
    doesn't get shorter than that, best approach here! (and no extra libs)
    – chrismarx
    Aug 3, 2017 at 16:06
  • Make sure to notice that initialValue (the "[]"), that's easy to forget - developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…
    – chrismarx
    Aug 3, 2017 at 16:07
  • or you can go with a spread operator, almost a one liner :D array.reduce((result, value, index, sourceArray) => index % 2 === 0 ? [...result, sourceArray.slice(index, index + 2)] : result, [])
    – mkbctrl
    Mar 21, 2021 at 8:20
19

Lodash has a method for this: https://lodash.com/docs/4.17.10#chunk

_.chunk([2,3,4,5,6,4,3,5,5], 2); // => [[2,3],[4,5],[6,4],[3,5],[5]]

15

There's no pre-baked function to do that, but here's a simple solution:

var splitPairs = function(arr) {
    var pairs = [];
    for (var i=0 ; i<arr.length ; i+=2) {
        if (arr[i+1] !== undefined) {
            pairs.push ([arr[i], arr[i+1]]);
        } else {
            pairs.push ([arr[i]]);
        }
    }
    return pairs;
};
4
  • What about the odd length for arr that the OP shows?
    – jfriend00
    Jul 11, 2015 at 0:50
  • Good catch, I modified my code for that case. Thank you
    – ChadF
    Jul 11, 2015 at 1:13
  • Looks like you're missing a closing bracket in your first push statement
    – vol7ron
    Jul 11, 2015 at 1:34
  • Just in case someone ends up here for this: I was running into infinite loops because I did for(var i = 0; i < arr.length; i + 2). The index was not updating because i + 2 doesn't set the i value. i += 2 works because it sets the i value. This is why going functional with map/reduce is way better whenever possible! Jan 22, 2018 at 4:16
13

Yet another that's a bit of a mish-mash of the already-posted answers. Adding it because having read the answers I still felt things could be a little easier to read:

var groups = [];

for(var i = 0; i < arr.length; i += 2)
{
    groups.push(arr.slice(i, i + 2));
}
4
  • 1
    Nice work, I find this one the easiest to understand.
    – Bemmu
    Aug 22, 2017 at 11:59
  • Great solution. Docs: slice: If end is greater than the length of the sequence, slice extracts through to the end of the sequence (arr.length).
    – Gamma032
    Dec 14, 2019 at 15:20
  • Thank you for sharing your solution! Apr 3, 2020 at 23:12
  • 1
    3 years later and your helping someone else out!
    – JaySnel
    Oct 29, 2020 at 18:08
4

I would use lodash for situations like this.

Here is a solution using _.reduce:

var newArr = _(arr).reduce(function(result, value, index) {
  if (index % 2 === 0)
    result.push(arr.slice(index, index + 2));

  return result;
}, []);

var arr = [2,3,4,5,6,4,3,5,5];

var newArr = _(arr).reduce(function(result, value, index) {
  if (index % 2 === 0)
    result.push(arr.slice(index, index + 2));
  
  return result;
}, []);

document.write(JSON.stringify(newArr)); // [[2,3],[4,5],[6,4],[3,5],[5]]
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/3.10.0/lodash.min.js"></script>

3
4

It's possible to group an array into pairs/chunks in one line without libraries:

function chunks(arr, size = 2) {
  return arr.map((x, i) => i % size == 0 && arr.slice(i, i + size)).filter(x => x)
}
console.log(chunks([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7])) // -> [[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6], [7]]

4

There is now the flexible Array#flatMap(value, index, array):

const pairs = arr.flatMap((_, i, a) => i % 2 ? [] : [a.slice(i, i + 2)]);

And the possibly more efficient, but goofy looking Array.from(source, mapfn?):

const pairs = Array.from({ length: arr.length / 2 }, (_, i) => arr.slice(i * 2, i * 2 + 2))
3

A slightly different approach than using a for loop for comparison. To avoid modifying the original array slice makes a shallow copy since JS passes objects by reference.

function pairArray(a) {
  var temp = a.slice();
  var arr = [];

  while (temp.length) {
    arr.push(temp.splice(0,2));
  }

  return arr;
}

var array = [2,3,4,5,6,4,3,5,5];
var newArr = pairArray(array);

function pairArray(a) {
  var temp = a.slice();
  var arr = [];

  while (temp.length) {
    arr.push(temp.splice(0,2));
  }

  return arr;
}

document.write('<pre>' + JSON.stringify(newArr) + '</pre>');

2
  • Haha, I see you preferred not using formatting like me ;) Jul 11, 2015 at 1:48
  • @PatrickRobert Yes, in this case I realized it was making it harder to read. Similar minds I suppose. :)
    – Jason Cust
    Jul 13, 2015 at 15:09
2

Here's a good generic solution:

function splitInto(array, size, inplace) {
    var output, i, group;

    if (inplace) {
        output = array;

        for (i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
            group = array.splice(i, size);

            output.splice(i, 0, group);
        }
    } else {
        output = [];

        for (i = 0; i < array.length; i += size) {
            output.push(array.slice(i, size + i));
        }
    }

    return output;
}

For your case, you can call it like this:

var arr= [2,3,4,5,6,4,3,5,5];
var newarr = splitInto(arr, 2);

The inplace argument determines whether the operation is done in-place or not.

Here's a demo below:

function splitInto(array, size, inplace) {
    var output, i, group;

    if (inplace) {
        output = array;

        for (i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
            group = array.splice(i, size);

            output.splice(i, 0, group);
        }
    } else {
        output = [];

        for (i = 0; i < array.length; i += size) {
            output.push(array.slice(i, size + i));
        }
    }

    return output;
}

var arr= [2,3,4,5,6,4,3,5,5];
var newarr = splitInto(arr, 2);

disp(newarr);

// or we can do it in-place...
splitInto(arr, 3, true);

disp(arr);

function disp(array) {  
  var json = JSON.stringify(array);

  var text = document.createTextNode(json);
  var pre = document.createElement('pre');

  pre.appendChild(text);
  document.body.appendChild(pre);
}

2

Here's another solution using lodash helpers:

function toPairs(array) {
  const evens = array.filter((o, i) => i % 2);
  const odds = array.filter((o, i) => !(i % 2));
  return _.zipWith(evens, odds, (e, o) => e ? [o, e] : [o]);
}
console.log(toPairs([2,3,4,5,6,4,3,5,5]));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.13.1/lodash.min.js"></script>

1
1

const items = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

const createBucket = (bucketItems, bucketSize) => buckets => {
  return bucketItems.length === 0 ? buckets : [...buckets, bucketItems.splice(0, bucketSize)];
};

const bucketWithItems = items.reduce(createBucket([...items], 4), []);

0

Here is a short and more generic solution:

function splitArrayIntoPairs(arr, n) {
 var len = arr.length
  var pairs = []

  for (let i = 0; i < len; i += n) {
    var temp = []
    for (var j = i; j < (i + n); j++) {
      if (arr[j] !== undefined) {
        temp.push(arr[j])
      }
    }
    pairs.push(temp)
  }
  return pairs
}

Where arr is your array and n is no of pairs

0

Here is another generic solution that uses a generator function.

/**
 * Returns a `Generator` of all unique pairs of elements from the given `iterable`.
 * @param iterable The collection of which to find all unique element pairs.
 */
function* pairs(iterable) {
    const seenItems = new Set();
    for (const currentItem of iterable) {
        if (!seenItems.has(currentItem)) {
            for (const seenItem of seenItems) {
                yield [seenItem, currentItem];
            }
            seenItems.add(currentItem);
        }
    }
}

const numbers = [1, 2, 3, 2];
const pairsOfNumbers = pairs(numbers);

console.log(Array.from(pairsOfNumbers));
// [[1,2],[1,3],[2,3]]

What I like about this approach is that it will not consume the next item from the input until it actually needs it. This is especially handy if you feed it a generator as input, since it will respect its lazy execution.

0

This combines some of the answers above but without Object.fromEntires. The output is similar to what you would get with minimist.

    const splitParameters = (args) => {
      const split = (arg) => (arg.includes("=") ? arg.split("=") : [arg]);
    
      return args.reduce((params, arg) => [...params, ...split(arg)], []);
    };
    
    const createPairs = (args) =>
      Array.from({ length: args.length / 2 }, (_, i) =>
        args.slice(i * 2, i * 2 + 2)
      );
    
    const createParameters = (pairs) =>
      pairs.reduce(
        (flags, value) => ({
          ...flags,
          ...{ [value[0].replace("--", "")]: value[1] }
        }),
        {}
      );
    
    const getCliParameters = (args) => {
      const pairs = createPairs(splitParameters(args));
      const paramaters = createParameters(pairs);
    
      console.log(paramaters);
    
      return paramaters;
    };
 

    //const argsFromNodeCli = process.argv.slice(2); // For node
      
    const testArgs = [
      "--url",
      "https://www.google.com",
      "--phrases=hello,hi,bye,ok"
    ];
    
    const output = getCliParameters(testArgs);
    document.body.innerText = JSON.stringify(output);

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