I'm new to using ES6 classes with React, previously I've been binding my methods to the current object (show in first example), but does ES6 allow me to permanently bind a class function to a class instance with arrows? (Useful when passing as a callback function.) I get errors when I try to use them as you can with CoffeeScript:

class SomeClass extends React.Component {

  // Instead of this
  constructor(){
    this.handleInputChange = this.handleInputChange.bind(this)
  }

  // Can I somehow do this? Am i just getting the syntax wrong?
  handleInputChange (val) => {
    console.log('selectionMade: ', val);
  }

So that if I were to pass SomeClass.handleInputChange to, for instance setTimeout, it would be scoped to the class instance, and not the window object.

  • 1
    I would be interested in knowing the same answer for TypeScript – Mars Robertson Jun 23 '16 at 14:09
  • TypeScript's solution is the same as the ES7 proposal (see accepted answer). This is supported natively by TypeScript. – Philip Bulley Jul 28 '16 at 14:43
up vote 176 down vote accepted

Your syntax is slightly off, just missing an equals sign after the property name.

class SomeClass extends React.Component {
  handleInputChange = (val) => {
    console.log('selectionMade: ', val);
  }
}

This is an experimental feature. You will need to enable experimental features in Babel to get this to compile. Here is a demo with experimental enabled.

To use experimental features in babel you can install the relevant plugin from here. For this specific feature, you need the transform-class-properties plugin:

{
  "plugins": [
    "transform-class-properties"
  ]
}

You can read more about the proposal for Class Fields and Static Properties here


  • 4
    (Though I know that works outside of an ES6 class) that doesn't appear to work for me, babel throws an unexpected token arrow at the first = at handleInputChange = – Ben Jul 11 '15 at 22:16
  • 34
    You should provide some explanation, e.g. that this is an experimental feature for a ES7 proposal. – Felix Kling Jul 11 '15 at 22:23
  • 1
    current specification draft was changed in September, so you shouldn't use it for autobind as Babel proposes. – chico Oct 24 '15 at 19:34
  • 1
    For Babel 6.3.13 you need presets 'es2015' and 'stage-1' activated to compile this – Andrew Dec 21 '15 at 23:58
  • 10
    It works, but the method is added to the instance in the constructor instead of being added to the prototype and its a big difference. – lib3d Jan 21 '16 at 17:17

No, if you want to create bound, instance-specific methods you will have to do that in the constructor. However, you can use arrow functions for that, instead of using .bind on a prototype method:

class SomeClass extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.handleInputChange = (val) => {
      console.log('selectionMade: ', val, this);
    };
    …
  }
}

There is an proposal which might allow you to omit the constructor() and directly put the assignment in the class scope with the same functionality, but I wouldn't recommend to use that as it's highly experimental.

Alternatively, you can always use .bind, which allows you to declare the method on the prototype and then bind it to the instance in the constructor. This approach has greater flexibility as it allows modifying the method from the outside of your class.

class SomeClass extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.handleInputChange = this.handleInputChange.bind(this);
    …
  }
  handleInputChange(val) {
    console.log('selectionMade: ', val, this);
  }
}
  • 1
    Can anyone speak to performance implications of doing it this way vs binding on a prototype? – Tyler Collier Aug 5 '16 at 17:45
  • @TylerCollier: there should not be much difference. If you need absolute speed, neither of the two is a good option actually. But afaik bind is marginally slower than closures because it needs to do additional housekeeping. Anyway arrow functions are more idiomatic since ES6, which should be enough reason to use them. – Bergi Aug 5 '16 at 21:36
  • 1
    Ok, thanks re: speed and I get what you meaning about idiomatic being reason enough. However: "Arrow function are more idiomatic", sure, but I wouldn't say adding all (arrow) functions in the constructor is yet idiomatic, and I hope it never is. – Tyler Collier Aug 5 '16 at 21:49

I know this question has been sufficiently answered, but I just have a small contribution to make (for those who don't want to use the experimental feature). Because of the problem of having to bind multiple function binds in the constructor and making it look messy, I came up with a utility method that once bound and called in the constructor, does all the necessary method bindings for you automatically.

Assume I have this class with the constructor:

//src/components/PetEditor.jsx
import React from 'react';
class PetEditor extends React.Component {
  
   constructor(props){
        super(props);
        this.state = props.currentPet || {tags:[], photoUrls: []};
     
        this.tagInput = null;
        this.htmlNode = null;

        this.removeTag = this.removeTag.bind(this);
        this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this);
        this.modifyState = this.modifyState.bind(this);
        this.handleKeyUp = this.handleKeyUp.bind(this);
        this.addTag = this.addTag.bind(this);
        this.removeTag = this.removeTag.bind(this);
        this.savePet = this.savePet.bind(this);
        this.addPhotoInput = this.addPhotoInput.bind(this);
        this.handleSelect = this.handleSelect.bind(this);
        
    }
  
    ...//actual method declarations omitted
  
}

It looks messy, doesn't it? Now I created this utility method

//src/utils/index.js
/**
 *  NB: to use this method, you need to bind it to the object instance calling it
 */
export function bindMethodsToSelf(objClass, otherMethodsToIgnore=[]){
    const self = this;
    Object.getOwnPropertyNames(objClass.prototype)
        .forEach(method => {
              //skip constructor, render and any overrides of lifecycle methods
              if(method.startsWith('component') 
                 || method==='constructor' 
                 || method==='render') return;
              //any other methods you don't want bound to self
              if(otherMethodsToIgnore.indexOf(method)>-1) return;
              //bind all other methods to class instance
              self[method] = self[method].bind(self);
         });
}

All I now need to do is import that utility, and add a call to my constructor, and I don't need to bind each new method in the constructor anymore. New constructor now looks clean, like this:

//src/components/PetEditor.jsx
import React from 'react';
import { bindMethodsToSelf } from '../utils';
class PetEditor extends React.Component {
    constructor(props){
        super(props);
        this.state = props.currentPet || {tags:[], photoUrls: []};
        this.tagInput = null;
        this.htmlNode = null;
        bindMethodsToSelf.bind(this)(PetEditor);
    }
    ...
}

  • Your solution is nice, however it doesn't cover all the life cycle methods unless you declare them in the second argument. For example: shouldComponentUpdate and getSnapshotBeforeUpdate – WebDeg Brian Sep 3 at 14:35

You are using arrow function and also binding it in constructor. So you no need to do binding when you use arrow functions

class SomeClass extends React.Component {
  handleInputChange = (val) => {
    console.log('selectionMade: ', val);
  }
}

OR you need to bind a function only in constructor when you use normal function like below

class SomeClass extends React.Component {
   constructor(props){
      super(props);
      this.handleInputChange = this.handleInputChange.bind(this);
   }

  handleInputChange(val){
    console.log('selectionMade: ', val);
  }
}

Also binding a function directly in render is not recommended. It should always be in constructor

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