198

In Java an array can be initialized such as:

int numbers[] = new int[] {10, 20, 30, 40, 50}

How does Kotlin's array initialization look like?

  • Maybe just have a look at the docs: kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/basic-types.html – khlr Jul 12 '15 at 9:27
  • 4
    The documentation somewhat hides the answer. Instead of giving a source code example they mention the (deprecated) array() function in a side comment: To create an array, we can use a library function array() and pass the item values to it, so that array(1, 2, 3) creates an array [1, 2, 3]. – Lars Blumberg Jul 12 '15 at 9:37
  • 5
    Although I like Kotlin but I have say "Kotlin documentation" is not good enough (I learned more from other sites than kotlinlang.org). – Hassan Tareq Oct 5 '17 at 6:46

16 Answers 16

225
val numbers: IntArray = intArrayOf(10, 20, 30, 40, 50)

See Kotlin - Basic Types for details.

  • 5
    Thanks. Latest Kotlin suggests to use intArrayOf instead. – Lars Blumberg Jul 12 '15 at 9:30
  • 4
    Is it preferable to use intArrayOf over arrayOf? Thus does IntArray have advantages over Array<Int>? – Lars Blumberg Jul 12 '15 at 9:31
  • 11
    @LarsBlumberg IntArray is equals to int[], Array<Int> is the same as Integer[] – user2235698 Jul 12 '15 at 18:34
  • 1
    Your example doesn't work in try.kotlinlang.org/, intArrayOf does. New language - many changes. – Paul Jurczak Nov 5 '15 at 6:48
  • 3
    Initializing a list is very similar: listOf(10, 20, 30, 40, 50) – Cristan Dec 24 '16 at 12:01
62

Worth mentioning that when using kotlin builtines (e.g. intArrayOf(), longArrayOf(), arrayOf(), etc) you are not able to initialize the array with default values (or all values to desired value) for a given size, instead you need to do initialize via calling according to class constructor.

// Array of integers of a size of N
val arr = IntArray(N)

// Array of integers of a size of N initialized with a default value of 2
val arr = IntArray(N) { i -> 2 }
  • 4
    That second default value init using the lambda was super helpful! Thanks – rf43 Jan 23 '17 at 2:58
  • 5
    The second form of initialization can be written as: IntArray(N) {i -> 2} and even (when initializing with a constant) IntArray(N) {2} – David Soroko Jul 1 '18 at 21:11
41

Here's an example:

fun main(args: Array<String>) {
    val arr = arrayOf(1, 2, 3);
    for (item in arr) {
        println(item);
    }
}

You can also use a playground to test language features.

  • 2
    One comment, to print value of an array, we can use array.joinToString(" ") instead looping. – anticafe Apr 4 '18 at 8:45
  • 2
    Works but looks more Java written in Kotlin than idiomatic Kotlin :) – m0skit0 Nov 30 '18 at 17:41
35

In Kotlin There are Several Ways.

var arr = IntArray(size) // construct with only size

Then simply initial value from users or from another collection or wherever you want.

var arr = IntArray(size, { 0 } ) // construct with size and fill array with 0
var arr = IntArray(size, { it * 1 } ) // construct with size and fill with its index

We also can create array with built in function like-

var arr = intArrayOf(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) // create an array with 5 values

Another way

var arr = Array(size, { 0 } ) // it will create an integer array
var arr = Array<String>(size, { "$it" } ) // this will create array with "0", "1", "2" and so on.

You also can use doubleArrayOf() or DoubleArray() or any primitive type instead of Int.

19

In Kotlin we can create array using arrayOf(), intArrayOf(), charArrayOf(), booleanArrayOf(), longArrayOf() functions.

For example:

var Arr1 = arrayOf(1,10,4,6,15)  
var Arr2 = arrayOf<Int>(1,10,4,6,15)  
var Arr3 = arrayOf<String>("Surat","Mumbai","Rajkot")  
var Arr4 = arrayOf(1,10,4, "Ajay","Prakesh")  
var Arr5: IntArray = intArrayOf(5,10,15,20)  
  • Please reformat this Answer so it is clear what is code and what is comment. – user1531971 Jul 9 '18 at 17:04
6

Old question, but if you'd like to use a range:

var numbers: IntArray = IntRange(10, 50).step(10).toList().toIntArray()

Yields nearly the same result as:

var numbers = Array(5, { i -> i*10 + 10 })

result: 10, 20, 30, 40, 50

I think the first option is a little more readable. Both work.

  • "first option is a little more readable" - debatable :) – Antek Aug 14 '17 at 16:40
5

you can use this methods

var numbers=Array<Int>(size,init)
var numbers=IntArray(size,init)
var numbers= intArrayOf(1,2,3)

example

var numbers = Array<Int>(5, { i -> 0 })

init represents the default value ( initialize )

  • 1
    It helps if you give examples for init in Array<Int>() and IntArray(), your answer isn't much helpful as of now. – Lars Blumberg Jun 1 '17 at 11:30
  • The answer has been modified – Ali hasan Jun 2 '17 at 19:13
3

I think one thing that is worth mentioning and isn't intuitive enough from the documentation is that, when you use a factory function to create an array and you specify it's size, the array is initialized with values that are equal to their index values. For example, in an array such as this: val array = Array(5, { i -> i }), the initial values assigned are [0,1,2,3,4] and not say, [0,0,0,0,0]. That is why from the documentation, val asc = Array(5, { i -> (i * i).toString() }) produces an answer of ["0", "1", "4", "9", "16"]

3

You can create an Int Array like this:

val numbers = IntArray(5, { 10 * (it + 1) })

5 is the Int Array size. the lambda function is the element init function. 'it' range in [0,4], plus 1 make range in [1,5]

origin function is:

 /**
 * An array of ints. When targeting the JVM, instances of this class are 
 * represented as `int[]`.
 * @constructor Creates a new array of the specified [size], with all elements 
 *  initialized to zero.
 */
 public class IntArray(size: Int) {
       /**
        * Creates a new array of the specified [size], where each element is 
        * calculated by calling the specified
        * [init] function. The [init] function returns an array element given 
        * its index.
        */
      public inline constructor(size: Int, init: (Int) -> Int)
  ...
 }

IntArray class defined in the Arrays.kt

3

Kotlin language has specialised classes for representing arrays of primitive types without boxing overhead: for instance – IntArray, ShortArray, ByteArray, etc. I need to say that these classes have no inheritance relation to the parent Array class, but they have the same set of methods and properties. Each of them also has a corresponding factory function. So, to initialise an array with values in Kotlin you just need to type this:

val myArr: IntArray = intArrayOf(10, 20, 30, 40, 50)

...or this way:

val myArr = Array<Int>(5, { i -> ((i+1) * 10) })

myArr.forEach { println(it) }                                // 10, 20, 30, 40, 50

Now you can use it:

myArr[0] = (myArr[1] + myArr[2]) - myArr[3]

Hope this helps.

2

You can try this:

var a = Array<Int>(5){0}
2

You can simply use the existing standard library methods as shown here:

val numbers = intArrayOf(10, 20, 30, 40, 50)

It might make sense to use a special constructor though:

val numbers2 = IntArray(5) { (it + 1) * 10 }

You pass a size and a lambda that describes how to init the values. Here's the documentation:

/**
 * Creates a new array of the specified [size], where each element is calculated by calling the specified
 * [init] function. The [init] function returns an array element given its index.
 */
public inline constructor(size: Int, init: (Int) -> Int)
1

In my case I need to initialise my drawer items. I fill data by below code.

    val iconsArr : IntArray = resources.getIntArray(R.array.navigation_drawer_items_icon)
    val names : Array<String> = resources.getStringArray(R.array.navigation_drawer_items_name)


    // Use lambda function to add data in my custom model class i.e. DrawerItem
    val drawerItems = Array<DrawerItem>(iconsArr.size, init = 
                         { index -> DrawerItem(iconsArr[index], names[index])})
    Log.d(LOGGER_TAG, "Number of items in drawer is: "+ drawerItems.size)

Custom Model class-

class DrawerItem(var icon: Int, var name: String) {

}
  • This doesn't really answer the question in a sensible way. – Qwerp-Derp Sep 6 '17 at 7:29
  • Please check comment in which I used lambda function to add items. – Rahul Sep 7 '17 at 7:23
  • This still seems like a convoluted way to solve this problem, at least compared to the other answers. Also I looked at my previous message, and it seems harsh in retrospect - I'm sorry. – Qwerp-Derp Sep 7 '17 at 7:26
  • That is fine, no issue. I just tried to answer in a way which resolved my issue, I didn't compared with other answers. Thank you! – Rahul Sep 7 '17 at 7:28
1

Declare int array at global

var numbers= intArrayOf()

next onCreate method initialize your array with value

override fun onCreate(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState)
    setContentView(R.layout.activity_main)
    //create your int array here
    numbers= intArrayOf(10,20,30,40,50)
}
  • While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value. – rollstuhlfahrer Mar 14 '18 at 8:09
1

I'm wondering why nobody just gave the most simple of answers:

val array: Array<Int> = [1, 2, 3]

As per one of the comments to my original answer, I realized this only works when used in annotations arguments (which was really unexpected for me).

Looks like Kotlin doesn't allow to create array literals outside annotations.

For instance, look at this code using @Option from args4j library:


    @Option(
        name = "-h",
        aliases = ["--help", "-?"],
        usage = "Show this help"
    )
    var help: Boolean = false

The option argument "aliases" is of type Array<String>

  • 2
    I have got the following error with this code : Unsupported [Collection literals outside of annotations] – Rémi P Apr 26 at 13:59
  • I haven't seen this before. Is this syntax new to Kotlin? – Lars Blumberg Apr 27 at 13:53
  • @LarsBlumberg, probably, I just started to use Kotlin recently with IntelliJ 2019.1 and I initialized a string array just like I showed and it worked – hdkrus Apr 29 at 2:41
  • @RémiP, Good point, I used it on annotations arguments. But that would mean that array literals works in some contexts and in some other don't? – hdkrus Apr 29 at 2:44
  • 1
    @hdkrus Why don't you update your answer to show how array initialization works with annotations? This can be of value for many readers of this questions. – Lars Blumberg Apr 29 at 10:21
0

intialize array in this way : val paramValueList : Array<String?> = arrayOfNulls<String>(5)

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