39

I have about 200 grayscale PNG images stored within a directory like this.

1.png
2.png
3.png
...
...
200.png

I want to import all the PNG images as NumPy arrays. How can I do this?

28

Using just scipy, glob and having PIL installed (pip install pillow) you can use scipy's imread method:

from scipy import misc
import glob

for image_path in glob.glob("/home/adam/*.png"):
    image = misc.imread(image_path)
    print image.shape
    print image.dtype

UPDATE

According to the doc, scipy.misc.imread is deprecated starting SciPy 1.0.0, and will be removed in 1.2.0. Consider using imageio.imread instead. See the answer by Charles.

  • Just change to glob.glob("./train/*.png") – pbu Jul 13 '15 at 14:53
  • 2
    scipy.misc.imread is deprecated. See my answer below! – Charles Oct 31 '17 at 20:48
54

Bit late to the party, but the current answer is now deprecated.

According to the doc, scipy.misc.imread is deprecated starting SciPy 1.0.0, and will be removed in 1.2.0. Consider using imageio.imread instead.

Example:

import imageio

im = imageio.imread('my_image.png')
print(im.shape)

You can also use imageio to load from fancy sources:

im = imageio.imread('http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/de/Wikipedia_Logo_1.0.png')

Edit:

To load all of the *.png files in a specific folder, you could use the glob package:

import imageio
import glob

for im_path in glob.glob("path/to/folder/*.png"):
     im = imageio.imread(im_path)
     print(im.shape)
     # do whatever with the image here
  • 2
    Downvoter, if you could please help me make this answer better by telling me what to improve, it would be very appreciated! – Charles May 22 '18 at 21:55
  • I'm not downvoter but the question is to load a list of images in a folder. Can you modify your answer to reflect that, not just 1 - 200.png but what if the png have random names, that would help me a lot. I'm sure I can use os to ls and get the file names but is there a better way? Perhaps you should edit to add glob – devssh Sep 18 '18 at 14:23
  • 1
    Please see my last edit, @devssh – Charles Sep 18 '18 at 14:31
  • Also, remember to add a try catch as imread may throw ValueError. I don't have privileges to edit or I would have updated it for you. :) – devssh Sep 18 '18 at 14:37
  • The developer should choose if, in this context, the exception should be raised and halt execution or handled in a specific way. Without context, raising is preferred. – Charles Sep 18 '18 at 14:42
6

This can also be done with the Image class of the PIL library:

from PIL import Image
import numpy as np

im_frame = Image.open(path_to_file + 'file.png')
np_frame = np.array(im_frame.getdata())
3

If you are loading images, you are likely going to be working with one or both of matplotlib and opencv to manipulate and view the images.

For this reason, I tend to use their image readers and append those to lists, from which I make a NumPy array.

import os
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import cv2
import numpy as np

# Get the file paths
im_files = os.listdir('path/to/files/')

# imagine we only want to load PNG files (or JPEG or whatever...)
EXTENSION = '.png'

# Load using matplotlib
images_plt = [plt.imread(f) for f in im_files if f.endswith(EXTENSION)]
# convert your lists into a numpy array of size (N, H, W, C)
images = np.array(images_plt)

# Load using opencv
images_cv = [cv2.imread(f) for f in im_files if f.endswith(EXTENSION)]
# convert your lists into a numpy array of size (N, C, H, W)
images = np.array(images_cv)

The only difference to be aware of is the following:

  • opencv loads channels first
  • matplotlib loads channels last.

So a single image that is 256*256 in size would produce matrices of size (3, 256, 256) with opencv and (256, 256, 3) using matplotlib.

2

I changed a bit and it worked like this, dumped into one single array, provided all the images are of same dimensions.

png = []
for image_path in glob.glob("./train/*.png"):
    png.append(misc.imread(image_path))    

im = np.asarray(png)

print 'Importing done...', im.shape
  • 1
    Perfect. Great All-In-One Solution. I had stored images into an np.array, but then ran into trouble as the array had (shape == (num_images,) with each image (shape == (32,32,3)). Your solution (plus im = np.reshape(num_images,32,32,3) works brilliantly! :-) – SherylHohman Mar 29 '17 at 2:15
  • typo: I don't even need the reshape call above. In mine vexed hack, massaging it into that desired shape was getting messy. Thanks for the direct path. – SherylHohman Mar 29 '17 at 2:24
2

Using a (very) commonly used package is prefered:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
im = plt.imread('image.png')

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