217

Using setTimeout() it is possible to launch a function at a specified time:

setTimeout(function, 60000);

But what if I would like to launch the function multiple times? Every time a time interval passes, I would like to execute the function (every 60 seconds, let's say).

11 Answers 11

339

If you don't care if the code within the timer may take longer than your interval, use setInterval():

setInterval(function, delay)

That fires the function passed in as first parameter over and over.

A better approach is, to use setTimeout along with a self-executing anonymous function:

(function(){
    // do some stuff
    setTimeout(arguments.callee, 60000);
})();

that guarantees, that the next call is not made before your code was executed. I used arguments.callee in this example as function reference. It's a better way to give the function a name and call that within setTimeout because arguments.callee is deprecated in ecmascript 5.

  • 5
    It's not possible for the next call to be made before the code finishes executing. The timer counts down asynchronously but the callback has to be queued. This means that your callback may (and probably will) fire after more than 60 seconds. – Andy E Jun 29 '10 at 7:52
  • 13
    The difference is that setInterval will generally run the function x milliseconds after the start of the previous iteration, whereas the approach here will run the next iteration x milliseconds after the previous one ended – Gareth Jun 29 '10 at 8:14
  • 39
    Just as a note for others who may find this -- clearInterval() is a partner function to setInterval() and comes in handy if you want to cease your periodic function call. – Clay Sep 15 '11 at 14:15
  • 7
    Please note that setInterval executes the function for the first time after delay ms. So if you want to execute function immediately, and THEN repeat every delay, you should do: func(); setInterval(func, delay); – Marco Marsala Aug 6 '14 at 10:48
  • 3
    I just don't get this arguments.callee thing. I have getRates() function but (function(){getRates(); setTimeout(getRates(), 10000); })(); is not working :/ – darth0s Nov 8 '17 at 15:51
62

use the

setInterval(function, 60000);

EDIT : (In case if you want to stop the clock after it is started)

Script section

<script>
var int=self.setInterval(function, 60000);
</script>

and HTML Code

<!-- Stop Button -->
<a href="#" onclick="window.clearInterval(int);return false;">Stop</a>
  • In that case, how would you stop it from repeating after it had started repeating? – Anderson Green Nov 30 '12 at 23:32
  • it is simple. I will update the answer for that. – BlueBird Dec 1 '12 at 12:23
23

A better use of jAndy's answer to implement a polling function that polls every interval seconds, and ends after timeout seconds.

function pollFunc(fn, timeout, interval) {
    var startTime = (new Date()).getTime();
    interval = interval || 1000;

    (function p() {
        fn();
        if (((new Date).getTime() - startTime ) <= timeout)  {
            setTimeout(p, interval);
        }
    })();
}

pollFunc(sendHeartBeat, 60000, 1000);

UPDATE

As per the comment, updating it for the ability of the passed function to stop the polling:

function pollFunc(fn, timeout, interval) {
    var startTime = (new Date()).getTime();
    interval = interval || 1000,
    canPoll = true;

    (function p() {
        canPoll = ((new Date).getTime() - startTime ) <= timeout;
        if (!fn() && canPoll)  { // ensures the function exucutes
            setTimeout(p, interval);
        }
    })();
}

pollFunc(sendHeartBeat, 60000, 1000);

function sendHeartBeat(params) {
    ...
    ...
    if (receivedData) {
        // no need to execute further
        return true; // or false, change the IIFE inside condition accordingly.
    }
}
  • How would you stop the polling from within sendHeartBeat ? – temuri Sep 8 '15 at 17:28
  • 1
    @temuri, updated answer – Om Shankar Sep 14 '15 at 18:50
  • 1
    This is good example! When you use timers it harder to write unit tests, but with this approach - it's easy – Dmytro Medvid Sep 5 '16 at 17:18
  • Good answer. Please could you update one of the uses of new Date so that they are consistent, one uses (new Date).getTime() and the other (new Date()).getTime(). Both seem to work ok though – Mark Adamson Mar 7 '18 at 11:45
13

In jQuery you can do like this.

function random_no(){
     var ran=Math.random();
     jQuery('#random_no_container').html(ran);
}
           
window.setInterval(function(){
       /// call your function here
      random_no();
}, 6000);  // Change Interval here to test. For eg: 5000 for 5 sec
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<div id="random_no_container">
      Hello. Here you can see random numbers after every 6 sec
</div>

  • The number renews more or less every 12 seconds - shouldn't this be one minute? – Max Aug 3 '17 at 20:55
  • 1
    see comment // Change Interval here to test. For eg: 5000 for 5 sec Currently it is set to change every 6 seconds. use value 60000 for a minute – Optimum Creative Aug 4 '17 at 7:39
8
setInterval(fn,time)

is the method you're after.

7

You can simply call setTimeout at the end of the function. This will add it again to the event queue. You can use any kind of logic to vary the delay values. For example,

function multiStep() {
  // do some work here
  blah_blah_whatever();
  var newtime = 60000;
  if (!requestStop) {
    setTimeout(multiStep, newtime);
  }
}
6

Use window.setInterval(func, time).

1
// example:
// checkEach(1000, () => {
//   if(!canIDoWorkNow()) {
//     return true // try again after 1 second
//   }
//
//   doWork()
// })
export function checkEach(milliseconds, fn) {
  const timer = setInterval(
    () => {
      try {
        const retry = fn()

        if (retry !== true) {
          clearInterval(timer)
        }
      } catch (e) {
        clearInterval(timer)

        throw e
      }
    },
    milliseconds
  )
}
0

here we console natural number 0 to ......n (next number print in console every 60 sec.) , using setInterval()

var count = 0;
function abc(){
    count ++;
    console.log(count);
}
setInterval(abc,60*1000);
  • 1
    A bit of explanation about how it solves the issue would be great. – vahdet Mar 7 at 7:13
  • Hello dear @vahdet now its enough , and next time i will tack care about it. ): Hello dear @DebanjanB now its enough , and next time i will tack care about it. ):, and thanks for advice ): – vijay sadhu Mar 8 at 7:15
-1

There are 2 ways to call-

  1. setInterval(function (){ functionName();}, 60000);

  2. setInterval(functionName, 60000);

above function will call on every 60 seconds.

-1
(function(sec){
  setInterval(function(){
    // your function here
  }, sec * 1000);
})(60);
  • 3
    There are already 10 other answers on this question. It'd be good if you explained briefly how this is different to the other answers. – Wai Ha Lee Apr 28 at 19:34

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