3

maybe you will find the problem. The console always says:

TypeError: this._init is not a function. (In 'this._init()', 'this._init' is undefined)

nodes = [];
for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    var newNode = new Node(i*100,0);
    nodes.push(newNode);
};

function Node(posX, posY, parent) {
    if (typeof parent === 'undefined') { parent = 0; }
    this.parent = parent;
    this.children = [];
    this.text = "Node";
    this.posX = posX;
    this.posY = posY;
    this._init();

    this._init = function() {
        alert("test");
    }
}
1
  • Why should it be a function? You're defining it after trying to call it. Function expressions are not hoisted.
    – Teemu
    Jul 13, 2015 at 16:57

2 Answers 2

3

You need to define the function before invoking it:

function Node(posX, posY, parent) {
    if (typeof parent === 'undefined') { parent = 0; }
    this.parent = parent;
    this.children = [];
    this.text = "Node";
    this.posX = posX;
    this.posY = posY;

    this._init = function() {
        alert("test");
    }

    this._init();   
}

http://jsfiddle.net/4wsLhd8y/

You may be confused by this if you have invoked functions before they were defined elsewhere. Under certain conditions, your function could be "hoisted" to the top of your script. The following shows a completely legal invocation:

isItHoisted();

function isItHoisted() {
    console.log("Yes!");
}

http://adripofjavascript.com/blog/drips/variable-and-function-hoisting

As you are probably now aware, method functions on objects aren't hoisted, so you get the error you are seeing.

2
  • I have another script where it's working, even if the function is defined after the call!
    – Hustensaft
    Jul 13, 2015 at 17:00
  • @Hustensaft Added some more context. Jul 13, 2015 at 17:01
0

Looks like you are calling _init before you define it.

this._init = function() {
   alert('test');
}

this._init();
4
  • I have another script where it's working, even if the function is defined after the call!
    – Hustensaft
    Jul 13, 2015 at 17:00
  • I would not rely on that method. JS hoisting is a tricky thing to deal with, and will change in the next version by not being allowed at all for the most part. Functions are not typically hoisted.
    – Organiccat
    Jul 13, 2015 at 17:03
  • Is it possible to define a init-Method afterwards? For example with Node.prototype = {...}?
    – Hustensaft
    Jul 13, 2015 at 17:11
  • You can overwrite the method, yes. So after the initial setup (as seen above in my example), you could then do another "this._init = function () { }" I think any more on this and we'll need the use case for doing this in this manner. It is contrary to good coding standards.
    – Organiccat
    Jul 13, 2015 at 17:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.