100

I'm displaying a distance with one decimal, and I would like to remove this decimal in case it is equal to 0 (ex: 1200.0Km), how could I do that in swift? I'm displaying this number like this:

let distanceFloat: Float = (currentUser.distance! as NSString).floatValue
distanceLabel.text = String(format: "%.1f", distanceFloat) + "Km"
1

15 Answers 15

153

Swift 3/4:

var distanceFloat1: Float = 5.0
var distanceFloat2: Float = 5.540
var distanceFloat3: Float = 5.03

extension Float {
    var clean: String {
       return self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1) == 0 ? String(format: "%.0f", self) : String(self)
    }
}

print("Value \(distanceFloat1.clean)") // 5
print("Value \(distanceFloat2.clean)") // 5.54
print("Value \(distanceFloat3.clean)") // 5.03

Swift 2 (Original answer)

let distanceFloat: Float = (currentUser.distance! as NSString).floatValue
distanceLabel.text = String(format: distanceFloat == floor(distanceFloat) ? “%.0f" : "%.1f", distanceFloat) + "Km"

Or as an extension:

extension Float {
    var clean: String {
        return self % 1 == 0 ? String(format: "%.0f", self) : String(self)
    }
}
7
  • I added this line before distanceFloat = floor(distanceFloat * 10) / 10 and then it worked perfectly, thanks :) – Kali Aney Jul 13 '15 at 19:01
  • 1
    For Double, extension Double { var clean: String { return self % 1 == 0 ? String(format: "%.0d", self) : String(self) } } – Abo3atef Mar 20 '17 at 8:31
  • 3
    This will not work if the float is something like 3.01. – chengsam Jun 26 '17 at 4:03
  • What about negative numbers? – Happiehappie Jan 24 '19 at 5:16
  • It doesn't work for this 123456738.0 number, the converted number comes as 123456736 – Anirudha Mahale Jun 20 '19 at 9:59
135

Use NSNumberFormatter:

let formatter = NumberFormatter()
formatter.minimumFractionDigits = 0
formatter.maximumFractionDigits = 2

// Avoid not getting a zero on numbers lower than 1
// Eg: .5, .67, etc...
formatter.numberStyle = .decimal

let nums = [3.0, 5.1, 7.21, 9.311, 600.0, 0.5677, 0.6988]

for num in nums {
    print(formatter.string(from: num as NSNumber) ?? "n/a")
}

Returns:

3

5.1

7.21

9.31

600

0.57

0.7

8
  • 2
    perfect ! This needs to be on top – GoodSp33d Sep 12 '16 at 10:15
  • 6
    for Swift 3: let formatter = NumberFormatter() formatter.minimumFractionDigits = 0 formatter.maximumFractionDigits = 1 statLabel.text = formatter.string(from: value as NSNumber) ?? "n/a" – alexxjk Mar 21 '17 at 18:45
  • 1
    How about 0.3000, I try this get .3; I set its style formatter.numberStyle = .decimal – stan liu Apr 20 '18 at 8:16
  • @stanliu is correct, if you don't add the .decimal numberStyle numbers below 1 will display without a zero. Eg: .5, .78, etc... Editing the answer now. – HotFudgeSunday Jul 9 '18 at 17:46
  • I believe this is what apple intent to solve such problem. – DragonCherry Mar 22 '19 at 7:29
56

extension is the powerful way to do it.

Extension:

Code for Swift 2 (not Swift 3 or newer):

extension Float {
    var cleanValue: String {
        return self % 1 == 0 ? String(format: "%.0f", self) : String(self)
    }
}

Usage:

var sampleValue: Float = 3.234
print(sampleValue.cleanValue)

3.234

sampleValue = 3.0
print(sampleValue.cleanValue)

3

sampleValue = 3
print(sampleValue.cleanValue)

3


Sample Playground file is here.

3
  • 1
    But 3.230000 -> 3.230000... how about "-> 3.23" ? – CHiP-love-NY Mar 11 '16 at 10:10
  • 1
    @CHiP-love-NY, I didn't get you. – Ashok Mar 11 '16 at 10:33
  • 1
    I believe he thinks your extension doesn't remove trailing zeros but it does. String(3.230000) = "3.23" – jeffjv Jun 10 '16 at 20:17
33

Update of accepted answer for swift 3:

extension Float
{
    var cleanValue: String
    {
        return self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1) == 0 ? String(format: "%.0f", self) : String(self)
    }
}

usage would just be:

let someValue: Float = 3.0

print(someValue.cleanValue) //prints 3
3
  • Not working when you put ie. 14.000005, it converts to 14.0 – Vetuka Nov 20 '17 at 13:55
  • @sc13 Huh, that's weird, it does if you push it out to 14.00000005 at which point the float itself is returning 14 without 'cleanValue'. Think this has something to do with how swift handles Float. Going to see if I can fix that bug. – Christopher Larsen Nov 20 '17 at 22:34
  • 2
    I get the correct output for 14.000005, so @sc13 comment seems obsolete or incorrect. – Cœur Sep 17 '18 at 2:52
15

To format it to String, follow this pattern

let aFloat: Float = 1.123

let aString: String = String(format: "%.0f", aFloat) // "1"
let aString: String = String(format: "%.1f", aFloat) // "1.1"
let aString: String = String(format: "%.2f", aFloat) // "1.12"
let aString: String = String(format: "%.3f", aFloat) // "1.123"

To cast it to Int, follow this pattern

let aInt: Int = Int(aFloat) // "1"

When you use String(format: initializer, Swift will automatically round the final digit as needed based on the following number.

11

You can use an extension as already mentioned, this solution is a little shorter though:

extension Float {
    var shortValue: String {
        return String(format: "%g", self)
    }
}

Example usage:

var sample: Float = 3.234
print(sample.shortValue)
2
  • 1
    Will fail for 0.00000001. See documentation of %g at pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/printf.html: "The style used depends on the value converted; style e (or E ) shall be used only if the exponent resulting from such a conversion is less than -4 or greater than or equal to the precision." – Cœur Sep 17 '18 at 1:53
  • perfect. Thanks – PhillipJacobs Feb 28 '20 at 13:29
8

In Swift 4 try this.

    extension CGFloat{
        var cleanValue: String{
            //return String(format: 1 == floor(self) ? "%.0f" : "%.2f", self)
            return self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1) == 0 ? String(format: "%.0f", self) : String(format: "%.2f", self)//
        }
    }

//How to use - if you enter more then two-character after (.)point, it's automatically cropping the last character and only display two characters after the point.

let strValue = "32.12"
print(\(CGFloat(strValue).cleanValue)
3
  • Will not trim the zero from value 1.1: output will be "1.10". – Cœur Sep 17 '18 at 2:49
  • @Cœur it's used for display two value after point(.). if you want to display only one value then used " return self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1) == 0 ? String(format: "%.0f", self) : String(format: "%.1f", self)// " – Jaydip Sep 17 '18 at 3:18
  • I know... I was just describing how your code differs from some other answers behavior. – Cœur Sep 17 '18 at 3:26
7

Swift 5 for Double it's same as @Frankie's answer for float

var dec: Double = 1.0
dec.clean // 1

for the extension

extension Double {
    var clean: String {
       return self.truncatingRemainder(dividingBy: 1) == 0 ? String(format: "%.0f", self) : String(self)
    }

}
4

NSNumberFormatter is your friend

let distanceFloat: Float = (currentUser.distance! as NSString).floatValue
let numberFormatter = NSNumberFormatter()
numberFormatter.positiveFormat = "###0.##"
let distance = numberFormatter.stringFromNumber(NSNumber(float: distanceFloat))!
distanceLabel.text = distance + " Km"
4

Formatting with maximum fraction digits, without trailing zeros

This scenario is good when a custom output precision is desired. This solution seems roughly as fast as NumberFormatter + NSNumber solution from MirekE, but one benefit could be that we're avoiding NSObject here.

extension Double {
    func string(maximumFractionDigits: Int = 2) -> String {
        let s = String(format: "%.\(maximumFractionDigits)f", self)
        var offset = -maximumFractionDigits - 1
        for i in stride(from: 0, to: -maximumFractionDigits, by: -1) {
            if s[s.index(s.endIndex, offsetBy: i - 1)] != "0" {
                offset = i
                break
            }
        }
        return String(s[..<s.index(s.endIndex, offsetBy: offset)])
    }
}

(works also with extension Float, but not the macOS-only type Float80)

Usage: myNumericValue.string(maximumFractionDigits: 2) or myNumericValue.string()

Output for maximumFractionDigits: 2:

1.0 → "1"
0.12 → "0.12"
0.012 → "0.01"
0.0012 → "0"
0.00012 → "0"

3

Here's the full code.

let numberA: Float = 123.456
let numberB: Float = 789.000

func displayNumber(number: Float) {
    if number - Float(Int(number)) == 0 {
        println("\(Int(number))")
    } else {
        println("\(number)")
    }
}

displayNumber(numberA) // console output: 123.456
displayNumber(numberB) // console output: 789

Here's the most important line in-depth.

func displayNumber(number: Float) {
  1. Strips the float's decimal digits with Int(number).
  2. Returns the stripped number back to float to do an operation with Float(Int(number)).
  3. Gets the decimal-digit value with number - Float(Int(number))
  4. Checks the decimal-digit value is empty with if number - Float(Int(number)) == 0

The contents within the if and else statements doesn't need explaining.

1
  • In your case, you'd want to make the function return String and instead of the println(result) do return result. I hope this helps! – Fine Man Jul 14 '15 at 4:41
3

Simple :

Int(floor(myFloatValue))
3
  • 1
    Doesn't this always remove the decimal? OP doesn't want that. – Rakesha Shastri Feb 25 '20 at 9:35
  • very simple answer. – caesss Dec 10 '20 at 16:45
  • This will remove decimals always, not only when .0 – matiasdim Jun 11 at 23:46
2

This might be helpful too.

extension Float {
    func cleanValue() -> String {
        let intValue = Int(self)
        if self == 0 {return "0"}
        if self / Float (intValue) == 1 { return "\(intValue)" }
        return "\(self)"
    }
}

Usage:

let number:Float = 45.23230000
number.cleanValue()
0

Swift 5.5 makes it easy

Just use the new formatted() api with a default FloatingPointFormatStyle:

let values: [Double] = [1.0, 4.5, 100.0, 7]
for value in values {
    print(value.formatted(FloatingPointFormatStyle())
}
// prints "1, 4.5, 100, 7"
-1

Maybe stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString could help you :)

let aFloat: Float = 1.000

let aString: String = String(format: "%.1f", aFloat) // "1.0"

let wantedString: String = aString.stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString(".0", withString: "") // "1"
4
  • This would break a value like 1.05 --> 15 – Starceaker Sep 1 '16 at 17:42
  • @Starceaker No, 1.05 execute String(format: "%.1f", aFloat) first will be 1.0, works. if 1.05 execute String(format: "%.2f", aFloat) will be 1.05, and than should do this stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString(".00"...) – Leo Sep 8 '16 at 10:55
  • Correct, I focused on the last line. I thought you suggested several solutions but actually your lines are connected. My bad. – Starceaker Sep 9 '16 at 13:24
  • that's nothing :) – Leo Sep 14 '16 at 5:33

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