56

The parent element of the whole page is a centered div limited to a max-width of 960px. All other elements on the page are children of that parent div. The simplified structure is the following:

<div id="parent">
  <div id="something"></div>
  <div id="wide-div></div>
  <div id="something-else></div>
</div>

While the parent div shouldn't expand beyond a width of 960px, the div I called "wide-div" here should fill the entire width of the screen. It contains a single image that is wider than the 960px, and it should set a different background color for the entire width of the screen.

I can't easily take that div out of the parent div, it would mess up other parts of my layout and it would make the whole thing rather awkward.

I found a few tricks on how you can achieve this, but none seemed to fit my requirements. My design is responsive, or at least I'm trying to achieve that. The tricks I found relied on knowing the size of the involved elements, which is not fixed in my case.

Is there a way to expand the inner div to the full screen width in a responsive layout?

  • 1
    by giving your wide div a width in px will give you the result you want. Its just to make it responsive you will have to use javascript to calculate it based on window size. You can also try and use the css calc() function. – floor Jul 13 '15 at 19:14
  • I agree with @floor. Most wp themes that use wide sections calculate the width with javascript. The position:absolute approaches will probably fail to work on real websites. – Miro Jul 13 '15 at 19:28
  • Can set child div to width 100vw and parent to overflow visible – Felype Jul 13 '15 at 19:48
85

You can set the width based on the vw (viewport width). You can use that value too using the calc function, to calculate a left-margin for the div. This way you can position it inside the flow, but still sticking out on the left and right side of the centered fixed-width div.

Support is pretty good. vw is supported by all major browsers, including IE9+. The same goes for calc(). If you need to support IE8 or Opera Mini, you're out of luck with this method.

-edit-

As mentioned in the comments, when the content of the page is higher than the screen, this will result in a horizontal scrollbar. You can suppress that scrollbar using body {overflow-x: hidden;}. It would be nice though to solve it in a different way, but a solution using left and rightlike presented in Width:100% without scrollbars doesn't work in this situation.

div {
  min-height: 40px;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}
#parent {
  width: 400px;
  border: 1px solid black;
  margin: 0 auto;
}

#something {
  border: 2px solid red;
}

#wide-div {
  width: 100vw;
  margin-left: calc(-50vw + 50%);
  border: 2px solid green;
}
<div id="parent">
  <div id="something">Red</div>
  <div id="wide-div">Green</div>
  <div id="something-else">Other content, which is not behind Green as you can see.</div>
</div>

  • 2
    Warning: calc() is really buggy on iPad. – Miro Jul 13 '15 at 19:30
  • 1
    This to me is the best answer. Using position: absolute on wide-div would cause it to cover up something-else. – Rick Hitchcock Jul 13 '15 at 19:30
  • 2
    The remarks above only apply to older versions (IOS Safari 7.1), but the versions after that have proper support. – GolezTrol Jul 1 '16 at 11:07
  • 1
    @SabaAhang @GolezTrol I had the same problem, you can solve adding overflow-x: hidden to the body because sometimes it can take some pixels more. I would update the answer to advice this for future visitors. On the other hand, nice answer! – SilverSurfer Apr 12 '18 at 12:37
  • 1
    @SilverSurfer Thanks! I've added it. – GolezTrol Apr 12 '18 at 13:14
10

After much research, I found this solution: Creating full width (100% ) container inside fixed width container. I think that it is the best solution because it does not depend on any external factor, only the div that you want to expand.

<div class="container" style="width: 750px; margin: 0 auto;">
   <div class="row-full">
     --- Full width container ---
   </div>   
</div>

.row-full{
     width: 100vw;
     position: relative;
     margin-left: -50vw;
     left: 50%;
}
  • good idea, but breaks if viewport width becomes less than element width (body have min-width + browser window not wide enough) – zxcat Jun 10 '17 at 15:40
  • 2
    Just do your responsive design down to 320px wide and you really shouldn't have to worry about it breaking... but do watch out for the difference in scrollbars... I added a javascript to detect if the page has a visible scroll bar or transparent one. Then added .has-scrollbar .full-width { margin-left: calc((-100vw + 15px) / 2); margin-right: calc((-100vw + 15px) / 2); width: calc(100vw - 15px); } or .has-scrollbar .row-full in this case. – Coyote6 Oct 31 '18 at 17:30
6

Typically the responsive element, bootstrap or Foundation, allow you to add a "row" element. You can put the "wide-div" outside an element with "row" and it should expand to take up the full width.

Alternatively, you can use absolute positioning for that element which ignores most inherited settings:

.wide-div {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
}
  • till is not inside a parent of position relative – Nico Pernice Nov 8 '16 at 21:56
2

You can now do this

.full-width {
    margin-left: calc(50% - 50vw);
    margin-right: calc(50% - 50vw);
}

or this

.full-width {
    width: 100vw;
    position: relative;
    left: 50%;
    right: 50%;
    margin-left: -50vw;
    margin-right: -50vw;
}

More details: https://css-tricks.com/full-width-containers-limited-width-parents/

2

You can use vw. Demo http://jsfiddle.net/fsLhm6pk/

.parent {
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  background: red;
}

.child {
  width: 100vw;
  height: 50px;
  background: yellow;
}
<div class='parent'>
  <div class='child'></div>
</div>

You are right, this won't work with centered div. Try this instead:

EDIT http://jsfiddle.net/fsLhm6pk/1/

.parent {
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  background: red;
  margin: 0 auto;
}

.child {
  width: 100%;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  position: absolute;
  height: 50px;
  background: yellow;
}
<div class='parent'>
  <div class='child'></div>
</div>

  • Thia falls apart if the wrapper is centered. jsfiddle.net/jtz44br2 – Alexander O'Mara Jul 13 '15 at 19:12
  • My parent div is centered, this expands the child div to the right, but not to the left. – Mad Scientist Jul 13 '15 at 19:13
  • 1
    It also isn't supported by all browsers.. if you care about that. – floor Jul 13 '15 at 19:13
0

I'm a little surprised no one offered the following in the last 4 years. The css position:fixed property pulls the item out and scales it in relation to the window. There are some cases where maybe this doesn't work, but if you're Javascripting a modal box or something, this works fine.

.wide-div{
    position:fixed;
    top:0px;
    left:0px;
    width:100%;
    height:100%; // in case you need to cover the height as well
    background-color:rgba(0,0,0,.8); //just so you can see the div is on top of your content
    z-index:1; // you may need to adjust the index of your other elements as well
}

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