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I have a legacy code segment that always encode('utf-8') for me when I pass in an unicode string (directly from database), is there a way to change unicode string to other format to allow it to be encoded to 'utf-8' again without getting an error, since I am not allowed to change the legacy code segment.

I've tried decoding it first but it returns this error

UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode characters in position 0-1: ordinal not in range(128)

If I leave the unicode string as is it returns

UnicodeDecodeError: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0xe8 in position 986: ordinal not in range(128)

If I change the legacy code to not encode('utf-8') it works, but this is not a viable option

Edit:

Here is the code snippet

#!/usr/bin/env python2
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-



if __name__ == "__main__":
   # 1
   a = u'贸易'
   # 2
   a = a.decode('utf-8')
   # 3
   a.encode('utf-8')

For some reason if I skip #2 I don't get the error that I mentioned above, I double check the type for the string, it seems like both is unicode, and both is the same character, but the code I am working on does not allow me to encode or decode to utf-8 , while the same character in some snippet allows me to do that.

  • can you write the text you want to represent please? – omri_saadon Jul 13 '15 at 21:01
  • Works for me. Please provide a short complete program that demonstrates the problem you are seeing. See stackoverflow.com/help/mcve for more information. – Robᵩ Jul 13 '15 at 21:01
  • 1
    Now that a code snippet is provided, the problem is clear: This code isn't trying to double-encode a string; its problem is that it's trying to decode a unicode string, when the valid operation to get a bytestring from it is encode(). – Charles Duffy Jul 13 '15 at 21:16
  • 2
    Consider the following cases: (1) If you want a unicode string, and you already have a unicode string, you need do nothing. (2) If you want a bytestring, and you already have a bytestring, you need do nothing. (3) If you have a unicode string and want a bytestring, you encode it. (4) If you have a bytestring and want a unicode string, you decode it. In none of these cases do you encode or decode more than once. – Charles Duffy Jul 13 '15 at 21:27
  • @Charles: I think that's the clearest way to put it. I'd upvote that if you submitted it as an answer. – Cameron Jul 13 '15 at 21:39
5

Consider the following cases:

  1. If you want a unicode string, and you already have a unicode string, you need do nothing.
  2. If you want a bytestring, and you already have a bytestring, you need do nothing.
  3. If you have a unicode string and want a bytestring, you encode it.
  4. If you have a bytestring and want a unicode string, you decode it.

In none of these cases is it appropriate to encode or decode more than once.

3

In order for encode('utf-8') to make sense, the string must be a unicode string (or contain all-ASCII characters...). So, unless it's a unicode instance already, you have to decode it first from whatever encoding it's in to a unicode string, after which you can pass it into your legacy interface.

At no point does it make sense for anything to be double-encoded -- encoding takes a string and transforms it to a series of bytes; decoding takes a series of bytes and transforms them back into a string. The confusion only arises because Python 2 uses the str for both plain-ASCII strings and byte sequences.

>>> u'é'.encode('utf-8')    # unicode string
'\xc3\xa9'                  # bytes, not unicode string
>>> '\xc3\xa9'.decode('utf-8')
u'\xe9'                     # unicode string
>>> u'\xe9' == u'é'
True
  • 1
    And: '贸易' == u'贸易' is False – itsafire Jul 13 '15 at 21:36

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