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I am just a beginner to programming, and Java. As I have very, very little experience with Java, I would like a simple, yet in depth explanation of this code. This code uses two classes and many methods.

Class Apples:

package jacob;
import java.util.Scanner;

class apples {
public static void main (String args[]){
    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    grapes gobject = new grapes();

    System.out.println("Enter name of first gf here: ");
    String temp = input.nextLine();
    gobject.setName(temp);
    gobject.saying();



}
}

Class Grapes:

package jacob;
public class grapes {
private String girlName;
public void setName(String name){
    girlName=name;
}
public String getName(){
    return girlName;
}
public void saying(){
    System.out.printf("Your first gf was %s", getName());
}
}

I get confused when I get to these two parts:

gobject.setName(temp);
    gobject.saying();

AND

private String girlName;
public void setName(String name){
    girlName=name;
}
public String getName(){
    return girlName;
}
public void saying(){
    System.out.printf("Your first gf was %s", getName());

Why would one go through so much trouble when they could have done:

package jacob;
import java.util.Scanner;
public class test {
public static void main (String args[]){
    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("Enter name of first gf here: ");
    String gfname = input.nextLine();
    System.out.println("The name of your first gf is " + gfname + ".");
}
}

Please note that the original code is from TheNewBoston and is not mine. The second bit of code is what I have created.

1
  • Read as much as you can about object-oriented programming. The example you showed is designed to illustrate some ideas about classes. Your question is much too broad to be answered here. – user3821934 Jul 14 '15 at 0:32
1

Your question is about fundamentals of object oriented programming. The reason for your confusion is that the method saying() and as a whole the program is trivial. In any non trivial program it is impossible to avoid using a method or object. Since the body of the method is one line you can replace it with a simple println but if the body is more complex you will have a hard time repeating it for more than one name. For example let's assume the method saying() is this:

public void saying(){
    String name = getName(); //saves the name in a variable
    StringBuilder reverse = new StringBuilder(name.length()); //Creates a new variable to hold the reversed name
    for(i=name.length()-1;i>=0;i--){ //This loops through the characters in name and makes the reversed name
        reverseapend(name.charAt(i);
    }
    System.out.println("The reverse of your gf name is" + reverse + ".");
}

This method still prints one line but with a slightly more complex body. Consider you want to reverse three names and print them. Which one is easier setting a field and calling a method three times or typing the whole method body three times? What if you want to reverse another string in another part o your program. You can easily reuse the method instead of typing this chunk of code every time you need it. This is just one of the many benefits of using objects. You can read about abstraction, encapsulation and inheritance to understand the importance of objects. This is a very broad topic to be accommodated in a simple answer. The best thing is to read a book about object oriented programming.

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