786

I want to convert a std::string to lowercase. I am aware of the function tolower(), however in the past I have had issues with this function and it is hardly ideal anyway as use with a std::string would require iterating over each character.

Is there an alternative which works 100% of the time?

  • 36
    How else would you convert each element of a list of anything to something else, without iterating through the list? A string is just a list of characters, if you need to apply some function to each character, your going to have to iterate through the string. No way around that. – user21037 Nov 24 '08 at 12:14
  • 15
    Why exactly does this question mert down rating? I don't have a problem with iterating through my string, but I am asking if there are other functions apart from tolower(), toupper() etc. – Konrad Nov 24 '08 at 12:24
  • 3
    If you have a C style char array, then I guess you may be able to add ox20202020 to each block of 4 characters (provided they are ALL already uppercase) to convert 4 characters to lowercase at a time. – user21037 Nov 24 '08 at 13:05
  • 13
    @Dan: If they might already be lowercase, but are definitely A-Z or a-z, you can OR with 0x20 instead of adding. One of those so-smart-it's-probably-dumb optimisations that are almost never worth it... – Steve Jessop Nov 24 '08 at 13:11
  • 4
    I don't know why it would've been down-voted... certainly it's worded a little oddly (because you do have to iterate through every item somehow), but it's a valid question – warren Nov 24 '08 at 13:19

25 Answers 25

915
1

Adapted from Not So Frequently Asked Questions:

#include <algorithm>
#include <cctype>
#include <string>

std::string data = "Abc";
std::transform(data.begin(), data.end(), data.begin(),
    [](unsigned char c){ return std::tolower(c); });

You're really not going to get away without iterating through each character. There's no way to know whether the character is lowercase or uppercase otherwise.

If you really hate tolower(), here's a specialized ASCII-only alternative that I don't recommend you use:

char asciitolower(char in) {
    if (in <= 'Z' && in >= 'A')
        return in - ('Z' - 'z');
    return in;
}

std::transform(data.begin(), data.end(), data.begin(), asciitolower);

Be aware that tolower() can only do a per-single-byte-character substitution, which is ill-fitting for many scripts, especially if using a multi-byte-encoding like UTF-8.

| improve this answer | |
  • 25
    (Old it may be, the algorithms in question have changed little) @Stefan Mai: What kind of "whole lot of overhead" is there in calling STL algorithms? The functions are rather lean (i.e. simple for loops) and often inlined as you rarely have many calls to the same function with the same template parameters in the same compile unit. – eq- Nov 11 '11 at 22:14
  • 257
    Every time you assume characters are ASCII, God kills a kitten. :( – Brian Gordon Feb 10 '14 at 20:49
  • 13
    Your first example potentially has undefined behaviour (passing char to ::tolower(int).) You need to ensure you don't pass a negative value. – juanchopanza May 29 '14 at 17:30
  • 37
    -1 this use of ::tolower may well crash, it's UB for non-ASCII input. – Cheers and hth. - Alf May 29 '14 at 17:34
  • 7
    The :: is needed before tolower to indicate that it is in the outermost namespace. If you use this code in another namespace, there may be a different (possibly unrelated) definition of tolower which would end up being preferentially selected without the ::. – Charles Ofria Jul 30 '16 at 16:43
321
0

Boost provides a string algorithm for this:

#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>

std::string str = "HELLO, WORLD!";
boost::algorithm::to_lower(str); // modifies str

Or, for non-in-place:

#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>

const std::string str = "HELLO, WORLD!";
const std::string lower_str = boost::algorithm::to_lower_copy(str);
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I assume this hasn't got the same issues as tolower with ASCII input? – paulm Jan 8 '15 at 11:32
  • 19
    Fails for non-ASCII-7. – DevSolar Feb 27 '15 at 9:28
  • 1
    Is there a non-in-place version of this? – Ray Jun 29 '17 at 17:46
  • 5
    @Ray, yes, to_lower_copy – smac89 Aug 17 '17 at 5:41
237
0

tl;dr

Use the ICU library. If you don't, your conversion routine will silently break on cases you are probably not aware of even existing.


First you have to answer a question: What is the encoding of your std::string? Is it ISO-8859-1? Or perhaps ISO-8859-8? Or Windows Codepage 1252? Does whatever you're using to convert upper-to-lowercase know that? (Or does it fail miserably for characters over 0x7f?)

If you are using UTF-8 (the only sane choice among the 8-bit encodings) with std::string as container, you are already deceiving yourself into believing that you are still in control of things, because you are storing a multibyte character sequence in a container that is not aware of the multibyte concept. Even something as simple as .substr() is a ticking timebomb. (Because splitting a multibyte sequence will result in an invalid (sub-) string.)

And as soon as you try something like std::toupper( 'ß' ), in any encoding, you are in deep trouble. (Because it's simply not possible to do this "right" with the standard library, which can only deliver one result character, not the "SS" needed here.) [1] Another example would be std::tolower( 'I' ), which should yield different results depending on the locale. In Germany, 'i' would be correct; in Turkey, 'ı' (LATIN SMALL LETTER DOTLESS I) is the expected result (which, again, is more than one byte in UTF-8 encoding). Yet another example is the Greek Sigma, uppercase '∑', lowercase 'σ'... except at the end of a word, where it is 'ς'.

So, any case conversion that works on a character at a time, or worse, a byte at a time, is broken by design.

Then there is the point that the standard library, for what it is capable of doing, is depending on which locales are supported on the machine your software is running on... and what do you do if it isn't?

So what you are really looking for is a string class that is capable of dealing with all this correctly, and that is not any of the std::basic_string<> variants.

(C++11 note: std::u16string and std::u32string are better, but still not perfect. C++20 brought std::u8string, but all these do is specify the encoding. In many other respects they still remain ignorant of Unicode mechanics, like normalization, collation, ...)

While Boost looks nice, API wise, Boost.Locale is basically a wrapper around ICU. If Boost is compiled with ICU support... if it isn't, Boost.Locale is limited to the locale support compiled for the standard library.

And believe me, getting Boost to compile with ICU can be a real pain sometimes. (There are no pre-compiled binaries for Windows, so you'd have to supply them together with your application, and that opens a whole new can of worms...)

So personally I would recommend getting full Unicode support straight from the horse's mouth and using the ICU library directly:

#include <unicode/unistr.h>
#include <unicode/ustream.h>
#include <unicode/locid.h>

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    /*                          "Odysseus" */
    char const * someString = u8"ΟΔΥΣΣΕΥΣ";
    icu::UnicodeString someUString( someString, "UTF-8" );
    // Setting the locale explicitly here for completeness.
    // Usually you would use the user-specified system locale,
    // which *does* make a difference (see ı vs. i above).
    std::cout << someUString.toLower( "el_GR" ) << "\n";
    std::cout << someUString.toUpper( "el_GR" ) << "\n";
    return 0;
}

Compile (with G++ in this example):

g++ -Wall example.cpp -licuuc -licuio

This gives:

ὀδυσσεύς

Note that the Σ<->σ conversion in the middle of the word, and the Σ<->ς conversion at the end of the word. No <algorithm>-based solution can give you that.


[1] In 2017, the Council for German Orthography ruled that "ẞ" U+1E9E LATIN CAPITAL LETTER SHARP S could be used officially, as an option beside the traditional "SS" conversion to avoid ambiguity e.g. in passports (where names are capitalized). My beautiful go-to example, made obsolete by committee decision...

| improve this answer | |
  • 19
    This is the correct answer in the general case. The standard gives nothing for handling anything except "ASCII" except lies and deception. It makes you think you can maybe deal with maybe UTF-16, but you can't. As this answer says, you cannot get the proper character-length (not byte-length) of a UTF-16 string without doing your own unicode handling. If you have to deal with real text, use ICU. Thanks, @DevSolar – Limited Atonement Mar 25 '15 at 14:00
  • Is ICU available by default on Ubuntu/Windows or needs to be install separately? Also how about this answer:stackoverflow.com/a/35075839/207661? – Shital Shah May 11 '16 at 19:00
  • 1
    Hey, look, a real answer! Thanks for pointing me in the right direct, DevSolar. – Dan Bechard Jul 22 '16 at 14:58
  • 2
    @DevSolar Agreed! The concept of length is rather meaningless on text (we could add ligatures to the list of offenders). That said, since people are used to tabs and control chars taking up one length unit, code points would be the more intuitive measure. Oh, and thanks for giving the correct answer, sad to see it so far down :-( – masaers Jun 15 '17 at 6:51
  • 3
    @L.F. Marginally better. But so many things are still not covered: toupper and tolower still work on single characters. The string class still has no notion of normalisation (e.g. whether an "ü" is encoded as "u with diaeresis" or "u + combining diaeresis") or where a string may or may not be separated. The list goes on. u8string is (like the other standard string classes) appropriate for "passing through". But if you want to process Unicode, you need ICU. – DevSolar Jul 6 '19 at 9:31
36
0

Using range-based for loop of C++11 a simpler code would be :

#include <iostream>       // std::cout
#include <string>         // std::string
#include <locale>         // std::locale, std::tolower

int main ()
{
  std::locale loc;
  std::string str="Test String.\n";

 for(auto elem : str)
    std::cout << std::tolower(elem,loc);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    However, on a french machine, this program doesn't convert non ASCII characters allowed in the french language. For instance a string 'Test String123. É Ï\n' will be converted to : 'test string123. É Ï\n' although characters É Ï and their lower case couterparts 'é' and 'ï', are allowed in french. It seems that no solution for that was provided by other messages of this thread. – incises Oct 9 '13 at 8:15
  • 1
    I think you need to set a proper locale for that. – user1095108 Dec 30 '13 at 8:37
  • @incises, this then someone posted an answer about ICU and that's certainly the way to go. Easier than most other solutions that would attempt to understand the locale. – Alexis Wilke Sep 1 '16 at 21:25
  • I'd prefer to not use external libraries when possible, personally. – kayleeFrye_onDeck Jul 11 '17 at 0:54
31
0

If the string contains UTF-8 characters outside of the ASCII range, then boost::algorithm::to_lower will not convert those. Better use boost::locale::to_lower when UTF-8 is involved. See http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_51_0/libs/locale/doc/html/conversions.html

| improve this answer | |
15
0

This is a follow-up to Stefan Mai's response: if you'd like to place the result of the conversion in another string, you need to pre-allocate its storage space prior to calling std::transform. Since STL stores transformed characters at the destination iterator (incrementing it at each iteration of the loop), the destination string will not be automatically resized, and you risk memory stomping.

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

int main (int argc, char* argv[])
{
  std::string sourceString = "Abc";
  std::string destinationString;

  // Allocate the destination space
  destinationString.resize(sourceString.size());

  // Convert the source string to lower case
  // storing the result in destination string
  std::transform(sourceString.begin(),
                 sourceString.end(),
                 destinationString.begin(),
                 ::tolower);

  // Output the result of the conversion
  std::cout << sourceString
            << " -> "
            << destinationString
            << std::endl;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This did not resize Ä into ä for me – Purefan Jan 23 '16 at 16:12
  • Could also use a back inserter iterator here instead of manual resize. – chili Apr 24 '17 at 1:57
11
0

Another approach using range based for loop with reference variable

string test = "Hello World";
for(auto& c : test)
{
   c = tolower(c);
}

cout<<test<<endl;
| improve this answer | |
6
0

As far as I see Boost libraries are really bad performance-wise. I have tested their unordered_map to STL and it was average 3 times slower (best case 2, worst was 10 times). Also this algorithm looks too low.

The difference is so big that I am sure whatever addition you will need to do to tolower to make it equal to boost "for your needs" will be way faster than boost.

I have done these tests on an Amazon EC2, therefore performance varied during the test but you still get the idea.

./test
Elapsed time: 12365milliseconds
Elapsed time: 1640milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 26978milliseconds
Elapsed time: 1646milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 6957milliseconds
Elapsed time: 1634milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 23177milliseconds
Elapsed time: 2421milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 17342milliseconds
Elapsed time: 14132milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 7355milliseconds
Elapsed time: 1645milliseconds

-O2 made it like this:

./test
Elapsed time: 3769milliseconds
Elapsed time: 565milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 3815milliseconds
Elapsed time: 565milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 3643milliseconds
Elapsed time: 566milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 22018milliseconds
Elapsed time: 566milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 3845milliseconds
Elapsed time: 569milliseconds

Source:

string str;
bench.start();
for(long long i=0;i<1000000;i++)
{
    str="DSFZKMdskfdsjfsdfJDASFNSDJFXCKVdnjsafnjsdfjdnjasnJDNASFDJDSFSDNJjdsanjfsdnfjJNFSDJFSD";
    boost::algorithm::to_lower(str);
}
bench.end();

bench.start();
for(long long i=0;i<1000000;i++)
{
    str="DSFZKMdskfdsjfsdfJDASFNSDJFXCKVdnjsafnjsdfjdnjasnJDNASFDJDSFSDNJjdsanjfsdnfjJNFSDJFSD";
    for(unsigned short loop=0;loop < str.size();loop++)
    {
        str[loop]=tolower(str[loop]);
    }
}
bench.end();

I guess I should to the tests on a dedicated machine but I will be using this EC2 so I do not really need to test it on my machine.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Have you opened the optimization options when compiling it? I am thinking the STL heavy boost library should run better with high optimization level. – Wei Song Aug 15 '12 at 16:16
  • 1
    I used -O2 in one of the tests, and nothing else. – Etherealone Aug 15 '12 at 16:18
  • 2
    Performance of unordered_map depends the hashing algorithm combined with the data you're using. There isn't a magic hashing algorithm that works for all and any data to make the unordered_map as fast as possible. Benchmark and try different things. The reason you're getting worse performance, is because with the hash you're using you're getting a lot of collisions, which basically causes a lookup in a list. Check out this site for more info: fgda.pl/post/7/gcc-hash-map-vs-unordered-map For my purposes, the function provided at the link reduced collisions and thus was very fast. – leetNightshade Sep 18 '12 at 15:46
6
0

Simplest way to convert string into loweercase without bothering about std namespace is as follows

1:string with/without spaces

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;
int main(){
    string str;
    getline(cin,str);
//------------function to convert string into lowercase---------------
    transform(str.begin(), str.end(), str.begin(), ::tolower);
//--------------------------------------------------------------------
    cout<<str;
    return 0;
}

2:string without spaces

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;
int main(){
    string str;
    cin>>str;
//------------function to convert string into lowercase---------------
    transform(str.begin(), str.end(), str.begin(), ::tolower);
//--------------------------------------------------------------------
    cout<<str;
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
5
0

std::ctype::tolower() from the standard C++ Localization library will correctly do this for you. Here is an example extracted from the tolower reference page

#include <locale>
#include <iostream>

int main () {
  std::locale::global(std::locale("en_US.utf8"));
  std::wcout.imbue(std::locale());
  std::wcout << "In US English UTF-8 locale:\n";
  auto& f = std::use_facet<std::ctype<wchar_t>>(std::locale());
  std::wstring str = L"HELLo, wORLD!";
  std::wcout << "Lowercase form of the string '" << str << "' is ";
  f.tolower(&str[0], &str[0] + str.size());
  std::wcout << "'" << str << "'\n";
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Nice, as long as you can convert the characters in place. What if your source string is const? That seems to make it a bit more messy (e.g. it doesn't look like you can use f.tolower() ), since you need to put the characters in a new string. Would you use transform() and something like std::bind1st( std::mem_fun() ) for the operator? – quazar Aug 17 '16 at 6:09
  • For a const string, we can just make a local copy and then convert it in place. – Sameer Aug 29 '16 at 14:53
  • Yeah, though, making a copy adds more overhead. – quazar Sep 4 '16 at 20:49
  • You could use std::transform with the version of ctype::tolower that does not take pointers. Use a back inserter iterator adapter and you don't even need to worry about pre-sizing your output string. – chili Apr 24 '17 at 2:11
  • Great, especially because in libstdc++'s tolower with locale parameter, the implicit call to use_facet appears to be a performance bottleneck. One of my coworkers has achieved a several 100% speed increase by replacing boost::iequals (which has this problem) with a version where use_facet is only called once outside of the loop. – Arne Vogel May 23 '17 at 12:23
3
0

An alternative to Boost is POCO (pocoproject.org).

POCO provides two variants:

  1. The first variant makes a copy without altering the original string.
  2. The second variant changes the original string in place.
    "In Place" versions always have "InPlace" in the name.

Both versions are demonstrated below:

#include "Poco/String.h"
using namespace Poco;

std::string hello("Stack Overflow!");

// Copies "STACK OVERFLOW!" into 'newString' without altering 'hello.'
std::string newString(toUpper(hello));

// Changes newString in-place to read "stack overflow!"
toLowerInPlace(newString);
| improve this answer | |
3
0

There is a way to convert upper case to lower WITHOUT doing if tests, and it's pretty straight-forward. The isupper() function/macro's use of clocale.h should take care of problems relating to your location, but if not, you can always tweak the UtoL[] to your heart's content.

Given that C's characters are really just 8-bit ints (ignoring the wide character sets for the moment) you can create a 256 byte array holding an alternative set of characters, and in the conversion function use the chars in your string as subscripts into the conversion array.

Instead of a 1-for-1 mapping though, give the upper-case array members the BYTE int values for the lower-case characters. You may find islower() and isupper() useful here.

enter image description here

The code looks like this...

#include <clocale>
static char UtoL[256];
// ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
void InitUtoLMap()  {
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(UtoL); i++)  {
        if (isupper(i)) {
            UtoL[i] = (char)(i + 32);
        }   else    {
            UtoL[i] = i;
        }
    }
}
// ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
char *LowerStr(char *szMyStr) {
    char *p = szMyStr;
    // do conversion in-place so as not to require a destination buffer
    while (*p) {        // szMyStr must be null-terminated
        *p = UtoL[*p];  
        p++;
    }
    return szMyStr;
}
// ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
int main() {
    time_t start;
    char *Lowered, Upper[128];
    InitUtoLMap();
    strcpy(Upper, "Every GOOD boy does FINE!");

    Lowered = LowerStr(Upper);
    return 0;
}

This approach will, at the same time, allow you to remap any other characters you wish to change.

This approach has one huge advantage when running on modern processors, there is no need to do branch prediction as there are no if tests comprising branching. This saves the CPU's branch prediction logic for other loops, and tends to prevent pipeline stalls.

Some here may recognize this approach as the same one used to convert EBCDIC to ASCII.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    "There is a way to convert upper case to lower WITHOUT doing if tests" ever heard of lookup tables? – Gábor Buella Dec 16 '14 at 0:10
  • 1
    Undefined behavior for negative chars. – Roland Illig Nov 21 '17 at 7:06
  • Modern CPUs are bottlenecked in memory not CPU. Benchmarking would be interesting. – Contango Apr 14 at 15:12
3
0

Since none of the answers mentioned the upcoming Ranges library, which is available in the standard library since C++20, and currently separately available on GitHub as range-v3, I would like to add a way to perform this conversion using it.

To modify the string in-place:

str |= action::transform([](unsigned char c){ return std::tolower(c); });

To generate a new string:

auto new_string = original_string
    | view::transform([](unsigned char c){ return std::tolower(c); });

(Don't forget to #include <cctype> and the required Ranges headers.)

Note: the use of unsigned char as the argument to the lambda is inspired by cppreference, which states:

Like all other functions from <cctype>, the behavior of std::tolower is undefined if the argument's value is neither representable as unsigned char nor equal to EOF. To use these functions safely with plain chars (or signed chars), the argument should first be converted to unsigned char:

char my_tolower(char ch)
{
    return static_cast<char>(std::tolower(static_cast<unsigned char>(ch)));
}

Similarly, they should not be directly used with standard algorithms when the iterator's value type is char or signed char. Instead, convert the value to unsigned char first:

std::string str_tolower(std::string s) {
    std::transform(s.begin(), s.end(), s.begin(), 
                // static_cast<int(*)(int)>(std::tolower)         // wrong
                // [](int c){ return std::tolower(c); }           // wrong
                // [](char c){ return std::tolower(c); }          // wrong
                   [](unsigned char c){ return std::tolower(c); } // correct
                  );
    return s;
}
| improve this answer | |
3
0

My own template functions which performs upper / lower case.

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>

//
//  Lowercases string
//
template <typename T>
std::basic_string<T> lowercase(const std::basic_string<T>& s)
{
    std::basic_string<T> s2 = s;
    std::transform(s2.begin(), s2.end(), s2.begin(), tolower);
    return std::move(s2);
}

//
// Uppercases string
//
template <typename T>
std::basic_string<T> uppercase(const std::basic_string<T>& s)
{
    std::basic_string<T> s2 = s;
    std::transform(s2.begin(), s2.end(), s2.begin(), toupper);
    return std::move(s2);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This is what I needed. I just used the towlower for wide characters which supports the UTF-16. – Juv Apr 28 at 8:07
2
0

Here's a macro technique if you want something simple:

#define STRTOLOWER(x) std::transform (x.begin(), x.end(), x.begin(), ::tolower)
#define STRTOUPPER(x) std::transform (x.begin(), x.end(), x.begin(), ::toupper)
#define STRTOUCFIRST(x) std::transform (x.begin(), x.begin()+1, x.begin(),  ::toupper); std::transform (x.begin()+1, x.end(),   x.begin()+1,::tolower)

However, note that @AndreasSpindler's comment on this answer still is an important consideration, however, if you're working on something that isn't just ASCII characters.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I'm downvoting this for giving macros when a perfectly good solution exist -- you even give those solutions. – Clearer Nov 7 '17 at 7:44
  • 2
    The macro technique means less typing of code for something that one would commonly use a lot in programming. Why not use that? Otherwise, why have macros at all? – Volomike Nov 7 '17 at 8:02
  • 3
    Macros are a legacy from C that's being worked hard on to get rid of. If you want to reduce the amount of typing, use a function or a lambda. void strtoupper(std::string& x) { std::transform (x.begin(), x.end(), x.begin(), ::toupper); } – Clearer Nov 7 '17 at 12:11
  • 1
    @Clearer As I want to be a better coder, can you provide me any ANSI doc links where any ANSI C++ committees say something to the effect of, "We need to call a meeting to get rid of macros out of C++"? Or some other roadmap? – Volomike Nov 7 '17 at 20:47
  • 2
    No, I can't. Bjarne's stance on the topic has been made pretty clear on several occasions though. Besides, there are plenty of reasons to not use macros in C as well as C++. x could be a valid expression, that just happens to compile correctly but will give completely bogus results because of the macros. – Clearer Nov 8 '17 at 12:02
2
0
// tolower example (C++)
#include <iostream>       // std::cout
#include <string>         // std::string
#include <locale>         // std::locale, std::tolower

int main ()
{
  std::locale loc;
  std::string str="Test String.\n";
  for (std::string::size_type i=0; i<str.length(); ++i)
    std::cout << std::tolower(str[i],loc);
  return 0;
}

For more information: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/locale/tolower/

| improve this answer | |
2
0

Is there an alternative which works 100% of the time?

No

There are several questions you need to ask yourself before choosing a lowercasing method.

  1. How is the string encoded? plain ASCII? UTF-8? some form of extended ASCII legacy encoding?
  2. What do you mean by lower case anyway? Case mapping rules vary between languages! Do you want something that is localised to the users locale? do you want something that behaves consistently on all systems your software runs on? Do you just want to lowercase ASCII characters and pass through everything else?
  3. What libraries are available?

Once you have answers to those questions you can start looking for a soloution that fits your needs. There is no one size fits all that works for everyone everywhere!

| improve this answer | |
2
0

Try this function :)

string toLowerCase(string str) {

    int str_len = str.length();

    string final_str = "";

    for(int i=0; i<str_len; i++) {

        char character = str[i];

        if(character>=65 && character<=92) {

            final_str += (character+32);

        } else {

            final_str += character;

        }

    }

    return final_str;

}
| improve this answer | |
1
0

On microsoft platforms you can use the strlwr family of functions: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hkxwh33z.aspx

// crt_strlwr.c
// compile with: /W3
// This program uses _strlwr and _strupr to create
// uppercase and lowercase copies of a mixed-case string.
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main( void )
{
   char string[100] = "The String to End All Strings!";
   char * copy1 = _strdup( string ); // make two copies
   char * copy2 = _strdup( string );

   _strlwr( copy1 ); // C4996
   _strupr( copy2 ); // C4996

   printf( "Mixed: %s\n", string );
   printf( "Lower: %s\n", copy1 );
   printf( "Upper: %s\n", copy2 );

   free( copy1 );
   free( copy2 );
}
| improve this answer | |
1
0

Use fplus::to_lower_case() from fplus library.

Search to_lower_case in fplus API Search

Example:

fplus::to_lower_case(std::string("ABC")) == std::string("abc");
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1
0

C++ doesn't have tolower or toupper methods implemented for std::string, but it is available for char. One can easily read each char of string, convert it into required case and put it back into string. A sample code without using any third party library:

#include<iostream>

int main(){
    std::string str = std::string("How IS The Josh");
    for(char &ch : str){
        ch = std::tolower(ch);
    }
    std::cout<<str<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

For character based operation on string : For every character in string

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0
0

Code Snippet

#include<bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;


int main ()
{
    ios::sync_with_stdio(false);

    string str="String Convert\n";

    for(int i=0; i<str.size(); i++)
    {
      str[i] = tolower(str[i]);
    }
    cout<<str<<endl;

    return 0;
}
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0
0

Copy because it was disallowed to improve answer. Thanks SO


string test = "Hello World";
for(auto& c : test)
{
   c = tolower(c);
}

Explanation:

for(auto& c : test) is a range-based for loop of the kind
for (range_declaration:range_expression)loop_statement:

  1. range_declaration: auto& c
    Here the auto specifier is used for for automatic type deduction. So the type gets deducted from the variables initializer.

  2. range_expression: test
    The range in this case are the characters of string test.

The characters of the string test are available as a reference inside the for loop through identifier c.

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  • Please clarify where did you copy your answer from. – bfontaine Apr 17 '18 at 12:48
-2
0

This could be another simple version to convert uppercase to lowercase and vice versa. I used VS2017 community version to compile this source code.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    std::string _input = "lowercasetouppercase";
#if 0
    // My idea is to use the ascii value to convert
    char upperA = 'A';
    char lowerA = 'a';

    cout << (int)upperA << endl; // ASCII value of 'A' -> 65
    cout << (int)lowerA << endl; // ASCII value of 'a' -> 97
    // 97-65 = 32; // Difference of ASCII value of upper and lower a
#endif // 0

    cout << "Input String = " << _input.c_str() << endl;
    for (int i = 0; i < _input.length(); ++i)
    {
        _input[i] -= 32; // To convert lower to upper
#if 0
        _input[i] += 32; // To convert upper to lower
#endif // 0
    }
    cout << "Output String = " << _input.c_str() << endl;

    return 0;
}

Note: if there are special characters then need to be handled using condition check.

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-8
0

I tried std::transform, all i get is abominable stl criptic compilation error that only druids from 200 years ago can understand (cannot convert from to flibidi flabidi flu)

this works fine and can be easily tweaked

string LowerCase(string s)
{
    int dif='a'-'A';
    for(int i=0;i<s.length();i++)
    {
        if((s[i]>='A')&&(s[i]<='Z'))
            s[i]+=dif;
    }
   return s;
}

string UpperCase(string s)
{
   int dif='a'-'A';
    for(int i=0;i<s.length();i++)
    {
        if((s[i]>='a')&&(s[i]<='z'))
            s[i]-=dif;
    }
   return s;
}
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