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I found this code in Python, which prints "Hello World" without the use of the string "Hello World". It's a one line code, a single expression (i.e. no print statement).

(lambda _, __, ___, ____, _____, ______, _______, ________: getattr(__import__(True.__class__.__name__[_] + [].__class__.__name__[__]), ().__class__.__eq__.__class__.__name__[:__] + ().__iter__().__class__.__name__[_____:________])(_, (lambda _, __, ___: _(_, __, ___))(lambda _, __, ___: chr(___ % __) + _(_, __, ___ // __) if ___ else (lambda: _).func_code.co_lnotab, _ << ________, (((_____ << ____) + _) << ((___ << _____) - ___)) + (((((___ << __) - _) << ___) + _) << ((_____ << ____) + (_ << _))) + (((_______ << __) - _) << (((((_ << ___) + _)) << ___) + (_ << _))) + (((_______ << ___) + _) << ((_ << ______) + _)) + (((_______ << ____) - _) << ((_______ << ___))) + (((_ << ____) - _) << ((((___ << __) + _) << __) - _)) - (_______ << ((((___ << __) - _) << __) + _)) + (_______ << (((((_ << ___) + _)) << __))) - ((((((_ << ___) + _)) << __) + _) << ((((___ << __) + _) << _))) + (((_______ << __) - _) << (((((_ << ___) + _)) << _))) + (((___ << ___) + _) << ((_____ << _))) + (_____ << ______) + (_ << ___))))(*(lambda _, __, ___: _(_, __, ___))((lambda _, __, ___: [__(___[(lambda: _).func_code.co_nlocals])] + _(_, __, ___[(lambda _: _).func_code.co_nlocals:]) if ___ else []), lambda _: _.func_code.co_argcount, (lambda _: _, lambda _, __: _, lambda _, __, ___: _, lambda _, __, ___, ____: _, lambda _, __, ___, ____, _____: _, lambda _, __, ___, ____, _____, ______: _, lambda _, __, ___, ____, _____, ______, _______: _, lambda _, __, ___, ____, _____, ______, _______, ________: _)))

As it is a single line code, Here's a well formatted code which is more readable.

It is made up of only functions, attribute access, lists, tuples, basic math, one True, and one star-args. It has minimal builtin usage (__import__, getattr, and chr once each).

It's really hard for me to understand it. Is there any possible explanation of what it does?

Here, by the way, is where the author of the code explains how it works.

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  • 3
    See here the explanation.
    – doru
    Jul 14 '15 at 7:34
  • 2
    Why have you not cited the source of the code?
    – user1812457
    Jul 14 '15 at 8:09
  • 1
    That's "run away screaming"-tier Python code. Jul 14 '15 at 8:14
  • 4
    Seriously, dude: the question and answer on Stackoverflow; the link to the author's webpage with further info. It is called "citing your sources" and you should do it
    – user1812457
    Jul 14 '15 at 8:15
  • 1
    That said, this is a very bad question with no value. You could have had a specific problem, and asked about a detail; as it stands, it is just knowingly posting someone else's code without citing.
    – user1812457
    Jul 14 '15 at 8:17
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The answer to the question as written: The code avoids a print statement by os.write()ing to stdout's file descriptor, which is 1:

getattr(__import__("os"), "write")(1, "Hello world!\n")

The rest of the explanation is detailed at https://benkurtovic.com/2014/06/01/obfuscating-hello-world.html. Instead of a summary here, just read the original!

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