On Flickr I just found the explore section that is very fascinating: https://www.flickr.com/explore

enter image description here

It's a very nice solution to display pictures with different sizes and if you resize the browser window all rows will adapt to fit the layout.

[EDIT] How would you build something like that without using masonry library as suggested in the answer below? I worked a little bit on some javascript pseudo code, and I think that the logic should be all in. What do you think about it? How could be translated in a working library?

var rowWidhtPx=document.getElementById('gridContainer').offsetWidth;; 
var maxRowHeightPX= 300;
var minRowHeightPX= 200;

var imageArray=[
    {
        src:'somesrc',
        width:200,
        height:300,
    },
    ...
    ,{
        src:'somesrc',
        width:200,
        height:300,
    }
];
var rowMatrix;
var rowsIndex=0;
rowMatrix[rowsIndex].setHeight(maxRowHeightPX);
imageArray.forEach(function (img,index){
    img.scaleHeight(maxRowHeightPX);

    if(rowMatrix[rowsIndex].actualWidth+img.widht<=rowWidhtPx){
        rowMatrix[rowsIndex].push(img);//set margin gutter to prev image
    }else{
        rowMatrix[rowsIndex].scaleHeight(minRowHeightPX) ;//scale also image heights
        if(rowMatrix[rowsIndex].actualWidth+img.scaleHeight(minRowHeightPX)<=rowWidhtPx ){
            rowMatrix[rowsIndex].push(img);
        }else{
            rowMatrix[rowsIndex].setOptimalHeight();
            //starting from minimum height, take total widht and set it to rowWidthPX, and scale the height accordingly 
            //then takes single images and set also the height              
            rowsIndex++; // add new row
        }
    }
}); 

closed as off-topic by web-tiki, dippas, Paulie_D, easwee, Moritz Jul 14 '15 at 16:50

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  • Flickr are using javascript to manipulate the link sizes which have background images. So basically, it's not a grid system at all AFAICT. – Paulie_D Jul 14 '15 at 11:40
  • Yes, ok, is not a grid as we can tell thinking to html+css responsive grid systems, but the layout result is still a grid :) – MQ87 Jul 14 '15 at 11:43
  • Regardless, requests of this nature are off-topic for SO – Paulie_D Jul 14 '15 at 11:47

We call it masonary grids .... You can check it here.

Masonary gallery Library .... You can use it to create gallery like that.

  • I can't find anything on the documentation to make it work with rows of images as flickr does – MQ87 Jul 14 '15 at 11:26
  • I believe you need to get the idea of what is Masonary is ? and Why masonary is needed here . There is bunch of works yahoo team put behind these work . The link I gave you will help you to get going with few base ideas . But to create that much awesome stuff , You will be needed to put some extra work on it . – Mahabub Islam Prio Jul 14 '15 at 18:58

While you can use custom CSS styling to create a grid like this, it's much faster and easier to use a responsive CSS framework like Bootstrap or Foundation.

With Bootstrap for example, creating responsive grid layouts is very easy. Assume that you we want a page like Flickr, on that page the first row should have 4 images, second should have 2 and third should have 6 images. When the screen size gets smaller, the images need to stack and scale accordingly. With Bootstrap we can do this like:

<div class="container">
  <div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-4 col-md-3">
      <image src="..." alt="...">
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-4 col-md-3">
      <image src="..." alt="...">
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-4 col-md-3">
      <image src="..." alt="...">
    </div>
  </div>
  <div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-6">
      <image src="..." alt="...">
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-6">
      <image src="..." alt="...">
    </div>
  </div>
  <div class="row">
    <div class="col-xs-4 col-md-2">
      <image src="..." alt="...">
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-4 col-md-2">
      <image src="..." alt="...">
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-4 col-md-2">
      <image src="..." alt="...">
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-4 col-md-2">
      <image src="..." alt="...">
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-4 col-md-2">
      <image src="..." alt="...">
    </div>
    <div class="col-xs-4 col-md-2">
      <image src="..." alt="...">
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

Where .row is a image row and .col-*-* classes are appropriate columns. You can learn more about Bootstrap here: http://getbootstrap.com/

Hope that answers your question.

  • It's not a simple grid: the number of columns change depending from the images that can fit the row. – MQ87 Jul 14 '15 at 11:29

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