13

I'm working with LINQ to objects and have a function where in some cases I need to modify the underlying collection before calling Aggregate(...) and then return it to its original state before the funciton returns the results of Aggregate(...). My current code looks something like this:

bool collectionModified = false;
if(collectionNeedsModification)
{
    modifyCollection();
    collectionModified = true;
}

var aggregationResult = from a in
                            (from b in collection
                             where b.SatisfysCondition)
                             .Aggregate(aggregationFunction)
                        select a.NeededValue;

if(collectionModified)
    modifyCollection();

return aggregationResult;

However, as written, if I modify the collection, I will get the wrong result because I'm putting the collection back in its original state before aggregationResult is enumerated and LINQ results are lazy-evaluated. My current solution is to use .ToArray() on my LINQ query like this:

var aggregationResult = (from a in
                            (from b in collection
                             where b.SatisfysCondition)
                             .Aggregate(aggregationFunction)
                         select a.NeededValue).ToArray();

The size of the resulting array will always be small (< 100 items) so memory / processing time is not a concern. Is this the best way to handle my problem, or is there a better way to force the evaluation of a LINQ query?

15

Just to check I understand you - you basically want to iterate through all of the results, just to force any side effects to take place?

Side effects are generally a bad idea precisely because things are harder to understand with this kind of logic. Having said that, the easiest way to do it and force full evaluation is probably to just iterate through it:

foreach (var result in aggregationResult)
{
    // Deliberately empty; simply forcing evaluation of the sequence.
}

Alternatively you could use LastOrDefault() to avoid all the copying involved in ToArray(). Count() will be okay so long as the result doesn't implement IList<T> (which involves a short-cut).

  • 2
    I prefer .LastOrDefault(). Note that LastOrDefault also takes a short-cut (in my version, .NET 4.5.2). If the source is an IList<>, it will first get Count, and then use the indexer to get the element with index Count - 1. For example this works (uses Moq): var listMock = new Mock<IList<string>>(MockBehavior.Strict); listMock.Setup(x => x.Count).Returns(666); listMock.Setup(x => x[665]).Returns("last one"); var last = listMock.Object.LastOrDefault(); – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 5 '14 at 12:31
13

(Note: typing without a compiler at hand, so the code is untested)

If you have Reactive Extensions for .NET as a dependency already you can use Run():

aggregationResult.Run();

But it might not be worth adding a dependency for this.

You can also implement the Run method yourself as an extension method:

public static MyLinqExtensions 
{
     public static void Run<T>(this IEnumerable<T> e)
     {
         foreach (var _ in e);
     }
}
  • This may be good when enumerator may be alive(as in RX) or good as answer for question. But not for general use when we need to ensure collection is not lazy, I think LastOrDefault - which takes short cut - is better. – Dzmitry Lahoda Sep 1 '16 at 10:11
3

It is better to avoid side effect functions like the modifyCollection above.

A better approach is to make a function that returns the modified collection (or query), letting the initial one intact.

var modifiedCollection = ModifyCollection(collection, collectionNeedsModification);

var aggregationResult = from a in
                        (from b in modifiedCollection
                         where b.SatisfysCondition)
                         .Aggregate(aggregationFunction)
                    select a.NeededValue;

Where ModifyCollection is a method that returns the modified collection (or query) in the parameter depending on collectionNeedsModification boolean parameter.

0

I don't think there is a problem with your approach if you'll always use the result (since your result set is not large, it'll not consume much memory. By the way, if you do this and never use the result, it'll impose a performance loss). So, yes, this is the correct way to do it.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.