0

So I have a function that does a replacement looking something like this:

PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property = PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property.Replace("DeeperSkyBlue", "0066CC");
PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property = PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property.Replace("DeepSkyBlue", "3366FF");
PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property = PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property.Replace("SkyBlue", "99CCFF");
PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property = PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property.Replace("Yellow", "FFFF00");
PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property = PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property.Replace("DarkTurquoise", "0066CC");
PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property = PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property.Replace("Salmom", "FF8080");
PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property = PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property.Replace("LightBlue", "3366FF");
PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property = PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property.Replace("LightPurple", "CC99FF");
PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property = PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property.Replace("DarkBlue", "000080");
PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property = PowerPointEventArg.powerPointDataList[index].property.Replace("DarkOrange", "FF9900");

In the code, I see this "Replacement" performed 9 times, and the only thing different about the 9 is the "property".

I would like to know if there is a way to dynamically change the property, so I only write the replacement code once, but change the 9 different properties?

2

Create variables to make the code shorter and copy/paste the assignment:

var eai = EventArgs.InterfaceInsideEventArg[index];
var eaz = EventArgs.InterfaceInsideEventArg[z];

eai.PropertyInsideInterface = eaz.PropertyInsideInterface.Replace("DeeperSkyBlue", "0066CC");
eai.{prop2} = eaz.{prop2}.Replace("DeeperSkyBlue", "0066CC");
//etc.

You could use reflection by getting each property by name, looping, and doing the assignment, but:

  • It won't be any less code
  • It will take you longer to write than copy/paste
  • You'll have to thoroughly test
  • It will be harder to debug
  • You lose type safety
  • If any property names (or types) change you won't know that your code is broken until run-time.
0

Ugly as sin, but you could use a function and 2 delegates (assuming your variable properties are all string)

public void DoIt(Action<string> set, Func<string> get)
{
    set(get());
}

usage

var e = EventArgs.InterfaceInsideEventArg[index];

DoIt(s => e.PropertyInsideInterface = s, 
    () => e.PropertyInsideInterface.Replace("DeeperSkyBlue", "0066CC"));

DoIt(s => e.SomeOtherProperty = s, 
     () => e.SomeOtherProperty.Replace("DeeperSkyBlue", "0066CC"));

Lets enumerate the pros/cons along the same vane as @DStanley

  • It's marginally less code
  • It is harder to instantly see what is going on
  • Not much testing required, the code is essentially the same as the original
  • Marginally harder to debug than the original
  • Maintains type safety
  • Code is checked at compile-time.

So on the whole, marginally better than the original, but for the sake of bevity I would probably stick with the original copy/pasted 4 times.

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