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I have been tasked with converting a C# cryptography method to Java and am stuck. I know the C# codes works, but I am having trouble getting my Java code to work.

Here is the C# code:

private const int Nb = 4; // Legal values:  4 = 128-bit blocks

public static void Decrypt(byte[] input, Stream output)
    { 
        var s1 = new MemoryStream(input);
        const int BufferSize = 1024;
        byte[] buffer = new byte[BufferSize];

        input.Read(buffer, 0, 4);
        int pad = buffer[3];

        RijndaelManaged rijndael = new RijndaelManaged();
        rijndael.BlockSize = Nb * 32;
        rijndael.KeySize = buffer[1] * 32;

        rijndael.Mode = CipherMode.ECB;
        rijndael.Padding = PaddingMode.None;

        byte[] key = GetKey(buffer[1]);
        ICryptoTransform decryptor = rijndael.CreateDecryptor(key, GetIV());

        int bytes;
        while ((bytes = input.Read(buffer, 0, BufferSize)) > 0)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < bytes; i += rijndael.BlockSize)
            {
                decryptor.TransformBlock(buffer, i, rijndael.BlockSize, buffer, i);
            }
            output.Write(buffer, 0, bytes);
        }
        output.SetLength(output.Length - pad - 4);
    }

And here is my attempt in Java so far:

public static String decrypt(byte[] input) throws Exception {
    Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/ECB/NoPadding");
    byte[] key = getKey(input[1]);
    SecretKey secretKey = new SecretKeySpec(key, 0, key.length, "AES/ECB/NoPadding");
    cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, secretKey, new IvParameterSpec(getIV()));
    // remove first 4 since C# code reads past those
    byte[] finalDecoded = Arrays.copyOfRange(input, 4, input.length);
    byte[] decryptedVal = cipher.doFinal(finalDecoded);
    return new String(decryptedVal);
}

Some More Information

  • For GetIV and GetKey, I can guarantee that the results in java are the same (I have compared every byte), but I am not including those methods because I believe that is sensitive information. I can also guarantee that the input byte[] is identical and (redundantly) the same length.

  • Debugging attempts: The current error in Java is ECB mode cannot use IV.

    • When I remove this code : new IvParameterSpec(getIV()) I get this error: Wrong algorithm: AES or Rijndael required
    • If I change the algorithm to only AES or only Rijndael I get this error: Input length must be multiple of 16 when decrypting with padded cipher. The input length starting is 424 and 420 after reading past/removing the first 4 bytes. I have verified that the input bytes are the same for Java and C#.

Where am I going wrong in the Java code?

6

You are getting the error ECB mode cannot use IV because ECB doesn't perform chaining, so IV is meaningless. The difference is Java throws an error whereas C# just ignores the IV.

When I remove this code : new IvParameterSpec(getIV()) I get this error: Wrong algorithm:AES or Rijndaelrequired

If I change the algorithm to only AES or only Rijndael I get this error: Input length must be multiple of 16 when decrypting withpadded cipher.

You had the right idea, but you went too far. This error is only to do with the SecretKeySpec, which doesn't care about the mode, but just the algorithm. Cipher is where you specify mode. Also, Rijndael and AES aren't quite the same thing.

So start by changing the first few lines to this:

Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("Rijndael/ECB/NoPadding");
byte[] key = getKey(input[1]);
SecretKey secretKey = new SecretKeySpec(key, 0, key.length, "Rijndael");
cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, secretKey);

Note that since you're using the entire key you don't need the offset and length arguments, so you can just do

SecretKey secretKey = new SecretKeySpec(key, "Rijndael");

The original C# code has some not-so-obvious behavior:

while ((bytes = input.Read(buffer, 0, BufferSize)) > 0)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < bytes; i += rijndael.BlockSize)
    {
        decryptor.TransformBlock(buffer, i, rijndael.BlockSize, buffer, i);
    }
    output.Write(buffer, 0, bytes);
}

When the loop gets to the end of the input, it will copy however much is left of it into buffer. Unless the last Read was exactly 1024 bytes, there will be residue from the previous loop (or from initialization if it gets the whole input with one Read operation) after the end of the input.

The inner loop decrypts one 16-byte block at a time. In the case of your 420-byte example, the last block will consist of the remaining 4 bytes of input and 12 more bytes of garbage. But it's okay because the output.Write only writes bytes number of bytes to truncate the garbage. You will have to replicate this behavior in your Java code.


Side note: do you absolutely have to use ECB? It's not very secure...

  • Thank you so much. When I applied your changes, I got this error Input length not multiple of 16 bytes. Which is similar to the other error I was getting except it doesn't say anything about padding. – jlars62 Jul 14 '15 at 18:41
  • I tried removing the last 4 bytes of the input array (as well as the first 4) since the last 4 are padding to make the length a multiple of 16 and it pretty much worked, there are just some weird characters at the end of the decrypted string... – jlars62 Jul 14 '15 at 18:47
  • @jlars62 I edited my answer – Sabre Jul 14 '15 at 18:55
  • I forgot to mention, you also do not truncate the final result like the original C# does (output.SetLength(output.Length - pad - 4);) so that could affect your results too. – Sabre Jul 14 '15 at 18:57
  • Yeah, I that not so obvious behavior was the last piece. Once I got converted that to Java it worked! Thanks again!! – jlars62 Jul 14 '15 at 19:02

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