30

I need to get the names of all the Excel files in a folder and then make changes to each file. I've gotten the "make changes" part sorted out. Is there a way to get a list of the .xlsx files in one folder, say D:\Personal and store it in a String Array.

I then need to iterate through the list of files and run a macro on each of the files which I figured I can do using:

Filepath = "D:\Personal\"
For Each i in FileArray
    Workbooks.Open(Filepath+i)
Next

I had a look at this, however, I wasn't able to open the files cause it stored the names in Variant format.

In short, how can I use VBA to get a list of Excel filenames in a specific folder?

4
  • Do you need the files listed in another place? Or do you just want to do stuff in the files without listing them? Jul 14, 2015 at 18:16
  • Just want to do stuff in the files Jul 14, 2015 at 18:18
  • That's the opposite of what your question reads. You want the names of the files, not to just do stuff to the files. Jul 14, 2015 at 18:21
  • @Raystafarian Yeah, but if I get the names of the files, I can just open them using Workbooks.Open() so I just need to get the list of names in a String Array. Jul 14, 2015 at 18:23

6 Answers 6

52

Ok well this might work for you, a function that takes a path and returns an array of file names in the folder. You could use an if statement to get just the excel files when looping through the array.

Function listfiles(ByVal sPath As String)

    Dim vaArray     As Variant
    Dim i           As Integer
    Dim oFile       As Object
    Dim oFSO        As Object
    Dim oFolder     As Object
    Dim oFiles      As Object

    Set oFSO = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    Set oFolder = oFSO.GetFolder(sPath)
    Set oFiles = oFolder.Files

    If oFiles.Count = 0 Then Exit Function

    ReDim vaArray(1 To oFiles.Count)
    i = 1
    For Each oFile In oFiles
        vaArray(i) = oFile.Name
        i = i + 1
    Next

    listfiles = vaArray

End Function

It would be nice if we could just access the files in the files object by index number but that seems to be broken in VBA for whatever reason (bug?).

4
  • This works! Only issue is it's a Variant Array and I need them as a string but the typecast isn't working properly. I need to open each of them after that. Jul 15, 2015 at 15:49
  • Its a string contained in a variant, it shouldn't be a problem to use where ever you might use a string. Are you sure its not something else causing your error? can you post up offending code? Also I don't use arrays for lists of filenames to open later, I use a collection of files, that might work for you too.
    – Coder375
    Jul 15, 2015 at 16:07
  • I found my problem. I was iterating through the files using For Each i in oFiles Workbook.Open(oFiles(i)) Just had to change that to i. My bad! Thanks for the help! Jul 15, 2015 at 16:28
  • I can read and think I understand what the code above is doing for the most part, how would one modify the code above so that it would also grab the filenames from sub folders?
    – Forward Ed
    Nov 15, 2019 at 19:19
38

You can use the built-in Dir function or the FileSystemObject.

They each have their own strengths and weaknesses.

Dir Function

The Dir Function is a built-in, lightweight method to get a list of files. The benefits for using it are:

  • Easy to Use
  • Good performance (it's fast)
  • Wildcard support

The trick is to understand the difference between calling it with or without a parameter. Here is a very simple example to demonstrate:

Public Sub ListFilesDir(ByVal sPath As String, Optional ByVal sFilter As String)

    Dim sFile As String

    If Right(sPath, 1) <> "\" Then
        sPath = sPath & "\"
    End If

    If sFilter = "" Then
        sFilter = "*.*"
    End If

    'call with path "initializes" the dir function and returns the first file name
    sFile = Dir(sPath & sFilter)

   'call it again until there are no more files
    Do Until sFile = ""

        Debug.Print sFile

        'subsequent calls without param return next file name
        sFile = Dir

    Loop

End Sub

If you alter any of the files inside the loop, you will get unpredictable results. It is better to read all the names into an array of strings before doing any operations on the files. Here is an example which builds on the previous one. This is a Function that returns a String Array:

Public Function GetFilesDir(ByVal sPath As String, _
    Optional ByVal sFilter As String) As String()

    'dynamic array for names
    Dim aFileNames() As String
    ReDim aFileNames(0)

    Dim sFile As String
    Dim nCounter As Long

    If Right(sPath, 1) <> "\" Then
        sPath = sPath & "\"
    End If

    If sFilter = "" Then
        sFilter = "*.*"
    End If

    'call with path "initializes" the dir function and returns the first file
    sFile = Dir(sPath & sFilter)

    'call it until there is no filename returned
    Do While sFile <> ""

        'store the file name in the array
        aFileNames(nCounter) = sFile

        'subsequent calls without param return next file
        sFile = Dir

        'make sure your array is large enough for another
        nCounter = nCounter + 1
        If nCounter > UBound(aFileNames) Then
            'preserve the values and grow by reasonable amount for performance
            ReDim Preserve aFileNames(UBound(aFileNames) + 255)
        End If

    Loop

    'truncate the array to correct size
    If nCounter < UBound(aFileNames) Then
        ReDim Preserve aFileNames(0 To nCounter - 1)
    End If

    'return the array of file names
    GetFilesDir = aFileNames()

End Function

File System Object

The File System Object is a library for IO operations which supports an object-model for manipulating files. Pros for this approach:

  • Intellisense
  • Robust object-model

You can add a reference to to "Windows Script Host Object Model" (or "Windows Scripting Runtime") and declare your objects like so:

Public Sub ListFilesFSO(ByVal sPath As String)

    Dim oFSO As FileSystemObject
    Dim oFolder As Folder
    Dim oFile As File

    Set oFSO = New FileSystemObject
    Set oFolder = oFSO.GetFolder(sPath)
    For Each oFile In oFolder.Files
        Debug.Print oFile.Name
    Next 'oFile

    Set oFile = Nothing
    Set oFolder = Nothing
    Set oFSO = Nothing

End Sub

If you don't want intellisense you can do like so without setting a reference:

Public Sub ListFilesFSO(ByVal sPath As String)

    Dim oFSO As Object
    Dim oFolder As Object
    Dim oFile As Object

    Set oFSO = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    Set oFolder = oFSO.GetFolder(sPath)
    For Each oFile In oFolder.Files
        Debug.Print oFile.Name
    Next 'oFile

    Set oFile = Nothing
    Set oFolder = Nothing
    Set oFSO = Nothing

End Sub
6
  • I'm still getting them in Variant format and I'm getting all the files and not just the Excel files. Jul 14, 2015 at 18:29
  • Write an if statement that tests the file names... If LCase(Right(sPath,5)) = ".xlsx" Then or you might want to look at the File.Type property.
    – Don Jewett
    Jul 14, 2015 at 18:35
  • Declare your variables as the correct type and they won't be variants.
    – Don Jewett
    Jul 14, 2015 at 18:38
  • +1 for the Dir version. One thing to consider though - the Dir reads next file when invoked. If you perform any task on a currently selected filed it might reorder files and as a result not open another file even when you expect it to do so. To avoid that read a list of files into String array and then do all the operations using that list.
    – Ister
    Aug 1, 2018 at 12:12
  • 2
    It's worth knowing that the Dir method is much faster than the FSO method. After amending both methods to write to a String array (since Debug.Print is itself quite slow) I found that for a folder containing approx 3,000 files the Dir method executed in 0.009 seconds and the FSO method in 13 seconds, a factor of 1,400! May 12, 2019 at 16:11
8
Dim iIndex as Integer
Dim ws As Excel.Worksheet
Dim wb      As Workbook
Dim strPath As String
Dim strFile As String

strPath = "D:\Personal\"
strFile = Dir(strPath & "*.xlsx")

Do While strFile <> ""
    Set wb = Workbooks.Open(Filename:=strPath & strFile)

    For iIndex = 1 To wb.Worksheets.count
        Set ws = wb.Worksheets(iIndex)

        'Do something here.

    Next iIndex

 strFile = Dir 'This moves the value of strFile to the next file.
Loop
4
2

If all you want is the file name without file extension

Dim fileNamesCol As New Collection
Dim MyFile As Variant  'Strings and primitive data types aren't allowed with collection

filePath = "c:\file directory" + "\"
MyFile = Dir$(filePath & "*.xlsx")
Do While MyFile <> ""
    fileNamesCol.Add (Replace(MyFile, ".xlsx", ""))
    MyFile = Dir$
Loop

To output to excel worksheet

Dim myWs As Worksheet: Set myWs = Sheets("SheetNameToDisplayTo")
Dim ic As Integer: ic = 1

For Each MyFile In fileNamesCol
    myWs.Range("A" & ic).Value = fileNamesCol(ic)
    ic = ic + 1
Next MyFile

Primarily based on the technique detailed here: https://wordmvp.com/FAQs/MacrosVBA/ReadFilesIntoArray.htm

0

Regarding the upvoted answer, I liked it except that if the resulting "listfiles" array is used in an array formula {CSE}, the list values come out all in a horizontal row. To make them come out in a vertical column, I simply made the array two dimensional as follows:

ReDim vaArray(1 To oFiles.Count, 0)
i = 1
For Each oFile In oFiles
    vaArray(i, 0) = oFile.Name
    i = i + 1
Next
0
Sub test()
    Dim FSO As Object
    Set FSO = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    Set folder1 = FSO.GetFolder(FromPath).Files
    FolderPath_1 = "D:\Arun\Macro Files\UK Marco\External Sales Tool for Au\Example Files\"
    Workbooks.Add
    Set Movenamelist = ActiveWorkbook
    For Each fil In folder1
        Movenamelist.Activate
        Range("A100000").End(xlUp).Offset(1, 0).Value = fil
        ActiveCell.Offset(1, 0).Select
    Next
End Sub
0

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