26

Simple and fast question, i have those tables:

//table people
| pe_id | pe_name |
| 1  | Foo  |
| 2  | Bar  |
//orders table
| ord_id | pe_id | ord_title   |
|   1    |   1   | First order |
|   2    |   2   | Order two   |
|   3    |   2   | Third order |
//items table
| item_id | ord_id | pe_id | title  |
|   1     |   1    |   1   | Apple  |
|   2     |   1    |   1   | Pear   |
|   3     |   2    |   2   | Apple  |
|   4     |   3    |   2   | Orange |
|   5     |   3    |   2   | Coke   |
|   6     |   3    |   2   | Cake   |

I need to have a query listing all the people, counting the number of orders and the total number of items, like that:

| pe_name | num_orders | num_items |
| Foo  |    1       |   2       |
| Bar  |    2       |   4       |

But i can not make it work! I tried

SELECT
    people.pe_name,
    COUNT(orders.ord_id) AS num_orders,
    COUNT(items.item_id) AS num_items
FROM
    people
    INNER JOIN orders ON (orders.pe_id = people.pe_id)
    INNER JOIN items ON items.pe_id = people.pe_id
GROUP BY
    people.pe_id;

But this returns the num_* values incorrect:

| name | num_orders | num_items |
| Foo  |    2       |   2       |
| Bar  |    8       |   8       |

I noticed that if i try to join one table at time, it works:

SELECT
    people.pe_name,
    COUNT(orders.ord_id) AS num_orders
FROM
    people
    INNER JOIN orders ON (orders.pe_id = people.pe_id)
GROUP BY
    people.pe_id;

//give me:
| pe_name | num_orders |
| Foo     |          1 |
| Bar     |          2 |

//and:
SELECT
    people.pe_name,
    COUNT(items.item_id) AS num_items
FROM
    people
    INNER JOIN items ON (items.pe_id = people.pe_id)
GROUP BY
    people.pe_id;
//output:
| pe_name | num_items |
| Foo     |         2 |
| Bar     |         4 |

How to combine those two queries in one?

5
  • 1
    Your tables really need to be reorganized. The item table shouldn't reference the order table and certainly not the person table, and you need a new table for a many-to-many relationship like orders and items.
    – Adam Crume
    Jun 29, 2010 at 14:20
  • Why would he need a many-to-many if an order can only belong to one person. His model makes perfect sense.
    – Tom H
    Jun 29, 2010 at 14:42
  • @adam: i dont understand your suggestion. Then only useless id that i see is the pe_id into the items table, but maybe could be usefull in future to get the total items of a people without joining the orders table. What do you mean with " The item table shouldn't reference the order"?
    – Strae
    Jun 29, 2010 at 19:21
  • The many-to-many relationship isn't between orders and people, it's between orders and items. By "the item table shouldn't reference the order," I mean that the items table should not have an ord_id column. After all, multiple people could place multiple orders for the same item, right? I'm assuming something like Amazon.com here, where 1000 people could order copies of the same DVD.
    – Adam Crume
    Jun 29, 2010 at 20:52
  • @Adam: yes youre right, different order can have same items, but this structure is just an example, the items in the order may differ for some details (discount, notes, etc..) so actually i have the items table and an orders_items table (that is the items table in the example). Thanks for the tips, i'll give a try to your way maybe has some performance improvement
    – Strae
    Jun 30, 2010 at 6:20

6 Answers 6

37

It makes more sense to join the item with the orders than with the people !

SELECT
    people.pe_name,
    COUNT(distinct orders.ord_id) AS num_orders,
    COUNT(items.item_id) AS num_items
FROM
    people
    INNER JOIN orders ON orders.pe_id = people.pe_id
         INNER JOIN items ON items.ord_id = orders.ord_id
GROUP BY
    people.pe_id;

Joining the items with the people provokes a lot of doublons. For example, the cake items in order 3 will be linked with the order 2 via the join between the people, and you don't want this to happen !!

So :

1- You need a good understanding of your schema. Items are link to orders, and not to people.

2- You need to count distinct orders for one person, else you will count as many items as orders.

4
  • It makes more sense, but with the current schema, it won't make a difference.
    – Adam Crume
    Jun 29, 2010 at 14:18
  • "Items are link to orders, and not to people".. agree, but the pe_id on the items table let me, for example, retrieve all the items for 1 people without joining the orders table.. can be usefull, maybe, and if not, i can easly remove the index in the final optimization step ;)
    – Strae
    Jun 29, 2010 at 19:24
  • don't remove the pe_id of the items table, it could be a good shortcut for some query. BUT for this particular one, it is just not useful! Jun 30, 2010 at 6:47
  • proposed code does not work if to use "GROUP BY people.pe_id;". When I replaced it with 'pe_name" it works. May 5, 2021 at 10:40
6

As Frank pointed out, you need to use DISTINCT. Also, since you are using composite primary keys (which is perfectly fine, BTW) you need to make sure that you use the whole key in your joins:

SELECT
    P.pe_name,
    COUNT(DISTINCT O.ord_id) AS num_orders,
    COUNT(I.item_id) AS num_items
FROM
    People P
INNER JOIN Orders O ON
    O.pe_id = P.pe_id
INNER JOIN Items I ON
    I.ord_id = O.ord_id AND
    I.pe_id = O.pe_id
GROUP BY
    P.pe_name

Without I.ord_id = O.ord_id it was joining each item row to every order row for a person.

3

i tried putting distinct on both, count(distinct ord.ord_id) as num_order, count(distinct items.item_id) as num items

its working :)

    SELECT
         people.pe_name,
         COUNT(distinct orders.ord_id) AS num_orders,
         COUNT(distinct items.item_id) AS num_items
    FROM
         people
         INNER JOIN orders ON (orders.pe_id = people.pe_id)
         INNER JOIN items ON items.pe_id = people.pe_id
    GROUP BY
         people.pe_id;

Thanks for the Thread it helps :)

2
select pe_name,count( distinct b.ord_id),count(c.item_id) 
 from people  a, order1 as b ,item as c
 where a.pe_id=b.pe_id and
b.ord_id=c.order_id   group by a.pe_id,pe_name
0
1

Your solution is nearly correct. You could add DISTINCT:

SELECT
    people.pe_name,
    COUNT(distinct orders.ord_id) AS num_orders,
    COUNT(items.item_id) AS num_items
FROM
    people
    INNER JOIN orders ON (orders.pe_id = people.pe_id)
    INNER JOIN items ON items.pe_id = people.pe_id
GROUP BY
    people.pe_id;
2
  • Doesn't give the good results. | name | num_orders | num_items | | Foo | 1 | 2 | | Bar | 2 | 8 | Jun 29, 2010 at 14:29
  • Yes, this give the rong items count, you should add the distinct clause in the count(items) too and then works
    – Strae
    Jun 30, 2010 at 6:54
0

One needs to understand what a JOIN or a series of JOINs does to a set of data. With strae's post, a pe_id of 1 joined with corresponding order and items on pe_id = 1 will give you the following data to "select" from:

[ table people portion ] [ table orders portion ] [ table items portion ]

| people.pe_id | people.pe_name | orders.ord_id | orders.pe_id | orders.ord_title | item.item_id | item.ord_id | item.pe_id | item.title |

| 1 | Foo | 1 | 1 | First order | 1 | 1 | 1 | Apple |
| 1 | Foo | 1 | 1 | First order | 2 | 1 | 1 | Pear |

The joins essentially come up with a cartesian product of all the tables. You basically have that data set to select from and that's why you need a distinct count on orders.ord_id and items.item_id. Otherwise both counts will result in 2 - because you effectively have 2 rows to select from.

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