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Why does JavaScript evaluate plus with a string and integers differently depending on the place of the string?

An example:

console.log("1" + 2 + 3);
console.log(2 + 5 + "8");

The first line prints 123 and the second prints 78.

5
  • 1
    the first converts the whole thing to string. the second starts adding up the numbers until it sees the string, when it will then convert the whole thing to string. Jul 15 '15 at 7:26
  • 1
    Because in javascript + is both the addition and concatenation operand, and which one is applied depends on the first value. Jul 15 '15 at 7:26
  • Because string+string is still a string. Adding a string to an int type-safely is impossible, so it coerces the second operand to be the same type as the first.
    – doldt
    Jul 15 '15 at 7:26
  • 1
    here is problems about javascript wiki.theory.org/YourLanguageSucks
    – tanaydin
    Jul 15 '15 at 7:28
  • 1
    I'm just going to leave this here: xkcd.com/1537
    – Luke
    Jul 15 '15 at 11:27
21
  1. JavaScript does automatic type conversion
  2. The expression is evaluated left to right and therefore:

    "1" + 2 + 3 -> "12" + 3 -> "123"
    
    2 + 5 + "8" -> 7 + "8" -> "78"
    
7

JavaScript's type conversion in the cases you mention infers that you're looking to convert the types of all of your arguments to match the type of your first argument to the + operator.

This is why in the first case you mention that starts with the string "1" the addition converts the other arguments to strings.

In the second case you mentioned console.log(2 + 5 + "8"). The first argument to the + operator is an integer which is why JavaScript's type conversion assumes you want an integer.

2

Well, that's because the + operator is overloaded.

  • When used with two integers, it sums them up.
  • When used with two strings, it concatenates them.
  • When used between a string and an integer, it concatenates them.

That's why, when you do

console.log("1" + 2 + 3);

It concatenates the first and second operand (since the first one is a string) to give a string, "12", and it again concatenates it with the third operand for the same reason.

However, when you do

console.log(2 + 5 + "8");

It sums the first and second operands (both being numeric) to give 7 and finally concatenates it with the third operand for reasons mentioned above.

0

The expression evaluates from left to right.

So if you use "1" + 2 + 3 and the types of operands are different, it will append, otherwise if the types are ints it will add.

case "1" + 2 + 3
"1" +2 - different types- result - "12" string
"12" + 3 - different types- result - "123" string
 case 2 + 5 + "8"
2 + 5 - same types- result - 7 int
7 + "8" - different types - result "78" string
0

I think it's called duck casting. If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck it must be a duck. If it looks like a string "1" then it's probably a string.

JavaScript also seems to evaluate both from left to right and from specific(int) to general (string).

In your first example, console.log("1" + 2 + 3), it's evaluating the "1" as a string because of the quotes and assuming you want to concatenate everything following it. It writes "123" as the result.

In the second example, console.log(2 + 5 + "8"), it takes an int and adds to another int producing 7, then encounters a string, so it assumes you want to do a concatenation so it writes "78" as a string. If you wanted to evaluate strictly int values, you could use parseInt("8") to convert your 8 back into an int.

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