82

does anyone have a good regex pattern for matching iso datetimes?

ie: 2010-06-15T00:00:00

1
  • 2
    i use /^(\d{4})-0?(\d+)-0?(\d+)[T ]0?(\d+):0?(\d+):0?(\d+)$/, (which however is not the most strict one) .. conversion to the Date is a different story :)
    – mykhal
    Jun 29, 2010 at 17:29

10 Answers 10

137

For the strict, full datetime, including milliseconds, per the W3C's take on the spec.:

//-- Complete precision:
/\d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d:[0-5]\d\.\d+([+-][0-2]\d:[0-5]\d|Z)/

//-- No milliseconds:
/\d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d:[0-5]\d([+-][0-2]\d:[0-5]\d|Z)/

//-- No Seconds:
/\d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d([+-][0-2]\d:[0-5]\d|Z)/

//-- Putting it all together:
/(\d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d:[0-5]\d\.\d+([+-][0-2]\d:[0-5]\d|Z))|(\d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d:[0-5]\d([+-][0-2]\d:[0-5]\d|Z))|(\d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d([+-][0-2]\d:[0-5]\d|Z))/

.
Additional variations allowed by the actual ISO 8601:2004(E) doc:

/********************************************
**    No time-zone varients:
*/
//-- Complete precision:
/\d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d:[0-5]\d\.\d+/

//-- No milliseconds:
/\d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d:[0-5]\d/

//-- No Seconds:
/\d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d/

//-- Putting it all together:
/(\d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d:[0-5]\d\.\d+)|(\d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d:[0-5]\d)|(\d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d)/

WARNING: This all gets messy fast, and it still allows certain nonsense such as a 14th month. Additionally, ISO 8601:2004(E) allows a several other variants.

.
"2010-06-15T00:00:00" isn't legal, because it doesn't have the time-zone designation.

13
  • 2
    ISO-8601 says that if the timezone is omitted it's assumed to be UTC, this includes the 'Z'. Jun 29, 2010 at 23:07
  • 1
    I wholeheartedly agree that Wikipedia is not a definitive source. But for some topics it makes a reasonable reference, and the article on ISO-8601 has palatable examples and digestible explanations. :-D Jun 30, 2010 at 16:43
  • 4
    Wow. This answer is referenced in the angular source code! @BrockAdams Mar 6, 2015 at 16:15
  • 2
    Thanks for the regex. To tweak it a bit, we can use (?: ) instead of ( ) to avoid capturing a group. e.g. \d{4}-[01]\d-[0-3]\dT[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d:[0-5]\d\.\d+(?:[+-][0-2]\d:[0-5]\d|Z) for the first regex.
    – Thanish
    Feb 2, 2016 at 5:58
  • 4
    This will fail for leap seconds, i.e, that occasional 61st second.
    – mcfedr
    Apr 22, 2016 at 7:45
17

For matching just ISO date, like 2017-09-22, you can use this regexp:

^\d{4}-([0]\d|1[0-2])-([0-2]\d|3[01])$

It will match any numeric year, any month specified by two digits in range 00-12 and any date specified by two digits in range 00-31

1
  • 4
    How is 00 valid for either month or day?
    – Yigit Erol
    Oct 30, 2020 at 16:57
10

I reworked the top answer into something a bit more concise. Instead of writing out each of the three optional patterns, the elements are nested as optional statements.

/[+-]?\d{4}(-[01]\d(-[0-3]\d(T[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d:?([0-5]\d(\.\d+)?)?[+-][0-2]\d:[0-5]\dZ?)?)?)?/

I'm curious if there are downsides to this approach?

You can find tests for my suggested answer here: http://regexr.com/3e0lh

3
  • 1
    This won't work with: 2016-09-05T15:22:26.286Z Making [+-][0-2]\d:[0-5]\d optional makes it work: [+-]?\d{4}(-[01]\d(-[0-3]\d(T[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d:?([0-5]\d(\.\d+)?)?([+-][0-2]\d:[0-5]\d)?Z?)?)?)?
    – Frank
    Sep 5, 2016 at 15:31
  • this allows strange things to be valid as: 28T09:5220.5690463826472487295963210360122513980205942+01:53 try this in Chrome console to check it: /[+-]?\d{4}(-[01]\d(-[0-3]\d(T[0-2]\d:[0-5]\d:?([0-5]\d(\.\d+)?)?[+-][0-2]\d:[0-5]\dZ?)?)?)?/.test("28T09:5220.5690463826472487295963210360122513980205942+01:53");
    – ferpel
    Nov 15, 2019 at 13:22
  • This caused my auth token to be caught because it had a matching part matched by the section \d{4}. Mar 27, 2021 at 22:56
6

Here is a regular expression to check ISO 8601 date format including leap years and short-long months. To run this, you'll need to "ignore white-space". A compacted version without white-space is on regexlib: http://regexlib.com/REDetails.aspx?regexp_id=3344

There's more to ISO 8601 - this regex only cares for dates, but you can easily extend it to support time validation which is not that tricky.

Update: This works now with javascript (without lookbehinds)

  ^(?:
      (?=
            [02468][048]00
            |[13579][26]00
            |[0-9][0-9]0[48]
            |[0-9][0-9][2468][048]
            |[0-9][0-9][13579][26]              
      )

      \d{4}

      (?:

        (-|)

        (?:

            (?:
                00[1-9]
                |0[1-9][0-9]
                |[1-2][0-9][0-9]
                |3[0-5][0-9]
                |36[0-6]
            )
            |
                (?:01|03|05|07|08|10|12)
                (?:
                  \1
                  (?:0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])
                )?            
            |
                (?:04|06|09|11)
                (?:
                  \1
                  (?:0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|30)
                )?            
            |
                02
                (?:
                  \1
                  (?:0[1-9]|[12][0-9])
                )?

            |
                W(?:0[1-9]|[1-4][0-9]|5[0-3])
                (?:
                  \1
                  [1-7]
                )?

        )            
      )?
  )$
  |
  ^(?:
      (?!
            [02468][048]00
            |[13579][26]00
            |[0-9][0-9]0[48]
            |[0-9][0-9][2468][048]
            |[0-9][0-9][13579][26]              
      )

      \d{4}

      (?:

        (-|)

        (?:

            (?:
                00[1-9]
                |0[1-9][0-9]
                |[1-2][0-9][0-9]
                |3[0-5][0-9]
                |36[0-5]
            )
            |
                (?:01|03|05|07|08|10|12)
                (?:
                  \2
                  (?:0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])
                )?

            |
                (?:04|06|09|11)
                (?:
                  \2
                  (?:0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|30)
                )?
            |
                (?:02)
                (?:
                  \2
                  (?:0[1-9]|1[0-9]|2[0-8])
                )?
            |
                W(?:0[1-9]|[1-4][0-9]|5[0-3])
                (?:
                  \2
                  [1-7]
                )?
       ) 
    )?
)$

To cater for time, add something like this to the mixture (from: http://underground.infovark.com/2008/07/22/iso-date-validation-regex/ ):

([T\s](([01]\d|2[0-3])((:?)[0-5]\d)?|24\:?00)?(\15([0-5]\d))?([zZ]|([\+-])([01]\d|2[0-3]):?([0-5]\d)?)?)?
0
6

I have made this regex and solves the validation for dates as they come out of Javascript's .toISOString() method.

^[0-9]{4}-((0[13578]|1[02])-(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])|(0[469]|11)-(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|30)|(02)-(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]))T(0[0-9]|1[0-9]|2[0-3]):(0[0-9]|[1-5][0-9]):(0[0-9]|[1-5][0-9])\.[0-9]{3}Z$

Contemplated:

  • Proper symbols ('-', 'T', ':', '.', 'Z') in proper places.
  • Consistency with months of 29, 30 or 31 days.
  • Hours from 00 to 23.
  • Minutes and seconds from 00 to 59.
  • Milliseconds from 000 to 999.

Not contemplated:

  • Leap years.

Example date: 2019-11-15T13:34:22.178Z

Example to run directly in Chrome console: /^[0-9]{4}-((0[13578]|1[02])-(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])|(0[469]|11)-(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|30)|(02)-(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]))T(0[0-9]|1[0-9]|2[0-3]):(0[0-9]|[1-5][0-9]):(0[0-9]|[1-5][0-9])\.[0-9]{3}Z$/.test("2019-11-15T13:34:22.178Z");

Regex flow diagram (Regexper): regex flow diagram

4
  • Why a such complex regex if it doesn't validate leap years? neither leap second.
    – Toto
    Nov 15, 2019 at 15:03
  • @Toto Because is the best between the ones posted previously. It respects each item I have pointed in the "contemplates" section. Try the regex in this answer and the other posted previously using this site, and you will see what I'm talking about. (I have also commented the problems in each of the other regex posted showing why them have flaws)
    – ferpel
    Nov 15, 2019 at 15:09
  • Sorry but it's not better because it doesn't handle leap years.
    – Toto
    Nov 15, 2019 at 15:27
  • It is better because the others does not make what they promise. Please, try the other regex from this different answers with the page I have suggested in the previous comment and you will see what I am trying to explain.
    – ferpel
    Nov 15, 2019 at 16:59
3

The ISO 8601 specification allows a wide variety of date formats. There's a mediocre explanation as to how to do it here. There is a fairly minor discrepancy between how Javascript's date input formatting and the ISO formatting for simple dates which do not specify timezones, and it can be easily mitigated using a string substitution. Fully supporting the ISO-8601 specification is non-trivial.

Here is a reference example which I do not guarantee to be complete, although it parses the non-duration dates from the aforementioned Wikipedia page.

Below is an example, and you can also see it's output on ideone. Unfortunately, it does not work to specification as it does not properly implement weeks. The definition of the week number 01 in ISO-8601 is non-trivial and requires some browsing the calendar to determine where week one begins, and what exactly it means in terms of the number of days in the specified year. This can probably be fairly easily corrected (I'm just tired of playing with it).

function parseISODate (input) {
    var iso = /^(\d{4})(?:-?W(\d+)(?:-?(\d+)D?)?|(?:-(\d+))?-(\d+))(?:[T ](\d+):(\d+)(?::(\d+)(?:\.(\d+))?)?)?(?:Z(-?\d*))?$/;

    var parts = input.match(iso);

    if (parts == null) {
        throw new Error("Invalid Date");
    }

    var year = Number(parts[1]);

    if (typeof parts[2] != "undefined") {
        /* Convert weeks to days, months 0 */
        var weeks = Number(parts[2]) - 1;
        var days  = Number(parts[3]);

        if (typeof days == "undefined") {
            days = 0;
        }

        days += weeks * 7;

        var months = 0;
    }
    else {
        if (typeof parts[4] != "undefined") {
            var months = Number(parts[4]) - 1;
        }
        else {
            /* it's an ordinal date... */
            var months = 0;
        }

        var days   = Number(parts[5]);
    }

    if (typeof parts[6] != "undefined" &&
        typeof parts[7] != "undefined")
    {
        var hours        = Number(parts[6]);
        var minutes      = Number(parts[7]);

        if (typeof parts[8] != "undefined") {
            var seconds      = Number(parts[8]);

            if (typeof parts[9] != "undefined") {
                var fractional   = Number(parts[9]);
                var milliseconds = fractional / 100;
            }
            else {
                var milliseconds = 0
            }
        }
        else {
            var seconds      = 0;
            var milliseconds = 0;
        }
    }
    else {
        var hours        = 0;
        var minutes      = 0;
        var seconds      = 0;
        var fractional   = 0;
        var milliseconds = 0;
    }

    if (typeof parts[10] != "undefined") {
        /* Timezone adjustment, offset the minutes appropriately */
        var localzone = -(new Date().getTimezoneOffset());
        var timezone  = parts[10] * 60;

        minutes = Number(minutes) + (timezone - localzone);
    }

    return new Date(year, months, days, hours, minutes, seconds, milliseconds);
}

print(parseISODate("2010-06-29T15:33:00Z-7"))
print(parseISODate("2010-06-29 06:14Z"))
print(parseISODate("2010-06-29T06:14Z"))
print(parseISODate("2010-06-29T06:14:30.2034Z"))
print(parseISODate("2010-W26-2"))
print(parseISODate("2010-180"))
3

yyyy-MM-dd

Too much explanation for most of the answers here, here's a short variation of @Sergey answer addressing some weird scenarios (like 2020-00-00), this RegExp only cares about the yyyy-MM-dd date:

// yyyy-MM-dd
^\d{4}-([0][1-9]|1[0-2])-([0-2][1-9]|[1-3]0|3[01])$

Also this one doesn't care about the number of days per month, like 2020-11-31 (because November has only 30 days).

My use-case was to convert a String into a Date (from an API param) and I needed only to know that the input string didn't contained strange stuff, I do the next validation against an actual Date object.

1

Not sure if it's relevant to the underlying problem you are trying to solve, but you can pass an ISO date string as a constructor arg to Date() and get an object out of it. The constructor is actually very flexible in terms of coercing a string into a Date.

1
  • 1
    Confirmed, that approach doesn't work. The problem is with IE. 2014-06-44 becomes 2014-08-13 as IE treats the overflowing date (>30) as a date the next month. I've tried in IE8 and IE11. Works in Chrome though. Very annoying.
    – mortb
    Mar 20, 2015 at 15:41
1

with 02/29 validation from the year 1900 to 2999

 (((2000|2400|2800|((19|2[0-9])(0[48]|[2468][048]|[13579][26])))-02-29)|(((19|2[0-9])[0-9]{2})-02-(0[1-9]|1[0-9]|2[0-8]))|(((19|2[0-9])[0-9]{2})-(0[13578]|10|12)-(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01]))|(((19|2[0-9])[0-9]{2})-(0[469]|11)-(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|30)))T([01][0-9]|[2][0-3]):[0-5][0-9]:[0-5][0-9]\.[0-9]{3}Z
1
  • 1
    this regex allows invalid dates as: 19-02-29T20:59:39.217Z where the year doesn't respect ISO format yyyy you can try this in Chrome console to check it: /(((2000|2400|2800|(19|2[0-9](0[48]|[2468][048]|[13579][26])))-02-29)|(((19|2[0-9])[0-9]{2})-02-(0[1-9]|1[0-9]|2[0-8]))|(((19|2[0-9])[0-9]{2})-(0[13578]|10|12)-(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01]))|(((19|2[0-9])[0-9]{2})-(0[469]|11)-(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|30)))T([01][0-9]|[2][0-3]):[0-5][0-9]:[0-5][0-9]\.[0-9]{3}Z/.test("19-02-29T20:59:39.217Z");
    – ferpel
    Nov 15, 2019 at 13:02
0

Brocks answers are good, but should start with ^ and end with $ so as not to allow prefix/suffix characters if all you are trying to match is the date string alone.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.