Have a bit of confusion regarding designated and convenience initializers for UIViewController in Swift 2.0/Xcode 7beta3. Our UIViewControllers are all defined in code, there are no Nibs

Currently class A inherits from UIViewController like this

class A : UIViewController {
    convenience init() {
        ...
        self.init(nibName:nil, bundle:nil)
        ...
    }    
}

Then class B inherits from class A and should override the convenience init and call its as super.init()

class B : A {
    convenience init() {
        super.init()
        ...
    }    
}

The compiler does not allow this with Must call a designated initializer of the superclass '...' error on super.init()

  • So what's the problem? The error message is clear. super.init is not a designated initializer - you yourself declared it a convenience initializer. Why are you surprised? – matt Jul 15 '15 at 22:49
  • @matt - I am curious as to the best pattern to use here. I am defining a convenience init method to do a dependency injection on init() for the subclass of UIViewController. When I subclass the subclass, I want to be able to do the same dependency injection on init(), just modify some of the functionality. This was an easy pattern to implement in ObjC. I am asking what the best Swift pattern would be. All of the answers, yours included, throw compiler errors in Swift 2.0 and don't seem to apply to the UIKit frameworks (or at least not to UIViewController) – dmorrow Jul 16 '15 at 0:47
  • Mine doesn't throw any compiler error in Swift 2.0 / iOS 9. I tried it! – matt Jul 16 '15 at 1:00
up vote 11 down vote accepted

You need to make your initializers designated, not convenience:

class A : UIViewController {
    init() {
        super.init(nibName:nil, bundle:nil)
    }
    required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
        fatalError("")
    }
}

class B : A {
    override init() {
        super.init()
    }
    required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
        fatalError("")
    }
}

That gives you the inheritance structure you're looking for.

  • 4
    You might want to read my book, which explains the rules for class initializers (though really you hardly need to - all you have to do is listen to what the compiler tells you): apeth.com/swiftBook/ch04.html#_class_initializers – matt Jul 15 '15 at 22:53
  • The compiler doesn't let me make init a designated initializer. It forces me to add convenience with the error Designated initializer for '...' cannot delegate (with 'self.init'); did you mean this to be a convenience initializer? If I add required it doesn't help to force it to be a designated init, its just required to be overridden by the subclass – dmorrow Jul 16 '15 at 1:00
  • You didn't copy and paste what I actually wrote. What I wrote works. – matt Jul 16 '15 at 1:01
  • Do you need me to paste in a screen shot showing that my code compiles??? I'm happy to do it, but wouldn't it be better if you copied my code and pasted it into your own app and proved it for yourself? – matt Jul 16 '15 at 1:05
  • You are correct - I missed the super.init(nibName:nil... in A.init(). My apologies. I don't try to copy and paste code, I try to understand it and apply it to my own use case. Thank you for your help – dmorrow Jul 16 '15 at 1:06

Take a look at these images found in the documentation.

According to the image convenience initializers are not inherited. So if you want to inherit you must make it a designated initializer.

class A : UIViewController {
    init() {
        super.init(nibName: nil, bundle: nil)
    }
    required init(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
        super.init(coder: aDecoder)
    }
}

class B : A {
     override init() {
        super.init()
    }
    required init(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
        super.init(coder: aDecoder)
    }
}

At this Point you may wonder what the heck is the difference between a designated and convenience initializer? Well, Convenience is used to call a designated initializer in the same class and you are suppose to use this to do some set up.

  • This triggers two errors Initializer does not override a designated initializer from its super class on the init and Must call a designated initializer of the superclass '...' on super.init() – dmorrow Jul 15 '15 at 22:39
  • I updated my answer. It has no errors. – DerrickHo328 Jul 15 '15 at 23:01
  • I see you changed self.init(nibName:... to super.init(nibName:... as @matt's answer below shows. However, he had the correct answer before you updated your answer, so I'm marking his as answered. I've removed my down vote, as your answer is now correct as well – dmorrow Jul 16 '15 at 1:08

According to the document

Rule 2 A convenience initializer must call another initializer from the same class.

From https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Swift/Conceptual/Swift_Programming_Language/Initialization.html(Initializer Delegation for Class Types)

You should call it's own initializer instead:

    class B : A {
       convenience init() {
         init()
         ...
       }    
    }

And init() is automatically inherit from it's superclass version

Here are rules how communicating designated initializers and convenience initializers rule 1: A designated initializer must call a designated initializer from its immediate superclass.

Rule 2: A convenience initializer must call another initializer from the same class.

Rule 3: A convenience initializer must ultimately call a designated initializer.

A simple way to remember this is:

Designated initializers must always delegate up. Convenience initializers must always delegate across.

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