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Which function definition is more efficient in Python, even though they do the same task? I.e when should we use a for loop and when should we use a while loop?

def count_to_first_vowel(s):
    '''  (str) -> str
    Return the substring of s up to but not including the first vowel in s. If no vowel
    is present, return s.
    >>> count_to_first_vowel('hello')
    'h'
    >>> count_to_first_vowel('cherry')
    'ch'
    >>> count_to_first_vowel('xyz')
    xyz
    '''
    substring = ''
    for char in s:
        if char in 'aeiouAEIOU':
            return substring
        substring = substring + char
    return substring

or

def count_to_first_vowel(s):
    '''  (str) -> str
    Return the substring of s up to but not     including the first vowel in s. If no vowel
    is present, return s.
    >>> count_to_first_vowel('hello')
    'h'
    >>> count_to_first_vowel('cherry')
    'ch'
    >>> count_to_first_vowel('xyz')
    xyz
    '''
    substring = ''
    i = 0
    while i < len(s) and not s[i] in 'aeiouAEIOU':
        substring = substring + s
        i = i + 1
    return substring
  • Oh the code display got messed up :( how do I fix that for future reference? – Jeffrey Y. Jul 15 '15 at 22:03
  • Check out stackoverflow.com/help/formatting – Dan Getz Jul 15 '15 at 22:05
  • I gave you an edit that you can accept. StackOverflow uses Markdown syntax. If you put -three- four spaces at the beginning of a line, it is counted as a part of a code block. You can also use the editor for this. – Daymon Schroeder Jul 15 '15 at 22:05
  • 4
    "Which function definition is more efficient in Python" - why not test them (e.g. with timeit) and find out? You can also look at the bytecode they compile to with dis. But this seems like pointless micro-optimisation. And, FYI, SO is not a forum. – jonrsharpe Jul 15 '15 at 22:07
  • @DaymonSchroeder four spaces, right? – Dan Getz Jul 15 '15 at 22:08
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The for loop evaluates the length once, and operates knowing that. The while loop will have to evaluate len(s) each loop. There may be more overhead in accessing the individual index of the string each time the while statement gets evaluated too.

If the while loop is recalculating something like len() each time, I think it would be more efficient to use for. Both of them have to test at least one condition each loop though.

Rewriting the while loop to use a save variable like len = len(s) may remove that extra bit and make them extremely close. This is more true when you consider that your for loop is executing a second internal loop.

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