6

I have read a similar question: Magic sprintf function - how to wrap it?, but my requirement is a little bit different, so I am wondering whether it's doable or not.

First, I want to explain the scenario a little bit, I currently have a trace function like

let Trace traceLevel ( fs : unit -> string) =
    if traceLevel <= Config.TraceLevel then
        Trace.WriteLine <| fs()

So the function "fs" is called to generate a string only if traceLevel is less than or equal to the trace level specified by the Config.TraceLevel. So when traceLevel is greater than the Config.TraceLevel, it's a no op. "fs" is not evaluated at all.

Although not limited to, but in practice, almost all use cases look like

Trace 4 (fun _ -> sprintf "%s : %i"  "abc" 1)

It's pretty tedious to always write the "fun _ -> sprintf" part. Ideally, it would be nice to provide a flavor that user can just write

Trace 4 "%s : %i" "abc" 1

and it could

  • get the format/parameter check that sprintf offers.
  • have the same performance behavior as the original trace function that takes the lambda "fs". It means the if the check for trace level returns false, it's essentially an no-op. No extra cost is paid (e.g. string formatting, etc)

I cannot figure how to achieve this even after reading the answers to the original SO question.

It seems that kprintf allows a continuation function to be invoked against the formatted string. The wrapper still returns a function returned by one of the printf functions (which can then be a function taking one or more arguments). So currying can be in play. However, in the case above, what needed is to evaluate a condition before formatting the string, then apply the formatted string to Trace.WriteLine. It seems that the existing Printf module has an API to allow the injection of a pre-condition evaluation. So it seems not easily doable by wrapping the existing APIs.

Any idea on how to achieve this? (I read FSharp.Core/printf.fs very briefly, it seems possible to do it by providing a new derived PrintfEnv. However, these are internal types).

Updates

Thanks for the answers from Tomas and Lincoln. I think both approaches take some performance hit. I did some simple measurement on my machine with fsi.

Option 1: my original approach, on the "false" path, "fs()" is not evaluated at all. The usage is not so nice, since one needs to write the "fun _ -> sprintf" part.

let trace1 lvl (fs : unit -> string) =
    if lvl <= 3 then Console.WriteLine(fs())

Option 2: format the string but throw it away on the "false" path

let trace2 lvl fmt = 
    Printf.kprintf (fun s -> if lvl <= 3 then Console.WriteLine(s)) fmt

Option 3: through recursion, reflection and box

let rec dummyFunc (funcTy : Type) retVal =
    if FSharpType.IsFunction(funcTy) then
        let retTy = funcTy.GenericTypeArguments.[1]
        FSharpValue.MakeFunction(funcTy, (fun _ -> dummyFunc retTy retVal))
    else box retVal

let trace3 lvl (fmt : Printf.StringFormat<'t, unit>) =
    if lvl <= 3 then Printf.kprintf (fun s -> Console.WriteLine(s)) fmt
    else downcast (dummyFunc typeof<'t> ())

Now I timed all three with code like

for i in 1..1000000 do
    trace1 4 (fun _ -> sprintf "%s:%i" (i.ToString()) i)

for i in 1..1000000 do
    trace2 4 "%s:%i" (i.ToString()) i

for i in 1..1000000 do
    trace3 4 "%s:%i" (i.ToString()) i

Here is what I get:

trace1: 
  Real: 00:00:00.009, CPU: 00:00:00.015, GC gen0: 2, gen1: 1, gen2: 0
trace2:
  Real: 00:00:00.709, CPU: 00:00:00.703, GC gen0: 54, gen1: 1, gen2: 0
trace3:
  Real: 00:00:50.918, CPU: 00:00:50.906, GC gen0: 431, gen1: 5, gen2: 0

So both option 2 and 3 takes a significant perf hit compared to option 1 (especially option 3). This gap would grow if the string format is more complicated. For example, if I change the format and parameters to

"%s: %i %i %i %i %i" (i.ToString()) i (i * 2) (i * 3) (i * 4) (i * 5)

I get

trace1: 
  Real: 00:00:00.007, CPU: 00:00:00.015, GC gen0: 3, gen1: 1, gen2: 0
trace2:
  Real: 00:00:01.912, CPU: 00:00:01.921, GC gen0: 136, gen1: 0, gen2: 0
trace3:
  Real: 00:02:10.683, CPU: 00:02:10.671, GC gen0: 1074, gen1: 14, gen2: 1

So far, there seems still no satisfying solution to get both usability and perf.

  • FYI; you can significantly improve latkins suggestion by adding some memoization (ie caching). – Just another metaprogrammer Jul 21 '15 at 13:42
2

The trick is to use the kprintf function:

let trace level fmt = 
  Printf.kprintf (fun s -> if level > 3 then printfn "%s" s) fmt

trace 3 "Number %d" 10
trace 4 "Better number %d" 42

You can use it via partial application, so that all parameters required by the format string of kprintf will become parameters of the function you are defining.

The function then calls a continuation with the final string, and so you can decide what to do with it.

  • If I understand correctly, the string is still formatted before "(fun s -> if level > 3 then printfn "%s" s)" is invoked. The goal is to not format the string if the condition is false. Also I need to supply the result of sprintf to Trace.WriteLine. – Lost In Translation Jul 15 '15 at 23:38
  • Sorry, I missed that part of your question. Are you worried about the performance? – Tomas Petricek Jul 15 '15 at 23:54
  • Correct. We want to write the code using various verbose level of tracing. The "Config.TraceLevel" controls the level of tracing at runtime. The goal is that the more verbose traces won't incur overhead if the condition is false. – Lost In Translation Jul 16 '15 at 0:10
1

Here's a way to do it, however the "no-op" case needs to use reflection and boxing so it's probably much slower than simply formatting the string and throwing it away :-)

open System
open Microsoft.FSharp.Reflection

let rec dummyFunc (funcTy : Type) retVal =
    if FSharpType.IsFunction(funcTy) then
        let retTy = funcTy.GenericTypeArguments.[1]
        FSharpValue.MakeFunction(funcTy, (fun _ -> dummyFunc retTy retVal))
    else box retVal

let trace lvl (fmt : Printf.StringFormat<'t, unit>) =
    if lvl <= 3 then Printf.kprintf (fun s -> Console.WriteLine(s)) fmt
    else downcast (dummyFunc typeof<'t> ())


trace 3 "%s : %i" "abc" 1 // abc : 1
trace 4 "%s : %i" "abc" 1 // <nothing>
  • Thanks Lincoln. Fascinating approach! I really scratched my head to barely understand the code, :). However, as you said, it's really runtime expensive. I did some rough perf test and posted the result to the "Update" section under my question. – Lost In Translation Jul 16 '15 at 17:49
1

Looking at your requirements, it seems to me that the most important thing is not avoiding the tracing/logging per se, but avoiding the work that goes into formatting the string to be traced.

So for example, using System.Diagnostics.Trace instead of printf would not help you, because it is the sprintf that is taking the time, yes?.

So, there are a couple of ways to delay the formatting. One is to use a unit function, as you are doing originally. Alternatively, you can use lazy as an equivalent.

open System

let traceUnitFn lvl (fs : unit -> string) =
    if lvl <= 3 then Console.WriteLine(fs())

let traceLazy lvl (s:Lazy<string>) =
    if lvl <= 3 then Console.WriteLine(s.Force())

Timing those (on my machine) gives the following:

printfn "traceUnitFn"
#time
for i in 1..1000000 do
    traceUnitFn  4 (fun _ -> sprintf "%s:%i" (i.ToString()) i)
#time

// traceUnitFn
// Real: 00:00:00.008, CPU: 00:00:00.000, GC gen0: 7, gen1: 0, gen2: 0

printfn "traceLazy"
#time
for i in 1..1000000 do
    traceLazy 4 <| lazy (sprintf "%s:%i" (string i) i)
#time

// traceLazy
// Real: 00:00:00.053, CPU: 00:00:00.046, GC gen0: 56, gen1: 0, gen2: 0

So, OK, using lazy is a lot slower.

But is sprintf really the bottleneck here? Let's try calling it directly.

First we'll need a separate function for each number of parameters:

let trace0Param level fmt  = 
    if level <= 3 then printfn fmt 

let trace1Param level fmt x1 = 
    if level <= 3 then printfn fmt x1

let trace2Param level fmt x1 x2 = 
    if level <= 3 then printfn fmt x1 x2 

If we test these then, we get:

printfn "trace0Param"
#time
for i in 1..1000000 do
    trace0Param 4 "hello"
#time

// trace0Param
// Real: 00:00:00.007, CPU: 00:00:00.000, GC gen0: 8, gen1: 0, gen2: 0

printfn "trace1Param"
#time
for i in 1..1000000 do
    trace1Param 4 "%i" i
#time

// trace1Param
// Real: 00:00:00.007, CPU: 00:00:00.000, GC gen0: 7, gen1: 0, gen2: 0

printfn "trace2Param with i.ToString"
#time
for i in 1..1000000 do
    trace2Param 4 "%s:%i" (i.ToString()) i
#time

// trace2Param with i.ToString
// Real: 00:00:00.123, CPU: 00:00:00.124, GC gen0: 25, gen1: 0, gen2: 0

The first two are just as fast as your original, so the problem is all in the i.ToString() call.

We can confirm this if we hard code the string parameter to be "hello" instead:

printfn "trace2Param with hello"
#time
for i in 1..1000000 do
    trace2Param 4 "%s:%i" "hello" i
#time

// trace2Param with hello
// Real: 00:00:00.007, CPU: 00:00:00.000, GC gen0: 7, gen1: 0, gen2: 0

This last one is just as fast. And notice how many fewer GC's as well. The GC's will hurt you if performance is critical.

So the question really becomes: how much work are you doing in transforming values in order to trace them? Are you going to be doing expensive things like i.ToString() a lot? If not, then you don't really need the laziness at all.

Finally, and much more importantly, all these micro-profiling measurements are absolutely useless out of context, and any decision based on them is premature.

For example, even the worst implementation is doing 8 million traces a second. Is that really a bottleneck based on profiling your real system? If not, then I wouldn't worry about any of this, and just pick the simplest implementation.

  • I totally agree with the last two paragraphs as the general principle. However, I failed to see how the experiments demonstrated "printf" is not the bottleneck (in the context of these microbenchmarks). None of your trace functions invokes "printf“ thus not surprisingly have similar performance as my "trace1" function, and if you add extra overhead like (ToString()) it stands out. However, if you compare the results with my "trace2" function, all your trace functions are significantly faster than it. It shows the impact of "printf" (of course, in the context of micro-benchmarking). – Lost In Translation Jul 19 '15 at 22:28
  • About "the most important thing is not avoiding the tracing/logging per se, but avoiding the work that goes into formatting the string to be traced.", I don't think it is true. Tracing/Logging itself is normally more expensive than formatting the string. In all the examples discussed in this thread, the tracing/logging part has been avoided. Avoiding string formatting is a further add-on. – Lost In Translation Jul 19 '15 at 22:30
  • F#'s printf is statically type checked, this is a fantastic feature. The purpose of this thread is trying to find out whether it is possible to take advantage of such type check in a specific scenario. String formatting incurs an overhead regardless how small it is. It's always nice to avoid it if it's easy to achieve. If it takes significant effort to avoid it, then yes, of course it needs to be justified. (On the other hand, if we don't care about the type check, it's not difficult to avoid the string formatting. C# does not have the format type check anyway.) – Lost In Translation Jul 19 '15 at 23:06
  • All good points! Rereading it now, this is not the greatest answer -- I wrote it late at night! – Grundoon Jul 20 '15 at 10:26
1

Building on @latkin suggestion one can add memoization to improve performance somewhat.

module Trace4 =
  let cache = 
    let d = ConcurrentDictionary<Type, obj> ()
    d.[typeof<unit>] <- box ()
    d

  let rec buildFunction (ftype : Type) : obj =
    let retTy   = ftype.GenericTypeArguments.[1]
    let retVal  = getFunction retTy
    FSharpValue.MakeFunction(ftype, (fun _ -> retVal))

  and getFunction (ftype : Type) : obj =
    cache.GetOrAdd (ftype, buildFunction)

let trace4 lvl (fmt : Printf.StringFormat<'T, unit>) =
    if lvl <= 3 then Printf.kprintf (fun s -> Console.WriteLine(s)) fmt
    else downcast Trace4.getFunction typeof<'T>

It seems to me that i.ToString() is adding some significant overhead. Even though one would extend Core.PrintF to avoid unnecessary formatting that price would still be paid.

Personally I am all for having zero-overhead for non-enabled traces. Where I work we have a lot of traces. The cost of those adds up rather quickly and if we didn't have zero-overhead for non-enabled traces it would affect our metrics negatively.

  • thanks very much for sharing the idea! Personally, I'm also in for zero-overhead for non-enabled traces. I agree that stuff like i.ToString() or some even more costly log-only computation can add overhead. In such cases, trace1 can be used. – Lost In Translation Jul 22 '15 at 17:26
  • Unfortunately even trace1 isn't zero-overhead as depending on the situation it creates a function object which needs to be GC:ed but I guess it's a reasonable mix of convencience and performance. – Just another metaprogrammer Jul 23 '15 at 10:57
  • I tried generating the function values using Reflection.Emit as well but the miniscule performance benefit gained doesn't motivate dark magic. – Just another metaprogrammer Jul 23 '15 at 10:59

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