27

I'd like to be able to highlight the drop area as soon as the cursor carrying a file enters the browser window, exactly the way Gmail does it. But I can't make it work, and I feel like I'm just missing something really obvious.

I keep trying to do something like this:

this.body = $('body').get(0)
this.body.addEventListener("dragenter", this.dragenter, true)
this.body.addEventListener("dragleave", this.dragleave, true)`

But that fires the events whenever the cursor moves over and out of elements other than BODY, which makes sense, but absolutely doesn't work. I could place an element on top of everything, covering the entire window and detect on that, but that'd be a horrible way to go about it.

What am I missing?

3
  • 6
    In addition to the answers below: I noticed that at least under chrome the sequence of events is: ENTER ENTER LEAVE ENTER LEAVE ... LEAVE which means if you keep count of enters and leaves you will be able to differentiate between the initial enter and the internal enter/leave sequences PS: Sorry for the fed up formatting... Commented Jul 4, 2011 at 12:50
  • You're the man @MartinWawrusch! Thanks for this Commented Feb 14, 2017 at 21:08
  • @MartinWawrusch Almost perfect. The last leave doesn't fire if a 'drop' happens inside the page itself. So, for completeness, ENTER [ENTER LEAVE]* [LEAVE|DROP] is the correct sequence. The events should be registered on the window using capturing (setting the third parameter to true) instead of being on the html/document/body elements so that none of the events are missed if someone else calls e.stopPropagation() on something deeper in the tree. Commented May 13, 2020 at 13:10

14 Answers 14

25

I solved it with a timeout (not squeaky-clean, but works):

var dropTarget = $('.dropTarget'),
    html = $('html'),
    showDrag = false,
    timeout = -1;

html.bind('dragenter', function () {
    dropTarget.addClass('dragging');
    showDrag = true; 
});
html.bind('dragover', function(){
    showDrag = true; 
});
html.bind('dragleave', function (e) {
    showDrag = false; 
    clearTimeout( timeout );
    timeout = setTimeout( function(){
        if( !showDrag ){ dropTarget.removeClass('dragging'); }
    }, 200 );
});

My example uses jQuery, but it's not necessary. Here's a summary of what's going on:

  • Set a flag (showDrag) to true on dragenter and dragover of the html (or body) element.
  • On dragleave set the flag to false. Then set a brief timeout to check if the flag is still false.
  • Ideally, keep track of the timeout and clear it before setting the next one.

This way, each dragleave event gives the DOM enough time for a new dragover event to reset the flag. The real, final dragleave that we care about will see that the flag is still false.

2
  • I got the best results from combining this answer with Martin Wawrusch's comment on the question. The timer is reset every time any event is handled, and is canceled entirely when dragleaves equal dragenters. This gives me instant feedback in webkit browsers, and gives me feedback with a brief lag in firefox, which doesn't reliably call dragleave on its way out of the window.
    – Dave
    Commented Dec 5, 2013 at 1:07
  • In other words, you debounce the handler of the dragleave event. Smart workaround.
    – John Weisz
    Commented Nov 27, 2017 at 10:55
9

Modified version from Rehmat (thx)

I liked this idea and instead of writing a new answer, I am updating it here itself. It can be made more precise by checking window dimensions.


var body = document.querySelector("body");
body.ondragleave = (e) => {
  if (
    e.clientX >= 0 && e.clientX <= body.clientWidth
    && e.clientY >= 0 && e.clientY <= body.clientHeight
  ) {} else {
    // do something here
  }
}


Old Version

Don't know it this works for all cases but in my case it worked very well

$('body').bind("dragleave", function(e) {
   if (!e.originalEvent.clientX && !e.originalEvent.clientY) {
          //outside body / window
   }
});
3
  • 4
    This does not always succeed in detecting the end of a drag (EG: file dragged from outside the browser and dropped onto the 'downloads' bar in chrome does not send a dragleave with 0,0 as the clientX/Y
    – Jamie Pate
    Commented May 11, 2016 at 18:19
  • This works up, down and left. Right fails if there is a scrollbar.
    – red
    Commented Sep 7, 2018 at 7:35
  • Also fails dragging from a window that's over the browser window: clientX and clientY are within the body then
    – aredridel
    Commented Sep 8, 2022 at 18:56
8

Adding the events to document seemed to work? Tested with Chrome, Firefox, IE 10.

The first element that gets the event is <html>, which should be ok I think.

var dragCount = 0,
    dropzone = document.getElementById('dropzone');

function dragenterDragleave(e) {
  e.preventDefault();
  dragCount += (e.type === "dragenter" ? 1 : -1);
  if (dragCount === 1) {
    dropzone.classList.add('drag-highlight');
  } else if (dragCount === 0) {
    dropzone.classList.remove('drag-highlight');
  }
};

document.addEventListener("dragenter", dragenterDragleave);
document.addEventListener("dragleave", dragenterDragleave);
4

Here's another solution. I wrote it in React, but I'll explain it at the end if you want to rebuild it in plain JS. It's similar to other answers here, but perhaps slightly more refined.

import React from 'react';
import styled from '@emotion/styled';
import BodyEnd from "./BodyEnd";

const DropTarget = styled.div`
    position: fixed;
    top: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    pointer-events: none;
    background-color:rgba(0,0,0,.5);
`;

function addEventListener<K extends keyof DocumentEventMap>(type: K, listener: (this: Document, ev: DocumentEventMap[K]) => any, options?: boolean | AddEventListenerOptions) {
    document.addEventListener(type, listener, options);
    return () => document.removeEventListener(type, listener, options);
}

function setImmediate(callback: (...args: any[]) => void, ...args: any[]) {
    let cancelled = false;
    Promise.resolve().then(() => cancelled || callback(...args));
    return () => {
        cancelled = true;
    };
}

function noop(){}

function handleDragOver(ev: DragEvent) {
    ev.preventDefault();
    ev.dataTransfer!.dropEffect = 'copy';
}


export default class FileDrop extends React.Component {

    private listeners: Array<() => void> = [];

    state = {
        dragging: false,
    }

    componentDidMount(): void {
        let count = 0;
        let cancelImmediate = noop;

        this.listeners = [
            addEventListener('dragover',handleDragOver),
            addEventListener('dragenter',ev => {
                ev.preventDefault();

                if(count === 0) {
                    this.setState({dragging: true})
                }
                ++count;
            }),
            addEventListener('dragleave',ev => {
                ev.preventDefault();
                cancelImmediate = setImmediate(() => {
                    --count;
                    if(count === 0) {
                        this.setState({dragging: false})
                    }
                })

            }),
            addEventListener('drop',ev => {
                ev.preventDefault();
                cancelImmediate();
                if(count > 0) {
                    count = 0;
                    this.setState({dragging: false})
                }
            }),
        ]
    }

    componentWillUnmount(): void {
        this.listeners.forEach(f => f());
    }


    render() {
        return this.state.dragging ? <BodyEnd><DropTarget/></BodyEnd> : null;
    }
}

So, as others have observed, the dragleave event fires before the next dragenter fires, which means our counter will momentarily hit 0 as we drag files (or whatever) around the page. To prevent that, I've used setImmediate to push the event to the bottom of JavaScript's event queue.

setImmediate isn't well supported, so I wrote my own version which I like better anyway. I haven't seen anyone else implement it quite like this. I use Promise.resolve().then to move the callback to the next tick. This is faster than setImmediate(..., 0) and simpler than many of the other hacks I've seen.

Then the other "trick" I do is to clear/cancel the leave event callback when you drop a file just in case we had a callback pending -- this will prevent the counter from going into the negatives and messing everything up.

That's it. Seems to work very well in my initial testing. No delays, no flashing of my drop target.


Can get the file count too with ev.dataTransfer.items.length

1
3

@tyler's answer is the best! I have upvoted it. After spending so many hours I got that suggestion working exactly as intended.

$(document).on('dragstart dragenter dragover', function(event) {    
    // Only file drag-n-drops allowed, http://jsfiddle.net/guYWx/16/
    if ($.inArray('Files', event.originalEvent.dataTransfer.types) > -1) {
        // Needed to allow effectAllowed, dropEffect to take effect
        event.stopPropagation();
        // Needed to allow effectAllowed, dropEffect to take effect
        event.preventDefault();

        $('.dropzone').addClass('dropzone-hilight').show();     // Hilight the drop zone
        dropZoneVisible= true;

        // http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/dnd/basics/
        // http://api.jquery.com/category/events/event-object/
        event.originalEvent.dataTransfer.effectAllowed= 'none';
        event.originalEvent.dataTransfer.dropEffect= 'none';

         // .dropzone .message
        if($(event.target).hasClass('dropzone') || $(event.target).hasClass('message')) {
            event.originalEvent.dataTransfer.effectAllowed= 'copyMove';
            event.originalEvent.dataTransfer.dropEffect= 'move';
        } 
    }
}).on('drop dragleave dragend', function (event) {  
    dropZoneVisible= false;

    clearTimeout(dropZoneTimer);
    dropZoneTimer= setTimeout( function(){
        if( !dropZoneVisible ) {
            $('.dropzone').hide().removeClass('dropzone-hilight'); 
        }
    }, dropZoneHideDelay); // dropZoneHideDelay= 70, but anything above 50 is better
});
0
2

I see a lot of overengineered solutions out there. You should be able to achieve this by simply listening to dragenter and dragleave as your gut seemingly told you.

The tricky part is that when dragleave fires, it seems to have its toElement and fromElement inverted from what makes sense in everyday life (which kind of makes sense in logical terms since it's the inverted action of dragenter). Bottom-line when you move the cursor from the listening element to outside that element, toElement will have the listening element and fromElement will have the outer non-listening element. In our case, fromElement will be null when we drag outside the browser.

Solution

window.addEventListener("dragleave", function(e){
  if (!e.fromElement){
    console.log("Dragging back to OS")
  }
})

window.addEventListener("dragenter", function(e){
  console.log("Dragging to browser")
})
1

Your third argument to addEventListener is true, which makes the listener run during capture phase (see http://www.w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-3-Events/#event-flow for a visualization). This means that it will capture the events intended for its descendants - and for the body that means all elements on the page. In your handlers, you'll have to check if the element they're triggered for is the body itself. I'll give you my very dirty way of doing it. If anyone knows a simpler way that actually compares elements, I'd love to see it.

this.dragenter = function() {
    if ($('body').not(this).length != 0) return;
    ... functional code ...
}

This finds the body and removes this from the set of elements found. If the set isn't empty, this wasn't the body, so we don't like this and return. If this is body, the set will be empty and the code executes.

You can try with a simple if (this == $('body').get(0)), but that will probably fail miserably.

1

I was having trouble with this myself and came up with a usable solution, though I'm not crazy about having to use an overlay.

Add ondragover, ondragleave and ondrop to window

Add ondragenter, ondragleave and ondrop to an overlay and a target element

If drop occurs on the window or overlay, it is ignored, whereas the target handles the drop as desired. The reason we need an overlay is because ondragleave triggers every time an element is hovered, so the overlay prevents that from happening, while the drop zone is given a higher z-index so that the files can be dropped. I am using some code snippets found in other drag and drop related questions, so I cannot take full credit. Here's the full HTML:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Drag and Drop Test</title>
        <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="chrome=1" />
        <style>
        #overlay {
            display: none;
            left: 0;
            position: absolute;
            top: 0;
            z-index: 100;
        }
        #drop-zone {
            background-color: #e0e9f1;
            display: none;
            font-size: 2em;
            padding: 10px 0;
            position: relative;
            text-align: center;
            z-index: 150;
        }
        #drop-zone.hover {
            background-color: #b1c9dd;
        }
        output {
            bottom: 10px;
            left: 10px;
            position: absolute;
        }
        </style>
        <script>
            var windowInitialized = false;
            var overlayInitialized = false;
            var dropZoneInitialized = false;

            function handleFileSelect(e) {
                e.preventDefault();

                var files = e.dataTransfer.files;
                var output = [];

                for (var i = 0; i < files.length; i++) {
                    output.push('<li>',
                        '<strong>', escape(files[i].name), '</strong> (', files[i].type || 'n/a', ') - ',
                        files[i].size, ' bytes, last modified: ',
                        files[i].lastModifiedDate ? files[i].lastModifiedDate.toLocaleDateString() : 'n/a',
                        '</li>');
                }

                document.getElementById('list').innerHTML = '<ul>' + output.join('') + '</ul>';
            }

            window.onload = function () {
                var overlay = document.getElementById('overlay');
                var dropZone = document.getElementById('drop-zone');

                dropZone.ondragenter = function () {
                    dropZoneInitialized = true;
                    dropZone.className = 'hover';
                };
                dropZone.ondragleave = function () {
                    dropZoneInitialized = false;
                    dropZone.className = '';
                };
                dropZone.ondrop = function (e) {
                    handleFileSelect(e);
                    dropZoneInitialized = false;
                    dropZone.className = '';
                };

                overlay.style.width = (window.innerWidth || document.body.clientWidth) + 'px';
                overlay.style.height = (window.innerHeight || document.body.clientHeight) + 'px';
                overlay.ondragenter = function () {
                    if (overlayInitialized) {
                        return;
                    }

                    overlayInitialized = true;
                };
                overlay.ondragleave = function () {
                    if (!dropZoneInitialized) {
                        dropZone.style.display = 'none';
                    }
                    overlayInitialized = false;
                };
                overlay.ondrop = function (e) {
                    e.preventDefault();
                    dropZone.style.display = 'none';
                };

                window.ondragover = function (e) {
                    e.preventDefault();

                    if (windowInitialized) {
                        return;
                    }

                    windowInitialized = true;
                    overlay.style.display = 'block';
                    dropZone.style.display = 'block';
                };
                window.ondragleave = function () {
                    if (!overlayInitialized && !dropZoneInitialized) {
                        windowInitialized = false;
                        overlay.style.display = 'none';
                        dropZone.style.display = 'none';
                    }
                };
                window.ondrop = function (e) {
                    e.preventDefault();

                    windowInitialized = false;
                    overlayInitialized = false;
                    dropZoneInitialized = false;

                    overlay.style.display = 'none';
                    dropZone.style.display = 'none';
                };
            };
        </script>
    </head>

    <body>
        <div id="overlay"></div>
        <div id="drop-zone">Drop files here</div>
        <output id="list"><output>
    </body>
</html>
1

The ondragenter is fired quite often. You can avoid using a helper variable like draggedFile. If you don't care how often your on ondragenter function is being called, you can remove that helper variable.

Solution:

let draggedFile = false;

window.ondragenter = (e) => {
    if(!draggedFile) {
        draggedFile = true;
        console.log("dragenter");
    }
}

window.ondragleave = (e) => {
    if (!e.fromElement && draggedFile) {
        draggedFile = false;
        console.log("dragleave");
    }
}
0

Have you noticed that there is a delay before the dropzone disappears in Gmail? My guess is that they have it disappear on a timer (~500ms) that gets reset by dragover or some such event.

The core of the problem you described is that dragleave is triggered even when you drag into a child element. I'm trying to find a way to detect this, but I don't have an elegantly clean solution yet.

0

really sorry to post something that is angular & underscore specific, however the way i solved the problem (HTML5 spec, works on chrome) should be easy to observe.

.directive('documentDragAndDropTrigger', function(){
return{
  controller: function($scope, $document){

    $scope.drag_and_drop = {};

    function set_document_drag_state(state){
      $scope.$apply(function(){
        if(state){
          $document.context.body.classList.add("drag-over");
          $scope.drag_and_drop.external_dragging = true;
        }
        else{
          $document.context.body.classList.remove("drag-over");
          $scope.drag_and_drop.external_dragging = false;
        }
      });
    }

    var drag_enters = [];
    function reset_drag(){
      drag_enters = [];
      set_document_drag_state(false);
    }
    function drag_enters_push(event){
      var element = event.target;
      drag_enters.push(element);
      set_document_drag_state(true);
    }
    function drag_leaves_push(event){
      var element = event.target;
      var position_in_drag_enter = _.find(drag_enters, _.partial(_.isEqual, element));
      if(!_.isUndefined(position_in_drag_enter)){
        drag_enters.splice(position_in_drag_enter,1);
      }
      if(_.isEmpty(drag_enters)){
        set_document_drag_state(false);
      }
    }

    $document.bind("dragenter",function(event){
      console.log("enter", "doc","drag", event);
      drag_enters_push(event);
    });

    $document.bind("dragleave",function(event){
      console.log("leave", "doc", "drag", event);
      drag_leaves_push(event);
      console.log(drag_enters.length);
    });

    $document.bind("drop",function(event){
      reset_drag();
      console.log("drop","doc", "drag",event);
    });
  }
};

})

I use a list to represent the elements that have triggered a drag enter event. when a drag leave event happens i find the element in the drag enter list that matches, remove it from the list, and if the resulting list is empty i know that i have dragged outside of the document/window.

I need to reset the list containing dragged over elements after a drop event occurs, or the next time I start dragging something the list will be populated with elements from the last drag and drop action.

I have only tested this on chrome so far. I made this because Firefox and chrome have different API implementations of HTML5 DND. (drag and drop).

really hope this helps some people.

0

When the file enters and leaves child elements it fires additional dragenter and dragleave so you need to count up and down.

var count = 0

document.addEventListener("dragenter", function() {
    if (count === 0) {
        setActive()
    }
    count++
})

document.addEventListener("dragleave", function() {
    count--
    if (count === 0) {
        setInactive()
    }
})

document.addEventListener("drop", function() {
    if (count > 0) {
        setInactive()
    }
    count = 0
})
0

on "dropend" event you can check the value of the document.focus() was the magic trick in my case.

1
  • This should be a comment
    – user13146129
    Commented Mar 4, 2021 at 15:29
-1

I found out from looking at the spec that if the evt.dataTransfer.dropEffect on dragEnd match none then it's a cancelation.

enter image description here

I did already use that event to handle copying without affecting the clipboard. so this was good for me.
When I hit Esc then the drop effect was equal to none

window.ondragend = evt => {
  if (evt.dataTransfer.dropEffect === 'none') abort
  if (evt.dataTransfer.dropEffect === 'copy') copy // user holds alt on mac
  if (evt.dataTransfer.dropEffect === 'move') move 
}
1
  • The dragEnd event is not fired when dragging files. Commented Mar 19, 2023 at 1:06

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