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In my current project I am dealing with a multidimensional datastructure. The underlying file is stored sequentially (i.e. one huge array, no vector of vectors). The algorithms that use these datastructures need to know the size of the individual dimensions.

I am wondering if a multidimensional iterator class has been definied somewhere in a generic way and if there are any standards or preferred ways on how to tackle this.

At the moment I am just using a linear iterator with some additional methods that return the size of each dimension and how many dimensions are there in the first part. The reason I don't like it is because I can't use std:: distance in a reasonable way for example (i.e. only returns distance of the whole structure, but not for each dimension separately).

For the most part I will access the datastructure in a linear fashion (first dimension start to finish -> next dimension+...and so on), but it would be good to know when one dimension "ends". I don't know how to do this with just operator*(), operator+() and operator==() in such an approach.

A vector of vectors approach is disfavored, because I don't want to split up the file. Also the algorithms must operate on structure with different dimensionality and are therefore hard to generalize (or maybe there is a way?).

Boost multi_array has the same problems (multiple "levels" of iterators).

I hope this is not too vague or abstract. Any hint in the right direction would be appreciated.

I was looking for a solution myself again and revisited boost:: multi_array. As it turns out it is possible to generate sub views on the data with them, but at the same time also take a direct iterator at the top level and implicitely "flatten" the data structure. The implemented versions of multi_array however do not suit my needs, therefore I probably will implement one myself (that handles the caching of the files in the background) that is compatible with the other multi_arrays.

I will update it again once the implementation is done.

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    It looks like you have to implement multidimensional iterator yourself. Just don't limit yourself to operators: you can use named methods for querying info about current position in each dimension. Jul 16, 2015 at 8:51
  • 2
    This question is interesting. The only way I have found in order to provide such informations is to have methods that can deduce the multi index e.g. {x,y,z} from the flatten index (and vice versa). I do not see how you could do that in a "standard" way without providing your own custom class for that purpose.
    – coincoin
    Jul 16, 2015 at 8:58
  • Thank you both for the quick answer. @SergeRogatch: Thats what i also thought, but it seems so "anti-idiomatic".
    – Lazarus535
    Jul 16, 2015 at 10:53
  • @coincoin: Thats how i do it for now. But the conversion from linear index to the coordinates is computationally not triavial any more (difficult story:-)). Doing this for each point is costly. I wanted to somehow sail arround such a solution.
    – Lazarus535
    Jul 16, 2015 at 10:53
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    IF the datastructure is read-only (i.e. you load it from a file and then never change it) you can read the datastructure into your multidimensional datastructure and also into a flat vector on the side. Have the routines that need the flat iteration run on the flat vector and the routines that need multidimensional access use the multidimensional datastructure.
    – Ben Braun
    Jul 17, 2015 at 3:30

2 Answers 2

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I have just decided to open a public repository on Github : MultiDim Grid which might help for your needs. This is an ongoing project so I would be glad if you can try it and tell me what you miss / need.

I have started working on this with this topic on codereview.

Put it simply :

MultiDim Grid proposes a flat uni-dimensional array which offer a generic fast access between multi-dimension coordinates and flatten index.

You get a container behaviour so you have access to iterators.

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  • Thank (you both) for the answers and sry for only reacting so late...busy. By now i have rolled my own implementation, which is not unsimilar to your project and i am happy with it so far. I have not touched that code in a long, long time, because it just did what i wanted it to do, but if i do again, i check out your code and maybe combine forces.
    – Lazarus535
    Dec 2, 2016 at 21:27
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That's not that difficult to implement. Just state precisely what functionality your project requires. Here's a dumb sample.

#include <iostream>
#include <array>
#include <vector>
#include <cassert>

template<typename T, int dim>
class DimVector : public std::vector<T> {
public:
    DimVector() {
        clear();
    }

    void clear() {
        for (auto& i : _sizes)
            i = 0;
        std::vector<T>::clear();
    }

    template<class ... Types>
    void resize(Types ... args) {
        std::array<int, dim> new_sizes = { args ... };
        resize(new_sizes);
    }

    void resize(std::array<int, dim> new_sizes) {
        clear();
        for (int i = 0; i < dim; ++i)
            if (new_sizes[i] == 0)
                return;
        _sizes = new_sizes;
        int realsize = _sizes[0];
        for (int i = 1; i < dim; ++i)
            realsize *= _sizes[i];
        std::vector<T>::resize(static_cast<size_t>(realsize));
    }

    decltype(auto) operator()(std::array<int, dim> pos) {
        // check indexes and compute original index
        size_t index;
        for (int i = 0; i < dim; ++i) {
            assert(0 <= pos[i] && pos[i] < _sizes[i]);
            index = (i == 0) ? pos[i] : (index * _sizes[i] + pos[i]);
        }
        return std::vector<T>::at(index);
    }

    template<class ... Types>
    decltype(auto) at(Types ... args) {
        std::array<int, dim> pos = { args ... };
        return (*this)(pos);
    }

    int size(int d) const {
        return _sizes[d];
    }


    class Iterator {
    public:
        T& operator*() const;
        T* operator->() const;
        bool operator!=(const Iterator& other) const {
            if (&_vec != &other._vec)
                return true;
            for (int i = 0; i < dim; ++i)
                if (_pos[i] != other._pos[i])
                    return true;
            return false;
        }
        int get_dim(int d) const {
            assert(0 <= d && d < dim);
            return _pos[d];
        }
        void add_dim(int d, int value = 1) {
            assert(0 <= d && d < dim);
            _pos[d] += value;
            assert(0 <= _pos[i] && _pos[i] < _vec._sizes[i]);
        }
    private:
        DimVector &_vec;
        std::array<int, dim> _pos;
        Iterator(DimVector& vec, std::array<int, dim> pos) : _vec(vec), _pos(pos) { }
    };

    Iterator getIterator(int pos[dim]) {
        return Iterator(*this, pos);
    }

private:
    std::array<int, dim> _sizes;
};

template<typename T, int dim>
inline T& DimVector<T, dim>::Iterator::operator*() const {
    return _vec(_pos);
}

template<typename T, int dim>
inline T* DimVector<T, dim>::Iterator::operator->() const {
    return &_vec(_pos);
}

using namespace std;

int main() {

    DimVector<int, 4> v;
    v.resize(1, 2, 3, 4);
    v.at(0, 0, 0, 1) = 1;
    v.at(0, 1, 0, 0) = 1;

    for (int w = 0; w < v.size(0); ++w) {
        for (int z = 0; z < v.size(1); ++z) {
            for (int y = 0; y < v.size(2); ++y) {
                for (int x = 0; x < v.size(3); ++x) {
                    cout << v.at(w, z, y, x) << ' ';
                }
                cout << endl;
            }
            cout << "----------------------------------" << endl;
        }
        cout << "==================================" << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

TODO list:

  • optimize: use T const& when possible
  • optimizate iterator: precompute realindex and then just change that realindex
  • implement const accessors
  • implement ConstIterator
  • implement operator>> and operator<< to serialize DimVector to/from file

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