What is the best way to handle expired tokens in laravel 5.

I mean I have a page and it has some links which perform ajax requests. They work fine when the page is loaded but when I wait for sometime then I get a TOKEN MISMATCH error.

Now, I have to refresh the page to make it work again. BUT, I don't want to refresh the page. I want some way to refresh the token or some other work around to make it fix.

I hope you got my point.

  • are you using ajax or single page application? – UX Labs Jul 16 '15 at 9:49
  • i am using ajax. – Jamal Abdul Nasir Jul 16 '15 at 9:51
  • i'll post a work around – UX Labs Jul 16 '15 at 9:51
  • send csrf token if the ajax req is of post type if its of get type ajax should work without mismtach yoken be specific in ur routes accepting get or post method. – ujwal dhakal Jul 16 '15 at 10:04
  • I really love this question. I was really bothered by this problem. I'll write my answer now below. – Ryan May 22 '17 at 21:15
up vote 15 down vote accepted

a work around for it, is to actually get the new token every certain time, otherwise you are defeating the purpose of the csrf token:

<html>
    <head>
        <meta name="csrf_token" content="{{ csrf_token() }}">
    </head>
    <body>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            var csrfToken = $('[name="csrf_token"]').attr('content');

            setInterval(refreshToken, 3600000); // 1 hour 

            function refreshToken(){
                $.get('refresh-csrf').done(function(data){
                    csrfToken = data; // the new token
                });
            }

            setInterval(refreshToken, 3600000); // 1 hour 

        </script>
    </body>
</html>

In laravel routes

Route::get('refresh-csrf', function(){
    return csrf_token();
});

I apologize in case of any syntax errors, haven't used jquery for long time, but i guess you get the idea

  • 28
    This as written defeats the point of the csrf_token. You should pass the current token and only return a new token if the old is valid. Otherwise a malicious person could just hit the refresh-csrf route to get a token and use it to make any request that would normally be protected. – jfadich Sep 23 '15 at 20:41
  • 11
    Am I missing something here @jfadich and comment upvoters? Just being able to make a request to the csrf endpoint doesn't give the attacker a way to defeat the csrf protection. The attacker would still need to get the token into the user's session somehow (for example using a SOP bug or a XSS vulnerability) so I have no idea what the above comment means. – PeeHaa Dec 5 '16 at 8:37
  • 1
    This solution is viable, epscially for those of us who uses $.ajaxSetup({ headers: {'X-CSRF-TOKEN': csrfToken} }); However, you should also $("input[name=_token]").val(data); – ITDesigns.eu Dec 14 '16 at 6:42
  • 1
    @jfadich, could you elaborate on to how a "malicious person" could hit auth protected "refresh-csrf route"? Please, share your wisdom! – ITDesigns.eu Dec 14 '16 at 6:50
  • 1
    @berrunder, when I said "auth protected", I DID meant auth protected. Your request to auth-protected route will fall before any csrf could get added to anything. Refreshing of csrf is used to not send your input to expired void, in case the user is still active. – ITDesigns.eu Jan 9 '17 at 17:11

I combine 2 things for this case:

1. Increase session lifetime

//In config/session.php replace this:

'lifetime' => 120

//with:

'lifetime' => 360

Laravel 5 default lifetime is 120 (minutes), you can change it to whatever value you like, for example 360 (6 hours)

2. Catch the exception and display an error message

//In app/Exceptions/Handler.php replace this:

public function render($request, Exception $e)
{
    if ($e instanceof ModelNotFoundException) {
        $e = new NotFoundHttpException($e->getMessage(), $e);
    }

    return parent::render($request, $e);
}

//with:

public function render($request, Exception $e)
{
    if ($e instanceof ModelNotFoundException) {
        $e = new NotFoundHttpException($e->getMessage(), $e);
    }

    if ($e instanceof \Illuminate\Session\TokenMismatchException) {            
        return redirect('/')->withErrors(['token_error' => 'Sorry, your session seems to have expired. Please try again.']);
    }

    return parent::render($request, $e);
}

So basicaly you redirect the user to the root "/" (you can change this to any path you want) with an error message and on that page you have to do this to display the error message:

@if ($errors->has('token_error'))
    {{ $errors->first('token_error') }}
@endif
  • I'm trying really hard to go through this solution, as I find it very elegant: No token = no session, so redirect flashing the error. The problem is the error is put at the session but it is renewed as redirection creates another one, so at the moment of printing the error it is gone. I'm really stuck here, for 2 days. – Xavi Dec 28 '15 at 15:37
  • @Xavi - I don't know exactly what you have thare, but in case you use a redirect try to add the session error message as a parameter so you can have it on the new page. – paulalexandru Dec 28 '15 at 22:49
  • 1
    what if you redirect to login page with the error on token missmatch error? is it a good approach?? – Jamal Abdul Nasir Jan 26 '16 at 12:00
  • So you are redirecting a user to homepage with "Haha, you are too late, slowpoke" message, when token is expired? That's "convenient" :) Imagine user satisfaction after composing an articles for several hours and getting that "useful" message while loosing all his/her work. – ITDesigns.eu Dec 14 '16 at 6:31
  • 1
    @ITDesigns.eu - We've all been through this kind of situation and is frustrating, but in the same time we can't blame an application when we leave it open for 2 weeks and after that we want to continue from the same spot. It's not possible ! What do you want to do instead of showing a message? Do an ajax call every 1 minute and let the user know when his session expired? I don't think that this is the way. So a decent way is to increase the session time and in the same time disaply an error message. It's not your fault that the user session expired, it's his. – paulalexandru Dec 14 '16 at 7:13

I think the answer by @UX Labs is misleading. And then the comment from @jfadich seems completely incorrect.

For Laravel 5.4 in May 2017, I solved the problem this way:

Here Is an Answer That Works

In web.php:

Route::post('keep-token-alive', function() {
    return 'Token must have been valid, and the session expiration has been extended.'; //https://stackoverflow.com/q/31449434/470749
});

In javascript in your view:

$(document).ready(function () {

    setInterval(keepTokenAlive, 1000 * 60 * 15); // every 15 mins

    function keepTokenAlive() {
        $.ajax({
            url: '/keep-token-alive', //https://stackoverflow.com/q/31449434/470749
            type: 'post',
            headers: {
                'X-CSRF-TOKEN': $('meta[name="csrf-token"]').attr('content')
            }
        }).then(function (result) {
            console.log(new Date() + ' ' + result + ' ' + $('meta[name="csrf-token"]').attr('content'));
        });
    }

});

Note that you must not list 'keep-token-alive' in the exclusions within VerifyCsrfToken.php. As @ITDesigns.eu implied in a comment, it's important for this route to verify that there is a valid token currently and that it just needs to have its expiration extended.

Why this approach solves my problem

My Laravel site allows users to watch a video (an hour long), and it uses ajax to post their progress every minute.

But many users load the page and then don't start the video until many hours later.

I don't know why they leave their browser tab open so long before watching, but they do.

And then I'd get a ton of TokenMismatch exceptions in my logs (and would miss out on the data of their progress).

In session.php, I changed 'lifetime' from 120 to 360 minutes, but that still wasn't enough. And I didn't want to make it longer than 6 hours. So I needed to enable this one page to frequently extend the session via ajax.

How you can test it and get a sense for how the tokens work:

In web.php:

Route::post('refresh-csrf', function() {//Note: as I mentioned in my answer, I think this approach from @UX Labs does not make sense, but I first wanted to design a test view that used buttons to ping different URLs to understand how tokens work. The "return csrf_token();" does not even seem to get used.
    return csrf_token();
});
Route::post('test-csrf', function() {
    return 'Token must have been valid.';
});

In javascript in your view:

<button id="tryPost">Try posting to db</button>
<button id="getNewToken">Get new token</button>

(function () {
    var $ = require("jquery");

    $(document).ready(function () {
        $('body').prepend('<div>' + new Date() + ' Current token is: ' + $('meta[name="csrf-token"]').attr('content') + '</div>');
        $('#getNewToken').click(function () {
            $.ajax({
                url: '/refresh-csrf',
                type: 'post',
                headers: {
                    'X-CSRF-TOKEN': $('meta[name="csrf-token"]').attr('content')
                }
            }).then(function (d) {
                $('meta[name="csrf-token"]').attr('content', d);
                $('body').prepend('<div>' + new Date() + ' Refreshed token is: ' + $('meta[name="csrf-token"]').attr('content') + '</div>');
            });
        });
        $('#tryPost').click(function () {
            $.ajax({
                url: '/test-csrf',
                type: 'post',
                headers: {
                    'X-CSRF-TOKEN': $('meta[name="csrf-token"]').attr('content')
                }
            }).then(function (d) {
                $('body').prepend('<div>' + new Date() + ' Result of test: ' + d + '</div>');
            });
        });


    });
})();

In session.php, temporarily change 'lifetime' to something very short for testing purposes.

Then play around.

This is how I learned how the Laravel token works and how we really just need to successfully POST to a CSRF-protected route frequently so that the token continues to be valid.

  • 1
    This should have gotten an up vote a while ago. The token and session timeouts are related but not the same. You can have a valid session kept alive by something like laravel-caffeine, but still have the form's csrf_token expire. This help me see the light. – JungleGenius Jul 4 '17 at 17:07
  • Please note that my comment on the other answer is indeed correct, but does not apply to your answer as written. The key difference is that you POST to a route, with a CSRF token, where the other answer uses a GET request without the CSRF protection. – jfadich Aug 9 '17 at 21:39
  • 1
    Very simple, thank you! It's even easier with axios, as it automatically sends the latest XSRF-TOKEN with every request. You can just do: setInterval(() => axios.post('/keep-token-alive'), 1000 * 60 * 15); – Clayton Apr 4 at 1:48

Increase the lifetime of your sessions. You can do so by editing the config/session.php file in your laravel configuration.

/*
|--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Session Lifetime
|--------------------------------------------------------------------------
|
| Here you may specify the number of minutes that you wish the session
| to be allowed to remain idle before it expires. If you want them
| to immediately expire on the browser closing, set that option.
|
*/

'lifetime' => 120,
  • 3
    yes, u r right. but wt if dat time is passed and the token is expired. – Jamal Abdul Nasir Jul 16 '15 at 10:59
  • ok, but if you are expecting to use a session longer than two hours, then you should set the value according to the expected time range. means, if your user should be able to use his session again after two hours or eaven a week, than thats the setting you should use. any other solution isn't a clean way - at least in my opinion ^^ – Thomas Venturini Jul 16 '15 at 12:28
  • 1
    But sometimes the user is not logged in and the token mismatched error is thrown. I dont understand why this happens. – Jamal Abdul Nasir Nov 18 '15 at 8:10
  • some weeks ago I had to deal with such a problem again. Use an ajax request to get a new token before any other ajax call is made. No clean approach but since we had to deal with some problems, this way was (in my particular case) the best way to go. take a look at this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/31449434/… – Thomas Venturini Nov 18 '15 at 12:55

I know it is not the best solution, but one of the simplest. Just disable CSRF protection for that page, where user spends a lot of time. For example on my site, they can write article for hours on one page. And it is very frustrating if you can't save article because of CSRF protection.

I think the best option is to take the lifetime configuration of the config/session.php file, then the lifetime value multiplied by 60 * 1000 in the javascript code. Use helper function config() provided by laravel, it might look like this:

<script type="text/javascript">
    var timeout = ({{config('session.lifetime')}} * 60) * 1000;
    setTimeout(function() {
        //reload on current page
        window.location = '';
    }, timeout);
</script>

This are all workarounds that I dont like.. (but I admit they can work) I dont know since witch version this exists on Laravel, but there is a way to exclude pages from CSRF token validation:

https://laravel.com/docs/5.5/csrf

Simply adding a record on $except array on VerifyCsrfToken Middleware with your uri that you want to exclude. Please take in account, this must only be done on specific cases.

This is the best solution for me... Simple and just like (almost) everything on Laravel, they already thought about it. ;)

a short and fast way.... for handling ajax requests,when token expire : add this script to the end of master layout or your document

$(window).load(function(){
    $.ajaxSetup({
        statusCode: {
            419: function(){
                    location.reload(); 
                }
        }
    });
});

and for handling http requests when token expires, create 419.blade.php in this path: \resources\views\errors and add this script to it:

<script type="text/javascript">
    //reload on current page
    window.location = '';

</script>

Circum-navigating the token is generally accepted as a terrible approach but there are problems with using js timers mentioned above too. js seetTimeout/setInterval is unreliable when the browser tab is either not it focus, minimised or in the case of many users, thier laptop/device is sleeping/closed etc.

A better route might be to use a js timer to recalculate the 'time to die' from a datestamp set in a cookie (or meta tag for fussy GDPR no-cookie users). this datestamp will be the realworld (timezoned) time the session will die and is updated every page refresh. This way, it doesn't matter what the browser/device was doing/not doing whilst you were away AND it'll still be acurate for those with 'keep me signed in' etc.

The next problem is what to do instead of auto resfreshing the token - present the user with a 're-login in' form (modal/popup) that ajaxes the new token to the page as mentioned above.

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