160

I want to convert an integer into its character equivalent based on the alphabet. For example:

0 => a
1 => b
2 => c
3 => d

etc. I could build an array and just look it up when I need it but I’m wondering if there’s a built in function to do this for me. All the examples I’ve found via Google are working with ASCII values and not a character’s position in the alphabet.

12 Answers 12

302

Assuming you want lower case letters:

var chr = String.fromCharCode(97 + n); // where n is 0, 1, 2 ...

97 is the ASCII code for lower case 'a'. If you want uppercase letters, replace 97 with 65 (uppercase 'A'). Note that if n > 25, you will get out of the range of letters.

80

Will be more portable in case of extending to other alphabets:

char='abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'[code]

or, to be more compatible (with our beloved IE):

char='abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'.charAt(code);
  • 5
    Much more elegant than String.fromCharCode in my opinion, as as you said, it extends very easily. – Sasha Chedygov Jun 29 '10 at 22:01
  • 7
    And when you have no need of extending, maybe more prone to errors? abcede – Nelson Rothermel Jun 29 '10 at 22:07
  • 5
    FYI JScript (IE) does not support the index operator [] on strings. – Crescent Fresh Jun 29 '10 at 22:21
  • 4
    @Crescent, the [] property accessor on strings is supported on IE from IE8 up (IE8 in IE7 compat mode also doesn't works), String.prototype.chatAt is preferred instead of [] for browser compatibility. E.g. 'foo'.charAt(0) == 'f' – CMS Jun 29 '10 at 22:53
  • 2
    @Crescent, forgot to mention that the [] property accessor on strings is standardized on ECMAScript 5 (see [[GetOwnProperty]](P)). – CMS Jun 29 '10 at 23:01
26

If you don't mind getting multi-character strings back, you can support arbitrary positive indices:

function idOf(i) {
    return (i >= 26 ? idOf((i / 26 >> 0) - 1) : '') +  'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'[i % 26 >> 0];
}

idOf(0) // a
idOf(1) // b
idOf(25) // z
idOf(26) // aa
idOf(27) // ab
idOf(701) // zz
idOf(702) // aaa
idOf(703) // aab

(Not thoroughly tested for precision errors :)

  • 1
    Recursive function, very nice! – John Virgolino Mar 22 '16 at 22:24
  • @mikemaccana, why this edit? I think it makes it harder to read. Now I have to scroll horizontally to read the code. – z0r May 11 '17 at 1:23
  • @z0r So people using the code won't have to fix the newline. There's no reason to break lines arbitrarily, editors will wrap at the character size of their window. – mikemaccana May 12 '17 at 13:42
  • This works great, is there a variant to do the opposite? – Ethannn Jul 8 '17 at 22:06
17

A simple answer would be (26 characters):

String.fromCharCode(97+n);

If space is precious you could do the following (20 characters):

(10+n).toString(36);

Think about what you could do with all those extra bytes!

How this works is you convert the number to base 36, so you have the following characters:

0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
^         ^
n        n+10

By offsetting by 10 the characters start at a instead of 0.

Not entirely sure about how fast running the two different examples client-side would compare though.

  • 2
    I enjoyed your base 36 creativity – Josh Nov 16 '16 at 22:37
6

Javascript's String.fromCharCode(code1, code2, ..., codeN) takes an infinite number of arguments and returns a string of letters whose corresponding ASCII values are code1, code2, ... codeN. Since 97 is 'a' in ASCII, we can adjust for your indexing by adding 97 to your index.

function indexToChar(i) {
  return String.fromCharCode(i+97); //97 in ASCII is 'a', so i=0 returns 'a', 
                                    // i=1 returns 'b', etc
}
  • 4
    Well, to be pedantic, it takes a variable number of arguments, not an infinite number. – wchargin Jan 14 '15 at 20:05
3

Use String.fromCharCode. This returns a string from a Unicode value, which matches the first 128 characters of ASCII.

var a = String.fromCharCode(97);
2

There you go: (a-zA-Z)

function codeToChar( number ) {
  if ( number >= 0 && number <= 25 ) // a-z
    number = number + 97;
  else if ( number >= 26 && number <= 51 ) // A-Z
    number = number + (65-26);
  else
    return false; // range error
  return String.fromCharCode( number );
}

input: 0-51, or it will return false (range error);

OR:

var codeToChar = function() {
  var abc = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ".split("");
  return function( code ) {
    return abc[code];
  };
})();

returns undefined in case of range error. NOTE: the array will be created only once and because of closure it will be available for the the new codeToChar function. I guess it's even faster then the first method (it's just a lookup basically).

  • That works with ASCII, I need to work with the position of the character in the alphabet. – VIVA LA NWO Jun 29 '10 at 21:54
  • notice: this will give you the capitals... – Sinan Jun 29 '10 at 21:57
  • @VIVA - I think you could have worked this out? @Galambalaza - I think you want 65 not 64 – James Westgate Jun 29 '10 at 21:59
  • i just showed how simple it is. he could've worked this out. but there you go. see the update – gblazex Jun 29 '10 at 22:00
1

The only problemo with @mikemaccana's great solution is that it uses the binary >> operator which is costly, performance-wise. I suggest this modification to his great work as a slight improvement that your colleagues can perhaps read more easily.

const getColumnName = (i) => {
     const previousLetters = (i >= 26 ? getColumnName(Math.floor(i / 26) -1 ) : '');
     const lastLetter = 'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ'[i % 26]; 
     return previousLetters + lastLetter;
}

Or as a one-liner

const getColumnName = i => (i >= 26 ? getColumnName(Math.floor(i / 26) -1 ) : '') + 'ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ'[i % 26];

Example:

getColumnName(0); // "A"
getColumnName(1); // "B"
getColumnName(25); // "Z"
getColumnName(26); // "AA"
getColumnName(27); // "AB"
getColumnName(80085) // "DNLF"
1

I don't like all the solutions that use magic numbers like 97 or 36.

const A = 'A'.charCodeAt(0);

let numberToCharacter = number => String.fromCharCode(A + number);

let characterToNumber = character => character.charCodeAt(0) - A;

this assumes uppercase letters and starts 'A' at 0.

-3

Assuming you want uppercase case letters:

function numberToLetter(num){
        var alf={
            '0': 'A', '1': 'B', '2': 'C', '3': 'D', '4': 'E', '5': 'F', '6': 'G'
        };
        if(num.length== 1) return alf[num] || ' ';
        return num.split('').map(numberToLetter);
    }

Example:

numberToLetter('023') is ["A", "C", "D"]

numberToLetter('5') is "F"

number to letter function

-4

It generates random number and char for phone verification or something else.

function randomIntFromInterval(min,max)
{
    return Math.floor(Math.random()*(max-min+1)+min);
}




function generateRandomVerification(length){
let char;
let sum ="";
  for(let i=0;i < length;i++){
    if(Math.round(Math.random())){
      random = randomIntFromInterval(65,90);
      char = String.fromCharCode(random);//65-90
      sum = sum + char;
      console.log("CHAR: ", char);
    }else{
      random = randomIntFromInterval(48,57);
      char = String.fromCharCode(random);//48-57
      sum = sum + char;
      console.log("CHAR: ", char);
    }
  }
  alert(sum);
}

generateRandomVerification(5);

Here is link

-8
public static string IntToLetters(int value)
{
string result = string.Empty;
while (--value >= 0)
{
result = (char)('A' + value % 26 ) + result;
value /= 26;
}
return result;
}

To meet the requirement of A being 1 instead of 0, I've added -- to the while loop condition, and removed the value-- from the end of the loop, if anyone wants this to be 0 for their own purposes, you can reverse the changes, or simply add value++; at the beginning of the entire method.

  • 3
    Downvoting. This question, as most of the world in 2015, is not about Java. – Chiru Dec 2 '15 at 15:14

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