In Objective-C in non-trivial blocks I noticed usage of weakSelf/strongSelf.

What is the correct way of usage strongSelf in Swift? Something like:

if let strongSelf = self {
  strongSelf.doSomething()
}

So for each line containing self in closure I should add strongSelf check?

if let strongSelf = self {
  strongSelf.doSomething1()
}

if let strongSelf = self {
  strongSelf.doSomething2()
}

Is there any way to make aforesaid more elegant?

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Using strongSelf is a way to check that self is not equal to nil. When you have a closure that may be called at some point in the future, it is important to pass a weak instance of self so that you do not create a retain cycle by holding references to objects that have been deinitialized.

{[weak self] () -> void in 
      if let strongSelf = self {
         strongSelf.doSomething1()
      }
}

Essentially you are saying if self no longer exists do not hold a reference to it and do not execute the action on it.

  • A clear explanation. – Mississippi Aug 9 '17 at 9:06
  • You can also substitute if let with guard let here to avoid another nesting (indentation) level: guard let strongSelf = self else { return } – Jonathan Cabrera Aug 9 at 18:16

another way to use weak selfwithout using strongSelf

{[weak self] () -> void in 
      guard let `self` = self else { return }
      self.doSomething()
}

Your use of strongSelf appears to be directed at only calling the doSomethingN() method if self is not nil. Instead, use optional method invocation as the preferred approach:

self?.doSomethingN()

If you use self in your closure it is automatically used as strong.

There is also way to use as weak or unowned if you trying to avoid a retain cycles. It is achieved by passing [unowned self] or [weak self] before closure's parameters.

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