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I have two models, one stores events and the other is a join model to a calendar model. The join model integrates with a remote Calendar API, and manages itself through API calls when created or deleted (through before_save and before_destroy callbacks).

This works great when deleting join model records one at a time, but since I have dependent: :destroy on the has_many association defined in my event model (I do not want orphaned events in the remote calendar), deletion of a single event will cause N api calls (where N is the number of join model records, which could hypothetically be thousands) which would readily cause timeouts.

Ideally I would like to delay the CalendarEvent.destroy call, but only when it is called from the deletion of an Event. For example:

Event.destroy [call delay.destroy on all CalendarEvent (join model) records] CalendarEvent.destroy [destroy without delayed_job]

Is there a way to delay this through the has_many call?

Is there a way to pass a custom destroy method through dependent:?

Is there a way, in the CalendarEvent.destroy method, to know whether or not it's being called from a dependent: :destroy definition?

  • I would just launch a job on deletion, through sidekiq or like. – Aleksei Matiushkin Jul 16 '15 at 15:32
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Is there a way to delay this through the has_many call?

There is not.


Is there a way to pass a custom destroy method through dependent:?

Also no; there are only a handful of accepted options in the docs:

:destroy causes all the associated objects to also be destroyed.

:delete_all causes all the associated objects to be deleted directly from the database (so callbacks will not be executed).

:nullify causes the foreign keys to be set to NULL. Callbacks are not executed.

:restrict_with_exception causes an exception to be raised if there are any associated records.

:restrict_with_error causes an error to be added to the owner if there are any associated objects.


Is there a way, in the CalendarEvent.destroy method, to know whether or not it's being called from a dependent: :destroy definition?

You could technically sniff the stack trace in caller, but that doesn't sound like a great idea.


I'd remove the dependent: option and build a custom after_destroy that cleans up the CalendarEvent objects in a delayed fashion.

after_destroy :destroy_calendar_events

def destroy_calendar_events
  calendar_events.each {|event| event.delay.destroy }
end

A loooong time ago, a company I worked at solved this problem with Async Observer, which provided an async_destroy method, but that was based on Beanstalk and would need to be adapted. The code might be interesting if you want to bake something in.

  • 1
    Close - probably would work without foreign keys in the database (foreign keys without the dependent: :destroy do NOT want to work). Did not work for my particular case, but I'll upvote this answer because it will probably work for others without FK issues. – crypticsymbols Jul 16 '15 at 18:35
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Kristján's answer would probably have worked, but I was having foreign key issues. Foreign keys without the dependent: :destroy do NOT want to work.

Then I had issues with delayed_job wanting to store the RSA key for my delayed job in the DB entry if I tried to delay the API Service object itself. Yikes. It didn't validate the (empty) key anyway, so it failed on 2 fronts.

Then I tried to delay a method on the object instance that made a fresh API object. Of course it failed, because delayed job tries to load the object (already destroyed) to run the job. Smack forehead, scream, pull hair, repeat.

What finally ended up working was to call a class method (or it could really be an external service object, etc), only passing in strings (not counting on any object that could be deleted to provide necessary information).

class CalendarEvent

  # bunch o' stuff

  def destroy
    self.class.delay.remove_remote_event!(user, remote_calendar_id, remote_id)
  super
  end

  def self.remove_remote_event!(user, remote_calendar_id, remote_id)
    EpGoogle::Interfaces::Calendar.new(user.email).delete_event(remote_calendar_id, remote_id)
  end

end

...and then DelayedJob is able to run the task successfully.

It's not as awesome as I'd like because the remote events can be orphaned if the Job fails, but it's good enough for my use case.

  • Ah, makes sense with foreign key constraints. Honestly, though the DBA gods will surely drop my afterlife, I stopped using foreign key constraints year ago in favor of code and tests, and haven't looked back. – Kristján Jul 16 '15 at 20:54

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