6
(irb) a, b = 5
a => 5
b => nil

Shouldn't that be the other way around? What is actually happening here?

2
  • 1
    Multiple assignment treats the right-hand side of the expression as a splatted array. a, b = 5 is interpreted as a, b = *[5] Jul 16, 2015 at 18:58
  • 1
    If you want to assign the value to both variables, use a = b = 5.
    – Gumbo
    Jul 16, 2015 at 19:29

3 Answers 3

6

As I was writing this my coworker discovered why:

Ruby treats a, b = 5 as a, b = 5, nil

In Python3, a TypeError is thrown.

2
  • 1
    If you're used to JavaScript, where var a, b = 5 is two separate assignments, this will come as a surprise. In Ruby, list assignment is more like (a, b) = (5, nil) when expanded. The left-hand side is treated as a list. Things get even more confused with a, b = 5, c = 3 which results in a = 5, b = 3, c = 3.
    – tadman
    Jul 16, 2015 at 18:49
  • a, b = 5, c = 3 is less confusing if you read it as -> a, b = *[5, c = 3] Jul 16, 2015 at 18:59
2

In order to assign a value to b using multiple assignment you'd have to give it a second value.

a, b = 5, 6

a = 5
b = 6

When you don't supply a second value, Ruby gives b a value of nil

1

This is an important Ruby feature called multiple assignment.

Multiple assignment performs multiple assignment from expressions or an array. It's a fast way to assign multiple variables at once.

If you declare three variables, but only assign values to two of them, the third will receive nil by default.

The Multiple Assignment portion of this documentation explains the feature and several examples.

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