I have a set of points pts which form a loop and it looks like this:

enter image description here

This is somewhat similar to 31243002, but instead of putting points in between pairs of points, I would like to fit a smooth curve through the points (coordinates are given at the end of the question), so I tried something similar to scipy documentation on Interpolation:

values = pts
tck = interpolate.splrep(values[:,0], values[:,1], s=1)
xnew = np.arange(2,7,0.01)
ynew = interpolate.splev(xnew, tck, der=0)

but I get this error:

ValueError: Error on input data

Is there any way to find such a fit?

Coordinates of the points:

pts = array([[ 6.55525 ,  3.05472 ],
   [ 6.17284 ,  2.802609],
   [ 5.53946 ,  2.649209],
   [ 4.93053 ,  2.444444],
   [ 4.32544 ,  2.318749],
   [ 3.90982 ,  2.2875  ],
   [ 3.51294 ,  2.221875],
   [ 3.09107 ,  2.29375 ],
   [ 2.64013 ,  2.4375  ],
   [ 2.275444,  2.653124],
   [ 2.137945,  3.26562 ],
   [ 2.15982 ,  3.84375 ],
   [ 2.20982 ,  4.31562 ],
   [ 2.334704,  4.87873 ],
   [ 2.314264,  5.5047  ],
   [ 2.311709,  5.9135  ],
   [ 2.29638 ,  6.42961 ],
   [ 2.619374,  6.75021 ],
   [ 3.32448 ,  6.66353 ],
   [ 3.31582 ,  5.68866 ],
   [ 3.35159 ,  5.17255 ],
   [ 3.48482 ,  4.73125 ],
   [ 3.70669 ,  4.51875 ],
   [ 4.23639 ,  4.58968 ],
   [ 4.39592 ,  4.94615 ],
   [ 4.33527 ,  5.33862 ],
   [ 3.95968 ,  5.61967 ],
   [ 3.56366 ,  5.73976 ],
   [ 3.78818 ,  6.55292 ],
   [ 4.27712 ,  6.8283  ],
   [ 4.89532 ,  6.78615 ],
   [ 5.35334 ,  6.72433 ],
   [ 5.71583 ,  6.54449 ],
   [ 6.13452 ,  6.46019 ],
   [ 6.54478 ,  6.26068 ],
   [ 6.7873  ,  5.74615 ],
   [ 6.64086 ,  5.25269 ],
   [ 6.45649 ,  4.86206 ],
   [ 6.41586 ,  4.46519 ],
   [ 5.44711 ,  4.26519 ],
   [ 5.04087 ,  4.10581 ],
   [ 4.70013 ,  3.67405 ],
   [ 4.83482 ,  3.4375  ],
   [ 5.34086 ,  3.43394 ],
   [ 5.76392 ,  3.55156 ],
   [ 6.37056 ,  3.8778  ],
   [ 6.53116 ,  3.47228 ]])
  • 1
    Are you willing to install a new package/framework? If you are the sort of fitting you are talking about is available through the ROOT-Framework as well as a huge variety of other fitting options. It should be pretty easy to adapt the 2D Histogram example to fit your data in PyROOT(the python interface to ROOT which uses python syntax instead of the C++ interpreter). If that is something that you are not opposed to I can post a proper answer and example. – Matt Jul 16 '15 at 21:21
  • 1
    @Matt: Thank you for your comment. I don't mind installing a new package, although my concern is that the output can be used in matplotlib (I have a few pictures and would like to keep the same style in this one). – Mahdi Jul 16 '15 at 21:27
  • 1
    This has apparently been a concern for someone else as there was a post about using matplotlib w/ ROOT. ROOT is a very powerful tool and I would recommend trying it out, there are a lot of great features for data analysis and visualization. – Matt Jul 16 '15 at 21:41
  • Actually in ROOT this does not need to use any of the fitting libraries, the regular drawing options are sufficient to get a smooth curve. I read the data in and drew it using the C++ interpreter if you would like to see the results I can post the code and images as an answer. – Matt Jul 16 '15 at 22:03
  • @Matt While I don't doubt that ROOT is amazing for particle data analysis, it is completely overkill for the task at hand, that can be easily achieved with Scipy. But, well I suppose one can always have fun with build instructions (step 1, step2) . Especially if you want to combine this with some scientific python distribution (e.g. Anaconda, EPD) on Windows, this can probably keep you busy for a few days (reading the 600 pages manual not included) ... – rth Jul 16 '15 at 23:12
up vote 20 down vote accepted

Actually, you were not far from the solution in your question.

Using scipy.interpolate.splprep for parametric B-spline interpolation would be the simplest approach. It also natively supports closed curves, if you provide the per=1 parameter,

import numpy as np
from scipy.interpolate import splprep, splev
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

# define pts from the question

tck, u = splprep(pts.T, u=None, s=0.0, per=1) 
u_new = np.linspace(u.min(), u.max(), 1000)
x_new, y_new = splev(u_new, tck, der=0)

plt.plot(pts[:,0], pts[:,1], 'ro')
plt.plot(x_new, y_new, 'b--')
plt.show()

enter image description here

Fundamentally, this approach not very different from the one in @Joe Kington's answer. Although, it will probably be a bit more robust, because the equivalent of the i vector is chosen, by default, based on the distances between points and not simply their index (see splprep documentation for the u parameter).

  • nice! thx for posting. – Jason S Jul 17 '15 at 0:58
  • 1
    It's concise and works great, what else I want? – Mahdi Jul 17 '15 at 2:02
  • to what is this magical "pts.T" referring? – Ryder Brooks Apr 5 '17 at 14:55
  • @rth Can you please explain the solution? – mlRocks Sep 12 '17 at 11:48

Your problem is because you're trying to work with x and y directly. The interpolation function you're calling assumes that the x-values are in sorted order and that each x value will have a unique y-value.

Instead, you'll need to make a parameterized coordinate system (e.g. the index of your vertices) and interpolate x and y separately using it.

To start with, consider the following:

import numpy as np
from scipy.interpolate import interp1d # Different interface to the same function
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

#pts = np.array([...]) # Your points

x, y = pts.T
i = np.arange(len(pts))

# 5x the original number of points
interp_i = np.linspace(0, i.max(), 5 * i.max())

xi = interp1d(i, x, kind='cubic')(interp_i)
yi = interp1d(i, y, kind='cubic')(interp_i)

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.plot(xi, yi)
ax.plot(x, y, 'ko')
plt.show()

enter image description here

I didn't close the polygon. If you'd like, you can add the first point to the end of the array (e.g. pts = np.vstack([pts, pts[0]])

If you do that, you'll notice that there's a discontinuity where the polygon closes.

enter image description here

This is because our parameterization doesn't take into account the closing of the polgyon. A quick fix is to pad the array with the "reflected" points:

import numpy as np
from scipy.interpolate import interp1d 
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

#pts = np.array([...]) # Your points

pad = 3
pts = np.pad(pts, [(pad,pad), (0,0)], mode='wrap')
x, y = pts.T
i = np.arange(0, len(pts))

interp_i = np.linspace(pad, i.max() - pad + 1, 5 * (i.size - 2*pad))

xi = interp1d(i, x, kind='cubic')(interp_i)
yi = interp1d(i, y, kind='cubic')(interp_i)

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.plot(xi, yi)
ax.plot(x, y, 'ko')
plt.show()

enter image description here

Alternately, you can use a specialized curve-smoothing algorithm such as PEAK or a corner-cutting algorithm.

  • Thank you for an awesome answer and detailed explanation. – Mahdi Jul 17 '15 at 1:58

Using the ROOT Framework and the pyroot interface I was able to generate the following image Drawing Using pyroot

With the following code(I converted your data to a CSV called data.csv so reading it into ROOT would be easier and gave the columns titles of xp,yp)

from ROOT import TTree, TGraph, TCanvas, TH2F

c1 = TCanvas( 'c1', 'Drawing Example', 200, 10, 700, 500 )
t=TTree('TP','Data Points')
t.ReadFile('./data.csv')
t.SetMarkerStyle(8)
t.Draw("yp:xp","","ACP")
c1.Print('pydraw.png')

To fit a smooth closed curve through N points you can use line segments with the following constraints:

  • Each line segment has to touch its two end points (2 conditions per line segment)
  • For each point the left and right line segment have to have the same derivative (2 conditions per point == 2 conditions per line segment)

To be able to have enough freedom for in total 4 conditions per line segment the equation of each line segment should be y = ax^3 + bx^2 + cx + d. (so the derivative is y' = 3ax^2 + 2bx + c)

Setting the conditions as suggested would give you N * 4 linear equations for N * 4 unknowns (a1..aN, b1..bN, c1..cN, d1..dN) solvable by matrix inversion (numpy).

If the points are on the same vertical line special (but simple) handling is required since the derivative will be "infinite".

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